December 11, 2018

Winnipeg
-5° C, Overcast

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Teen girl pleads guilty in First Nation beating death, Crown seeking adult sentence

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 10/1/2018 (335 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

After breaking down in her school counsellor's office and turning herself in to police for her role in a deadly beating that attracted national attention, a 17-year-old Sagkeeng First Nation girl could be sentenced as an adult.

The Crown is seeking an adult sentence for the girl, who was 16 when she and another teenage girl viciously beat 19-year-old Serena McKay and left her outside to freeze to death last April. The extensive injuries McKay suffered — including 19 different head wounds — and her intoxication at the time meant she couldn't protect herself from the cold, court heard.

The 17-year-old girl pleaded guilty to manslaughter Wednesday in the fatal beating, portions of which were videotaped and circulated widely on social media in the days and weeks that followed.

Two days after the beating, the then-16-year-old became emotional in a school counsellor's office, admitting to punching McKay in the nose. The counsellor called RCMP and the teen later surrendered to police.

Get the full story.
No credit card required. Cancel anytime.

Join free for 30 days

After that, pay as little as $0.99 per month for the best local news coverage in Manitoba.

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Join free for 30 days

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 10/1/2018 (335 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

After breaking down in her school counsellor's office and turning herself in to police for her role in a deadly beating that attracted national attention, a 17-year-old Sagkeeng First Nation girl could be sentenced as an adult.

The Crown is seeking an adult sentence for the girl, who was 16 when she and another teenage girl viciously beat 19-year-old Serena McKay and left her outside to freeze to death last April. The extensive injuries McKay suffered — including 19 different head wounds — and her intoxication at the time meant she couldn't protect herself from the cold, court heard.

John Woods / The Canadian Press Files</p><p>Parts of the attack on Serena McKay were filmed on a cellphone camera and circulated on social media. Friends, family and supporters held a vigil for the 19 year old in April.</p></p>

John Woods / The Canadian Press Files

Parts of the attack on Serena McKay were filmed on a cellphone camera and circulated on social media. Friends, family and supporters held a vigil for the 19 year old in April.

The 17-year-old girl pleaded guilty to manslaughter Wednesday in the fatal beating, portions of which were videotaped and circulated widely on social media in the days and weeks that followed.

Two days after the beating, the then-16-year-old became emotional in a school counsellor's office, admitting to punching McKay in the nose. The counsellor called RCMP and the teen later surrendered to police.

Late last month, her now-18-year-old co-accused also admitted her guilt, pleading guilty to second-degree murder. Neither of the accused can be publicly identified because they were underage at the time of the killing. Both girls admitted they were drinking with McKay, their high school classmate, at a house party on April 22. An argument broke out about alcohol and McKay was kicked out. That's when the beating started outside the house, court heard. It continued into the night, with witnesses reporting they could hear yelling and a girl being told to "kill yourself."

The now-17-year-old accused would later tell an acquaintance she fought McKay for being disrespectful.

"I don’t want to f—-ing see her alive," she said at one point during the assault, court was told.

The older accused recorded the attack on her cellphone camera and later sent the video to friends; video clips circulated on social media, drawing national attention to the attack at the same time Sagkeeng's grieving community was holding an anti-violence vigil in McKay's honour.

Although the video didn't show the faces of McKay's attackers, one girl can be heard asking the other to take over the beating, calling her by her first name. She held down a crying McKay as the other girl stomped on McKay's face.

Afterward, the two co-accused, along with the older girl's boyfriend, went back into the house, leaving McKay to die.

The 16-year-old accused showed off her bloody clothes on Snapchat with the caption "just chillin'." She would later send panicked messages to her co-accused, asking the other girl to tell police McKay was up and walking before they went inside the house and locked the door, court heard.

"She was found dead bro. Promise me, say when we fought it wasn’t that bad, her nose was just bleeding lots," she wrote in a Facebook message. "Promise me you won’t tell them I fought her deadly, please bro. Say after we closed the door she left, she just walked away."

McKay was reported missing before her body was discovered, with her burned identification cards nearby. The then-17-year-old would later say she wanted to call police the night of the beating, but her boyfriend had taken her phone away. She and her boyfriend later approached other people who had been at the party earlier that night and asked them to lie about what happened. No criminal charges were authorized against the boyfriend.

Members of McKay's family who were present in court Wednesday declined to speak to reporters afterward.

Crown attorney Jennifer Comack said she will argue in June that the teen should be sentenced as an adult for manslaughter. Her defence lawyer, James Wood, told court Wednesday he will challenge the Crown's application, arguing for a youth sentence.

Her co-accused, who pleaded guilty Dec. 22, is expected to be sentenced in April under the Youth Criminal Justice Act, in which the maximum penalty for second-degree murder is seven years.

Both accused were initially charged with second-degree murder.

katie.may@freepress.mb.ca

Twitter: @thatkatiemay

Katie May

Katie May
Justice reporter

Katie May reports on courts, crime and justice for the Free Press.

Read full biography

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

History

Updated on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at 3:15 PM CST: Writethrough

The Winnipeg Free Press is not accepting comments on this story.

Why aren't comments accepted on this story? See our Commenting Terms and Conditions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us