November 11, 2019

Winnipeg
-14° C, A few clouds

Full Forecast

Addictions-services reform lagging, critics say

A year after key report, advocates say there's been little progress

It’s been about five years since Arlene Last-Kolb’s son died of a fentanyl overdose and she began lobbying for improvements to addiction services.

She laments how it often feels like a solo fight.

"We pay taxes. My son paid taxes. Our government works for us. Our premier works for us," Last-Kolb said. "So why do I feel like I’m working for him? Why do I feel like I’m doing somebody else’s job?"

Last week marked the one-year anniversary of the release of the Virgo report, which is a blueprint to improve and intertwine Manitoba’s mental health and addictions systems. The 279-page report, delivered by a Toronto consulting team co-led by Dr. Brian Rush, was distributed on May 14, 2018.

'How many times do we have to say "immediate help" over and over and over again' - Arlene Last-Kolb

Last-Kolb was one of about 350 stakeholders who were consulted.

She — and other critics — are frustrated by the pace of progress.

"How many times do we have to say ‘immediate help’ over and over and over again?" Last-Kolb said.

In an email, the province said that so far, it has acted on 26 of the report’s 125 recommendations.

The Virgo report doesn’t include timelines for when each of the recommendations should be followed. Rush’s team described 15 short-term priorities, including enhanced capacity for services outside Winnipeg and supports tailored for new immigrants and refugees.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Carrying an armful of documents she is handing over to the NDP the Official Opposition, Arlene Last-Kolb has been working with Overdose Manitoba to petition the provincial government to take action on the addictions crises.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Carrying an armful of documents she is handing over to the NDP the Official Opposition, Arlene Last-Kolb has been working with Overdose Manitoba to petition the provincial government to take action on the addictions crises.

The Winnipeg mother said that during consultations for the report, meth consumption wasn’t the all-hands-on-deck issue it is now. Much of the report’s contents relate to opioids, which dominated discussions about addiction almost exclusively a few years ago.

Manitoba’s Advocate for Children and Youth, Daphne Penrose, has repeatedly called for more mental health and addiction services for young people, many of whom are addicted to meth.

The Virgo report recommended "giving immediate funding priority to the expansion of services for children and youth... for people with (substance use addictions), eating disorders, and those who have experienced severe trauma."

'I know (Virgo) is a big report. I understand that. But we need a plan for kids and we need to get moving on that plan' - Manitoba's Advocate for Children and Youth, Daphne Penrose

Last September, Penrose put out a three-page statement of concern about the province’s slow response.

"I could republish this statement today," she said Friday.

The advocate’s office has also published four special reports in the last year, three of which focused on the deaths of children: Circling Star, Angel and Tina Fontaine.

All three children struggled with substance use during their young lives, as do many more youth who visit the advocate’s office every day, she said.

Penrose expects to publish her first audit of the October report on Circling Star by the end of the month. One of her recommendations therein was for the government to fully implement Virgo.

The advocate said she is optimistic about the province’s response; it has set up a committee of deputy ministers to deal directly with her recommendations.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Arlene Last-Kolb (centre) and Rebecca Rummery, co-founder of Overdose Manitoba, discuss Last-Kolb's petition with NDP MLA Nahanni Fontaine.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Arlene Last-Kolb (centre) and Rebecca Rummery, co-founder of Overdose Manitoba, discuss Last-Kolb's petition with NDP MLA Nahanni Fontaine.

"We have gotten the first set of recommendations back and the response plans to the recommendations. And some really thoughtful and meaningful work has gone into some of those responses," Penrose said. "Where I continue to have questions is around the addictions piece and the mental health piece."

"I know (Virgo) is a big report. I understand that," she added. "But we need a plan for kids and we need to get moving on that plan. Because every day that passes, there are kids out using and struggling with their addictions and they need help."

Health Minister Cameron Friesen was not made available for an interview to discuss progress on the report. He answered two questions about it on Wednesday.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Last-Kolb (right) shows NDP MLA Nahanni Fontaine (left) her armful of documents she is handing over to the NDP as the Official Opposition. Arlene has been working with Overdose Manitoba to petition the provincial government to take action on the addictions crises.</p><p>

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Last-Kolb (right) shows NDP MLA Nahanni Fontaine (left) her armful of documents she is handing over to the NDP as the Official Opposition. Arlene has been working with Overdose Manitoba to petition the provincial government to take action on the addictions crises.

"The challenge that that report pointed out was that we had very good practitioners and clinicians and people working in mental health and addictions in this province, but working in sub-optimal areas because the system was not well-aligned," Friesen said.

"Manitobans recognize that solving that and responding to over 100 recommendations is going to take time. Nevertheless this government continues to show progress (with) meaningful investments that have been made in just the last year that respond directly to that report."

The investments include opening five Rapid Access to Addictions Medicine clinics; doubling the number of treatment beds for women at the Addictions Foundation of Manitoba, to 24; adding six in-patient mental health beds at Health Sciences Centre; and enhancing access to medications such as naltrexone, which helps manage alcohol or opioid dependency.

Daphne Penrose, the Manitoba Advocate for Children and Youth, said progress on implementing badly needed addictions services is not evident.

JOHN WOODS / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILES

Daphne Penrose, the Manitoba Advocate for Children and Youth, said progress on implementing badly needed addictions services is not evident.

Last-Kolb said local access to medically assisted detox facilities is urgently needed. She helped create a petition, which was circulated by Overdose Awareness Manitoba, that will be presented at the legislature by the NDP this week. About 5,000 Manitobans have signed it so far.

"The huge, urgent issue we have to confront is meth use. Most of what the government’s pointing to in that (Virgo) document has to do with opioids. So they’re missing the mark," NDP Leader Wab Kinew said. "It’s not that opioids aren’t important, of course they are. We have to address those. But there’s this huge vacuum in terms of responding in a real way to the meth crisis."

It was the first time Last-Kolb had put together a petition, and it was the first time in a very long while that she felt hopeful, she said.

"Nobody’s listening to sad stories anymore. I am not telling my sad story anymore," she said.

"I’m talking about moving forward. I’m talking about change."

jessica.botelho@freepress.mb.ca

Twitter: @_jessbu

Jessica Botelho-Urbanski

Jessica Botelho-Urbanski
Legislature reporter

Jessica Botelho-Urbanski covers the Manitoba Legislature for the Winnipeg Free Press.

Read full biography

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

History

Updated on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 at 9:53 AM CDT: Updates headline.

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us