Close
Head Start
Winnipeg Free Press
Free Press Head Start for July 19
 ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 

Free Press Head Start for July 19

Good morning.

Did you miss me? This newsletter was on hiatus while I was on vacation, except for a pared-down version on July 5. While I was away, I caught seven fish, saw one lynx or bobcat and suffered countless mosquito bites. 

Treaty 5 First Nations will unveil an “action plan” in the wake of the Tory government’s “policy perspectives on residential schools” on the steps of the provincial legislature later this morning.

Niigaan Sinclair’s latest column is on a phone call he received from Alan Lagimodiere, who issued an apology after comments he made about residential schools when he was introduced as Indigenous and northern relations minister. Two Indigenous men have since quit their positions on provincial economic development boards because of the “rewriting of Canadian history” by Premier Brian Pallister’s government. A protest was held at the legislature this weekend to criticize Pallister and Lagimodiere’s controversial comments and oppose Bill 64.

A special air-quality statement has been issued for Winnipeg because of smoke from forest fires. Thunder could be heard in the city this morning, and severe thunderstorm warnings and watches were in effect for other areas in southern Manitoba. 

— Adam Treusch, assignment editor

What’s happening today


Chelsea Kork is part of a growing community of people who have contracted COVID-19, appeared to recover, then are hit with long-haul symptoms of the virus. (John Woods / Winnipeg Free Press)

COVID-19 update: The provincial government will hold its regular Monday news conference on the pandemic. The province announced 44 new cases and one death Sunday. Malak Abas reports on long-haul survivors who suffer lingering effects from the virus. Read More

Seats go on sale: Single-game tickets for Winnipeg Blue Bombers games go on sale to the general public at 10 a.m. Only fully vaccinated fans are allowed at IG Field. Read More

Positive test in Tokyo: A Czech beach volleyball player is the third athlete to test positive for COVID-19 at the Olympic Village in Tokyo. Read More

Many killed in crash: At least 33 people were killed and 40 injured when a bus slammed into a truck on a highway in Pakistan. The Associated Press reports. Read More

Set for sentencing: A Florida man who breached the U.S. Senate chamber while holding a Trump campaign flag is scheduled to become the first person sentenced for a felony committed during the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol. The Associated Press reports. Read More

 

Weather


Your forecast: A mix of sun and cloud with a high of 29 C, humidex of 34 and wind from the north at 20 km/h.

 

In case you missed it


Robyn Rypp waters the lawn of her River Heights home twice a week, trying to keep the grass and plants alive during the extreme heat and drought. (Alex Lupul / Winnipeg Free Press)

Foundations falling: In addition to creating hazardous forest fire conditions and hurting farmers, Manitoba’s dry spell is also damaging the foundations of some homes. Cody Sellar reports. Read More

DeMelo decision: In his latest column, Mike McIntyre examines the Jets’ opting to leave defenceman Dylan DeMelo exposed in Wednesday’s expansion draft. Read More

Cheers to Chi-Chi’s: Here is a weekend feature by Declan Schroeder on the fondly remembered Chi-Chi’s restaurant. Read More

Non-confidence vote nixed: A non-confidence vote slated for Tuesday that could have led to the ouster of federal Green party Leader Annamie Paul has been called off. The Canadian Press reports. Read More

 

On this date


On July 19, 1961: The Winnipeg Free Press reported that as drought hit the Prairies, Manitoba's agriculture minister launched the province's fodder-bank program and urged farmers to start cutting ruined grain crops for winter fodder. The plan had the support of prime minister John Diefenbaker. As well, both the CNR and CPR were planning to offer a one-third reduction in freight rates on hay and fodder going to drought-stricken western farmers. The drought was also expected to put a severe crimp into North America's duck hunt.

 

Today's front page


Get the full story: Read today's e-edition of the WInnipeg Free Press Read More