June 25, 2019

Winnipeg
16° C, Partly cloudy

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Opinion

The rise and fall of the NDP

How the party went from majority to disarray

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 7/3/2015 (1571 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

To paraphrase one of the greatest minds of our generation, mid-1990s rapper Coolio, "there ain't no party like a New Democratic Party 'cause the New Democratic Party don't stop."

In power in Manitoba since 1999, the NDP has put together one of Canada's longest-running political dynasties, second only in duration to the more than 43-year Progressive Conservative government in Alberta.

Now, however, the Manitoba NDP is fearful the 16-year party may actually come to a stop. That's the impetus behind this weekend's leadership contest, which may very well determine whether the party can secure another mandate in 2016.

Here's how the Dippers got to where they are:

Get the full story.
No credit card required. Cancel anytime.

Join free for 30 days

After that, pay as little as $0.99 per month for the best local news coverage in Manitoba.

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Keep reading free:

I agree to the Terms and Conditions, Cookie and Privacy Policies, and CASL agreement.

 

Already have an account?

Log in here »

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 7/3/2015 (1571 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

To paraphrase one of the greatest minds of our generation, mid-1990s rapper Coolio, "there ain't no party like a New Democratic Party 'cause the New Democratic Party don't stop."

In power in Manitoba since 1999, the NDP has put together one of Canada's longest-running political dynasties, second only in duration to the more than 43-year Progressive Conservative government in Alberta.

Now, however, the Manitoba NDP is fearful the 16-year party may actually come to a stop. That's the impetus behind this weekend's leadership contest, which may very well determine whether the party can secure another mandate in 2016.

Here's how the Dippers got to where they are:

 

September 2011

During the last provincial election campaign, Hugh McFadyen's Tories claim the Greg Selinger's NDP government is preparing to hike the provincial sales tax to nine per cent. The premier denies this vehemently.

"Ridiculous ideas that we're going to raise the sales tax. That's total nonsense. Everybody knows that," he says following a debate.

Under provincial law, the PST couldn't rise without a referendum, officials note. The NDP increases its plurality in the October 2011 vote.

 

March 2013

On budget day, Selinger announces the PST would rise to eight per cent and said the resulting revenue would pay for infrastructure and flood recovery.

Provincial budget documents, however, show the province planned to spend less on infrastructure that year than it did in 2012.

Seizing upon the hike, the Progressive Conservatives, now led by Brian Pallister, begin a two-year campaign to ostensibly fight the PST hike, noting the province is subverting its referendum law. In reality, the campaign is intended to draw attention to the premier's about-face.

 

March 2014

A Probe Research poll gives the Tories an 18-percentage-point lead over the NDP. This narrows to 13 points by June, but the hand-wringing begins behind the scenes, as party officials contemplate a defeat by the Progressive Conservatives in an election expected in 2016.

Summer 2014

Selinger holds one-on-one meetings with NDP caucus members and some political staff, asking for advice about whether he should stay or go. Some allege they were no longer trusted by the premier after telling him what he didn't want to hear.

 

September 2014

NDP caucus members are provided with polling data suggesting Pallister's PST publicity campaign has worked and that the Progressive Conservatives will win big in 2016 if Selinger remains premier. This sparks a behind-the-scenes caucus revolt.

 

October 2014

Selinger cancels a trade mission to China, ostensibly to deal with an indigenous protest at a Manitoba Hydro dam — but primarily to deal with the growing caucus rebellion.

Days later, former NDP MP and MLA Judy Wasylycia-Leis finishes a distant second in Winnipeg's mayoral race after leading in the polls most of the year. The damage to the NDP brand is floated as one reason for the size of Mayor Brian Bowman's margin of victory.

By the end of the month, Finance Minister Jennifer Howard, Justice Minister Andrew Swan, Health Minister Erin Selby, Jobs and Economy Minister Theresa Oswald and Municipal Government Minister Stan Struthers publicly call on Selinger to resign. He declines.

November 2014

The so-called Gang of Five caucus dissidents resign from cabinet, placing Manitoba's political turmoil on the national stage. Selinger assembles a new cabinet and the rebels are allowed to remain in caucus.

NDP staff branded as disloyal begin streaming out of the Manitoba legislature, but pressure on Selinger remains.

Within a week, he calls for a leadership contest at the NDP's convention. This sparks weeks of wrangling over the rules governing how the race will unfold.

 

December 2014

After a month of messy political machinations over the rules of the leadership campaign, the NDP decides Selinger can remain leader as he runs to keep his job. A new Angus Reid poll then places the Manitoba NDP at an all-time low. By the end of the year, Oswald and Steve Ashton officially enter the party leadership race.

 

January and February 2015

Early in the year, Selinger files his nomination papers. A three-way battle for delegates ensues — and proves to be just as awkward as the wrangling over the rules governing the contest.

Unions are handed large blocs of delegate votes, over and above riding delegates. Every candidate claims different totals for delegate support. And some riding contests are marred by accusations some delegates were not counted.

 

This weekend

The NDP convention is held. It's expected to take two ballots to declare a winner.

 

bartley.kives@freepress.mb.ca

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

History

Updated on Saturday, March 7, 2015 at 9:18 AM CST: Alters reference to Progressive Conservatives in Albert in paragraph two.

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us