September 20, 2017

Winnipeg
14° C, A few clouds

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

A poignant WWI romance

One of the letters Cliff Chapman sent to his future wife, Meryl Snyder,  which were found under the floorboards of a Winnipeg home.

One of the letters Cliff Chapman sent to his future wife, Meryl Snyder, which were found under the floorboards of a Winnipeg home.

Gordon Sinclair's fascinating column about the hidden literary treasure found by Lori and Darrell Lafond impressed me in several ways (A century-old love story, July 19).

Wartime suitor Cliff Chapman's personal handwriting is simply beautiful to look at -- a cursive art form lost in the present era -- and unquestionably links, in style, his deep emotion expressed in letters to his love interest, Miss Snyder.

The interestingly poignant story of this First World War romance shouldn't be shelved or forgotten, but presented as an entire collection of pr ose published in book form, or perhaps scripted as a feature film.

One could entitle the story 202 Ethelbert Street, but Love Letters From the Attic also says it all.

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Add a payment method

To read the remaining 7 words of this article.

Pay only 27¢ for others you wish to read.

Hope you enjoyed your trial.

Add a payment method

To read the remaining 7 words of this article.

Pay only 27¢ for others you wish to read.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 23/7/2014 (1154 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Gordon Sinclair's fascinating column about the hidden literary treasure found by Lori and Darrell Lafond impressed me in several ways (A century-old love story, July 19).

Wartime suitor Cliff Chapman's personal handwriting is simply beautiful to look at — a cursive art form lost in the present era — and unquestionably links, in style, his deep emotion expressed in letters to his love interest, Miss Snyder.

The interestingly poignant story of this First World War romance shouldn't be shelved or forgotten, but presented as an entire collection of pr ose published in book form, or perhaps scripted as a feature film.

One could entitle the story 202 Ethelbert Street, but Love Letters From the Attic also says it all.

Don Warkentin

Winnipeg

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective January 2015.