With fiery reds, oranges and yellows decorating the city now that the cooler weather has arrived, it’s hard to ignore our lovely urban forest. In recent weeks, trees have been on my mind quite a bit. I ventured out to The Forks one weekend to pick up some free trees that were being offered through a partnership between the Manitoba 150 Host Committee, Telpay and Trees Canada as part of the Million Tree Challenge. They had 10,000 trees and shrubs to give out, including white spruce, willow, dogwood and poplar. The idea is that through multiple tree giveaway events, residents can access free trees to plant in their yards, adding to Winnipeg’s urban tree canopy. Initiatives like these are important, since the city’s tree canopy has been facing significant challenges, including pests such as the emerald ash borer and diseases such as Dutch elm, along with extreme heat and lack of water in the summer and less snowfall in the winter. The city loses thousands of trees each year, and is set to potentially lose around two-thirds of its overall urban tree canopy in the future. In addition to the Manitoba 150-related tree giveaways, Trees Winnipeg offers a unique program called ReLeaf, through which residents and business owners can purchase low-cost tree packages that include trees, mulch, trunk guards and valuable tree planting info. A variety of trees are available each time the program is offered in the spring and fall, including lilac, cherry, maple, birch, hackberry, bur oak, linden, willow, mugo pine and cedar. If you’re interested in planting trees in your yard, you should know that autumn is a great time to do so. As long as there is no immediate risk of frost and the ground is still soft enough to dig a hole, trees can be planted well into the fall, and this is sometimes preferable to planting in summer because you don’t have to worry about the tree being stressed from hot temperatures and not enough water. By including a tree or two in your yard, you’ll be helping to increase Winnipeg’s important tree canopy, provide habitat and food sources for birds and other creatures, and have something pretty to look at when you gaze out your window or spend time outside. You can learn more about tree programs available to Winnipeggers by visiting www.manitoba150.com/en/programs/trees-150/#top and www.releaf-with-trees-winnipeg.myshopify.com/ Trees Winnipeg also offers some great tree planting tips at www.treeswinnipeg.org/tree-care-101/tree-selection-planting. Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

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This article was published 11/10/2021 (265 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

With fiery reds, oranges and yellows decorating the city now that the cooler weather has arrived, it’s hard to ignore our lovely urban forest.
In recent weeks, trees have been on my mind quite a bit. I ventured out to The Forks one weekend to pick up some free trees that were being offered through a partnership between the Manitoba 150 Host Committee, Telpay and Trees Canada as part of the Million Tree Challenge.
They had 10,000 trees and shrubs to give out, including white spruce, willow, dogwood and poplar. The idea is that through multiple tree giveaway events, residents can access free trees to plant in their yards, adding to Winnipeg’s urban tree canopy.
Initiatives like these are important, since the city’s tree canopy has been facing significant challenges, including pests such as the emerald ash borer and diseases such as Dutch elm, along with extreme heat and lack of water in the summer and less snowfall in the winter.
The city loses thousands of trees each year, and is set to potentially lose around two-thirds of its overall urban tree canopy in the future.
In addition to the Manitoba 150-related tree giveaways, Trees Winnipeg offers a unique program called ReLeaf, through which residents and business owners can purchase low-cost tree packages that include trees, mulch, trunk guards and valuable tree planting info.
A variety of trees are available each time the program is offered in the spring and fall, including lilac, cherry, maple, birch, hackberry, bur oak, linden, willow, mugo pine and cedar.
If you’re interested in planting trees in your yard, you should know that autumn is a great time to do so.
As long as there is no immediate risk of frost and the ground is still soft enough to dig a hole, trees can be planted well into the fall, and this is sometimes preferable to planting in summer because you don’t have to worry about the tree being stressed from hot temperatures and not enough water.
By including a tree or two in your yard, you’ll be helping to increase Winnipeg’s important tree canopy, provide habitat and food sources for birds and other creatures, and have something pretty to look at when you gaze out your window or spend time outside.
You can learn more about tree programs available to Winnipeggers by visiting www.manitoba150.com/en/programs/trees-150/#top and www.releaf-with-trees-winnipeg.myshopify.com/
Trees Winnipeg also offers some great tree planting tips at www.treeswinnipeg.org/tree-care-101/tree-selection-planting.
Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

With fiery reds, oranges and yellows decorating the city now that the cooler weather has arrived, it’s hard to ignore our lovely urban forest.

Correspondent Melody Rogan picked up this spruce sapling at The Forks recently as part of the Million Tree Challenge.

PHOTO BY MELODY ROGAN

Correspondent Melody Rogan picked up this spruce sapling at The Forks recently as part of the Million Tree Challenge.

In recent weeks, trees have been on my mind quite a bit. I ventured out to The Forks one weekend to pick up some free trees that were being offered through a partnership between the Manitoba 150 Host Committee, Telpay and Trees Canada as part of the Million Tree Challenge.

They had 10,000 trees and shrubs to give out, including white spruce, willow, dogwood and poplar. The idea is that through multiple tree giveaway events, residents can access free trees to plant in their yards, adding to Winnipeg’s urban tree canopy.

Initiatives like these are important, since the city’s tree canopy has been facing significant challenges, including pests such as the emerald ash borer and diseases such as Dutch elm, along with extreme heat and lack of water in the summer and less snowfall in the winter.

The city loses thousands of trees each year, and is set to potentially lose around two-thirds of its overall urban tree canopy in the future.

In addition to the Manitoba 150-related tree giveaways, Trees Winnipeg offers a unique program called ReLeaf, through which residents and business owners can purchase low-cost tree packages that include trees, mulch, trunk guards and valuable tree planting info.

A variety of trees are available each time the program is offered in the spring and fall, including lilac, cherry, maple, birch, hackberry, bur oak, linden, willow, mugo pine and cedar.

If you’re interested in planting trees in your yard, you should know that autumn is a great time to do so.

As long as there is no immediate risk of frost and the ground is still soft enough to dig a hole, trees can be planted well into the fall, and this is sometimes preferable to planting in summer because you don’t have to worry about the tree being stressed from hot temperatures and not enough water.

By including a tree or two in your yard, you’ll be helping to increase Winnipeg’s important tree canopy, provide habitat and food sources for birds and other creatures, and have something pretty to look at when you gaze out your window or spend time outside.

You can learn more about tree programs available to Winnipeggers by visiting www.manitoba150.com/en/programs/trees-150/#top and www.releaf-with-trees-winnipeg.myshopify.com

Trees Winnipeg also offers some great tree planting tips at www.treeswinnipeg.org/tree-care-101/tree-selection-planting

 

Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

Melody Rogan

Melody Rogan
Radisson community correspondent

Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com