All Sections

December 7, 2019

Winnipeg
-3° C, Overcast

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Keep Portage and Main closed to pedestrians

The public should be asked whether it approves of re-opening Portage and Main to foot traffic in the Oct. 24 civic election.

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

The public should be asked whether it approves of re-opening Portage and Main to foot traffic in the Oct. 24 civic election.

Re-opening the intersection of Portage Avenue and Main Street will cost millions of dollars — up to $15 million by some estimates, depending on the design and the work done. 
If that figure is true and the cost is equally divided between the 15 city wards, St. James will end up paying $1 million for the re-opening of the intersection. 
Closer to home, I wonder how various St. James traffic safety issues might relate to the safety issues in the  Portage and Main debate.    
In the past decade, there are have been several serious accidents at Portage Avenue and Berry Street. In June, 2007, after a building was struck at that intersection, people signed a petition calling for a left-turn signal from Portage onto Berry. 
In 2014, a pedestrian/vehicle collision at Portage Avenue and Mount Royal Road led to the installation of  timers on the walk signals at that intersection, which already had a red-light camera.
In August, 2010, a pedestrian was killed crossing Portage Avenue just west of St. James Street. In 2011, the Core Fire Hall Access Report expressed concern that the  new emergency traffic signal on Portage Avenue for fire trucks would encourage unsafe pedestrian crossings in front of the new fire hall, so the city rehabilitated a pedestrian underpass on the east side of Route 90 underneath Portage Avenue underpass. 
In this instance, using an underpass clearly made more sense than a street-level crossing. 
So, if it makes sense for all pedestrians to cross Portage underground between Queen and St. James streets, why should the underground crossing of Portage and Main between McDermot and Graham be discouraged?  
Portage Avenue has anywhere from six to eight lanes of traffic along its route from the Perimeter to downtown, and pedestrian crossing is banned at several of its intersections. Most of these intersections feature significant traffic flow, so why remove the ban for the most complicated Portage Avenue intersection at Main Street? 
Manitoba Public Insurance statistics listed 12 intersections as the most dangerous for pedestrians between 2009 and 2014. The intersections of Portage Avenue and Maryland, Ferry and Cavalier were  all on the list. Will the proposed re-opening of Portage and Main add that intersection to the list?
Fred Morris is a community correspondent for St. James. Reach him at fredmorris@hotmail.com

Re-opening the intersection of Portage Avenue and Main Street will cost millions of dollars — up to $15 million by some estimates, depending on the design and the work done. 

If that figure is true and the cost is equally divided between the 15 city wards, St. James will end up paying $1 million for the re-opening of the intersection. 

Closer to home, I wonder how various St. James traffic safety issues might relate to the safety issues in the  Portage and Main debate. In the past decade, there are have been several serious accidents at Portage Avenue and Berry Street. In June, 2007, after a building was struck at that intersection, people signed a petition calling for a left-turn signal from Portage onto Berry. 

In 2014, a pedestrian/vehicle collision at Portage Avenue and Mount Royal Road led to the installation of  timers on the walk signals at that intersection, which already had a red-light camera.

In August, 2010, a pedestrian was killed crossing Portage Avenue just west of St. James Street. In 2011, the Core Fire Hall Access Report expressed concern that the  new emergency traffic signal on Portage Avenue for fire trucks would encourage unsafe pedestrian crossings in front of the new fire hall, so the city rehabilitated a pedestrian underpass on the east side of Route 90 underneath Portage Avenue underpass. 

In this instance, using an underpass clearly made more sense than a street-level crossing. 

So, if it makes sense for all pedestrians to cross Portage underground between Queen and St. James streets, why should the underground crossing of Portage and Main between McDermot and Graham be discouraged?

Portage Avenue has anywhere from six to eight lanes of traffic along its route from the Perimeter to downtown, and pedestrian crossing is banned at several of its intersections. Most of these intersections feature significant traffic flow, so why remove the ban for the most complicated Portage Avenue intersection at Main Street? 

Manitoba Public Insurance statistics listed 12 intersections as the most dangerous for pedestrians between 2009 and 2014. The intersections of Portage Avenue and Maryland, Ferry and Cavalier were  all on the list. Will the proposed re-opening of Portage and Main add that intersection to the list?

Fred Morris is a community correspondent for St. James. Reach him at fredmorris@hotmail.com

Fred Morris

Fred Morris
St. James community correspondent

Fred Morris is a community correspondent for St. James.

Read full biography

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us