Civic Election 2014

Media and mayoralty: race matters

By Erin Tolley 4 minute read Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014

Last week, Winnipeggers elected Brian Bowman as their mayor. Bowman's official biography mentions his working-class background, his love of the Jets and the family dog, Indiana. Not mentioned is the fact Bowman is also Métis, something that was rarely referred to during the campaign, either by him or the media.

Nonetheless, in the coverage that followed his election, many outlets shifted gears, calling the win "historic" and noting Bowman is the city's first aboriginal mayor.

Contrast this to Robert-Falcon Ouellette, the mayoral race's third-place finisher.

Ouellette is Cree, something he mentions on his website. While referencing his ethnic identity, Ouellette touted unity in his platform, and his policy booklet was entitled Policies for Everyone. Nonetheless, his aboriginal status was frequently mentioned in his media coverage, and Ouellette referred to Winnipeg as a city divided by race.

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Bowman’s newest deal

By Dan Lett 4 minute read Preview

Bowman’s newest deal

By Dan Lett 4 minute read Monday, Oct. 27, 2014

The day after his resounding victory in Winnipeg's civic election, mayor-elect Brian Bowman got his first audience with Premier Greg Selinger.

It was not, in Bowman's words, a working meeting. It was just a chance for the premier to congratulate a man who is, for now, arguably the most popular politician in Manitoba.

Selinger said he and Bowman should work well together because they support many of the same priorities. "That gives us a lot of common ground."

Perhaps, but many of the things Bowman is looking for -- particularly the legislative authority to impose new municipal taxes to reduce the emphasis on taxing property -- will not go down easily with the NDP government.

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Monday, Oct. 27, 2014

Joe Bryksa / Winnipeg Free Press
Brian Bowman wants to create a "high performance" council.

Let’s remove the barriers to voting

Editorial 4 minute read Preview

Let’s remove the barriers to voting

Editorial 4 minute read Monday, Oct. 27, 2014

Voter turnout in the latest civic election once again climbed following 2006's disastrous levels. In that sense, city administrators should be congratulated because the improvement in voter turnout can likely be seen as a result of the extension of advance polling. But overall, it is clear the way elections are conducted in this city, province, and country is antiquated, cumbersome and needs serious improvement.

In 2010, city administrators expanded advance polling locations and the number of days available to vote. The ease of being able to vote while shopping for shoes meant voter turnout increased to 47.1 per cent from 38.2 per cent in 2006. This year, even more people took advantage of the convenience with 30,619 votes placed from Sept. 29 to Oct. 17 -- a 20 per cent increase -- and our overall voting turnout was just over 50 per cent.

Despite the fact Winnipeg outshines other Prairie cities such as Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary and Edmonton in terms of voter turnout, more can and should be done to attract voters and make it more convenient.

First, any barriers preventing individuals from voting must be removed. The requirement of having an address and identification with that address can be difficult, particularly for persons living in poverty and those who move a lot.

Read
Monday, Oct. 27, 2014

Voter turnout in the latest civic election once again climbed following 2006's disastrous levels. In that sense, city administrators should be congratulated because the improvement in voter turnout can likely be seen as a result of the extension of advance polling. But overall, it is clear the way elections are conducted in this city, province, and country is antiquated, cumbersome and needs serious improvement.

In 2010, city administrators expanded advance polling locations and the number of days available to vote. The ease of being able to vote while shopping for shoes meant voter turnout increased to 47.1 per cent from 38.2 per cent in 2006. This year, even more people took advantage of the convenience with 30,619 votes placed from Sept. 29 to Oct. 17 -- a 20 per cent increase -- and our overall voting turnout was just over 50 per cent.

Despite the fact Winnipeg outshines other Prairie cities such as Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary and Edmonton in terms of voter turnout, more can and should be done to attract voters and make it more convenient.

First, any barriers preventing individuals from voting must be removed. The requirement of having an address and identification with that address can be difficult, particularly for persons living in poverty and those who move a lot.

Let’s fix the city’s social infrastructure

By Dennis Lewycky 4 minute read Preview

Let’s fix the city’s social infrastructure

By Dennis Lewycky 4 minute read Monday, Oct. 27, 2014

During this election, our physical-infrastructure deficit got substantial attention as it is a concern to many Winnipeggers. The social-infrastructure deficit is also important but got less attention. Now that a new mayor and council have been elected, it is important to stress the needs of both our physical and social infrastructure.

What city hall can do to help meet the needs of individuals, families and diverse communities, is as important as providing for our pavement, pipes and police. Funding social supports, cultural events, housing, recreational facilities and community development is important to the quality of city life, and therefore the economic life of the city.

By incorporating social equity (a fair sharing of resources) and inclusion in all planning and developments in the city, we can better meet our social needs and tap into our social capital -- the community assets and resources needed for effective community-building. Social equity and inclusion are both a means and an end for a safe, healthy and prosperous community.

During the election, some ideas were proposed to foster equity and inclusion.

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Monday, Oct. 27, 2014

During this election, our physical-infrastructure deficit got substantial attention as it is a concern to many Winnipeggers. The social-infrastructure deficit is also important but got less attention. Now that a new mayor and council have been elected, it is important to stress the needs of both our physical and social infrastructure.

What city hall can do to help meet the needs of individuals, families and diverse communities, is as important as providing for our pavement, pipes and police. Funding social supports, cultural events, housing, recreational facilities and community development is important to the quality of city life, and therefore the economic life of the city.

By incorporating social equity (a fair sharing of resources) and inclusion in all planning and developments in the city, we can better meet our social needs and tap into our social capital -- the community assets and resources needed for effective community-building. Social equity and inclusion are both a means and an end for a safe, healthy and prosperous community.

During the election, some ideas were proposed to foster equity and inclusion.

Ouellette attracted unlikely voters to make inroads into downtown neighbourhoods

Inayat Singh 4 minute read Preview

Ouellette attracted unlikely voters to make inroads into downtown neighbourhoods

Inayat Singh 4 minute read Monday, Oct. 27, 2014

Robert-Falcon Ouellette, the surprise third-place finisher in this week’s mayor’s race, scored well in downtown neighbourhoods and captured votes in areas that usually register a low turnout.

Returns from polling stations show Ouellette, a 37-year-old Cree and University of Manitoba administrator, won 15.7 per cent of the vote behind winner Brian Bowman and runner-up Judy Wasylycia-Leis, the heavy favourite throughout much of the race. He had started the campaign as a virtually unknown outsider, and analysts said the outcome could prompt politicians to pay greater attention to aboriginal and other inner-city voters.

While Bowman won by a wide margin and took most of the city, especially the suburbs, Ouellette came first in several city centre districts — possibly eating into what might have been Wasylycia-Leis’s support.

“I’m amazed by it,” Ouellette said by phone, after seeing a Free Press map of election results by polling subdivision — small areas of 700 to 800 voters.

Read
Monday, Oct. 27, 2014

WAYNE GLOWACKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Mayoral candidate Robert-Falcon Ouellette is greeted by his supporters as he arrives at his HQ on election night.

Bowman has chance to take city forward

Dan Lett 4 minute read Preview

Bowman has chance to take city forward

Dan Lett 4 minute read Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

In late 2009 and early 2010, there was a dream that became known as the Winnipeg Citizens Coalition.

This diverse group of political organizers and operatives formed around the idea that in any given election, a single progressive civic candidate, properly supported and well-organized, could not only take down some listless lifers on council, but also likely defeat incumbent Mayor Sam Katz.

The result, the coalition promised, would be a wholesale change in culture at city hall. A new spirit that would replace the expediency and cronyism of the Katz years with an urgent, forward-thinking age of civic enlightenment.

The WCC elected an executive, raised some money, released a poll and started looking for a mayoral candidate. The person they were looking for was not necessarily an established politician from centre-left parties such as the NDP or Liberals. A candidate who had little or no political baggage, a condition that would give them a credibility that would cross partisan lines.

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Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

In late 2009 and early 2010, there was a dream that became known as the Winnipeg Citizens Coalition.

This diverse group of political organizers and operatives formed around the idea that in any given election, a single progressive civic candidate, properly supported and well-organized, could not only take down some listless lifers on council, but also likely defeat incumbent Mayor Sam Katz.

The result, the coalition promised, would be a wholesale change in culture at city hall. A new spirit that would replace the expediency and cronyism of the Katz years with an urgent, forward-thinking age of civic enlightenment.

The WCC elected an executive, raised some money, released a poll and started looking for a mayoral candidate. The person they were looking for was not necessarily an established politician from centre-left parties such as the NDP or Liberals. A candidate who had little or no political baggage, a condition that would give them a credibility that would cross partisan lines.

Ouellette’s star still on the rise

By Bartley Kives 4 minute read Preview

Ouellette’s star still on the rise

By Bartley Kives 4 minute read Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

The day after Winnipeg's mayoral race, Robert-Falcon Ouellette wasn't answering the cordless phone at his South St. Vital home.

This wasn't because the University of Manitoba administrator was avoiding calls from well-wishers following his moral-victory, third-place finish. Rather, one of his five children had plunked the phone in a vase full of water and flowers sent by Manitoba Opposition Leader Brian Pallister.

The morning after Ouellette garnered nearly 37,000 votes and 16 per cent of the popular vote, political parties began courting the PhD-educated, photogenic and well-spoken Cree educator, who went from being an unknown fringe candidate to a mayoral contender during the six-month campaign.

Ouellette attracted the vast majority of his votes not through an extensive volunteer apparatus, but on the basis of his charisma, as well as what he represents. He is a highly educated, comfortably middle-class, suburban indigenous professional.

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Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

WAYNE GLOWACKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Mayoral candidate Robert-Falcon Ouellette is greeted by his supporters as he arrives at his HQ on election night.

Result shocks Bowman

By Aldo Santin 7 minute read Preview

Result shocks Bowman

By Aldo Santin 7 minute read Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

Brian Bowman's landslide victory in Winnipeg's mayoral race took everyone by surprise, including Bowman.

Retired political science professor Chris Leo said the mayor-designate offered Winnipeggers what they really wanted, and Winnipeggers responded.

Bowman "had an extensive program with quite a lot of things in it," said Leo, a senior scholar at the University of Winnipeg. "People were looking for aspirations. People took a look at what (Bowman) was promising and him personally and decided he was the best."

Residents gave Bowman, the first-time politician, a resounding 47.5 per cent of the vote, almost more than all the other candidates combined. Judy Wasylycia-Leis, the favourite for most of the campaign, scored 24.9 per cent while Robert-Falcon Ouellette, the race's surprise, was credited with 15.7 per cent in third place.

Read
Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

Melissa Tait / Winnipeg Free Press
Mayor-elect Brian Bowman poses for a selfie with Luke Nolan Thursday morning in the Exchange District.

New mayor faces high expectations

editorial 4 minute read Preview

New mayor faces high expectations

editorial 4 minute read Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

Winnipeg has elected an energetic, young, progressive mayor with a lot of ideas on how to move the city forward.

His enthusiasm and optimism are infectious, which may well be the very qualities that appealed to a majority of Winnipeggers, rather than his elaborate hodgepodge of policy announcements.

Mr. Bowman faces a long learning curve and he will quickly realize advancing civic interests and getting city hall to work are a complicated business that have frustrated both political veterans and rookies alike.

In the short term, he should implement his pledge to create an executive policy secretariat, a group of policy advisers that serves as a liaison between the mayor's office and the civic administration. Mayor Sam Katz had disbanded the body, which shifted power to the administration and, in particular, to the chief administrative officer.

Read
Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

Brian Bowman

Fired principal elected to board

By Nick Martin 3 minute read Preview

Fired principal elected to board

By Nick Martin 3 minute read Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

Thompson's Mystery Lake school board will be an interesting place during the next four years as former high school principal Ryan Land has won a seat on the same board that fired him.

Equally interesting could be the Swan Valley School Division's board, where a parent uprising turfed out five incumbent trustees amid charges the division consistently hires and promotes out-of-province teachers over local teachers.

Despite more than 61 per cent of rural school board seats being acclaimed or having no candidates running, there were significant races around Manitoba, races in which 18 incumbents lost their seats.

The old guard is gone in Thompson, where the Mystery Lake trustees had publicly rebuked and publicly fired Land as principal of R.D. Parker Collegiate in 2011. The province investigated after Mystery Lake went through three superintendents, eight assistant superintendents, three high school principals and nine high school vice-principals in four years.

Read
Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

Ryan Land: elected in Mystery Lake

Selinger says he and Bowman share several priorities

By Larry Kusch and Bruce Owen 4 minute read Preview

Selinger says he and Bowman share several priorities

By Larry Kusch and Bruce Owen 4 minute read Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

A change in leadership at city hall may signal a new, improved relationship between the province and Winnipeg.

Premier Greg Selinger said Thursday that he and mayor-elect Brian Bowman share several priorities, including a focus on infrastructure, safe neighbourhoods and rapid transit.

“Mayor Bowman got a mandate and that mandate focuses on things that we believe in and that gives us a lot of common ground,” Selinger told reporters after announcing a $2 million expansion to the welding shop at Sturgeon Heights Collegiate.

The premier faced questions on whether the civic election had been a rebuke of the provincial NDP. Judy Wasylycia-Leis, who appeared to lead the mayoral race until near the end, has strong NDP ties as a former provincial cabinet minister and member of parliament. She received help in her campaign from several people with close links to the provincial government.

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Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

Matt Goerzen/Brandon Sun
Premier Greg Selinger acknowledged many people don't support an inquiry into missing, slain women because they don't know how it will help .

Shelley Hart new mayor of East St. Paul

By Bill Redekop 2 minute read Preview

Shelley Hart new mayor of East St. Paul

By Bill Redekop 2 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Shelley Hart, a former deputy chief with the Winnipeg Police Service, is the new mayor of East St. Paul.

Hart won a fierce battle, edging councilor Barry Schreyer with 1,489 to 1,322 votes. Incumbent Lawrence Morris, finished third with 982 votes.

Also in the capital region, three of the new six-person council in the RM of Springfield are female, after last nights election: Heather Erickson, Shandy Walls, and Tiffany Fell, all newcomers.

One-term Springfield Reeve Jim McCarthy went down to defeat to Bob Bodnaruk, 2,927 to 1,469.

Read
Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Supplied photo
Shelley Hart

Bowman drops by News Café

1 minute read Preview

Bowman drops by News Café

1 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Fresh off his stunning landslide victory on Wednesday night, new Winnipeg mayor-elect Brian Bowman will visit the Free Press News Café at 11 a.m. today for a live and interactive chat with Free Press political columnist Dan Lett.

Come down to the cafe, or tune in live here at winnipegfreepress.com to hear Bowman talk about the campaign that was, and his plans for the future.

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Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Mayor-elect Brian Bowman in the News Café Thursday morning.

Out with old and in with new

By Bartley Kives 4 minute read Preview

Out with old and in with new

By Bartley Kives 4 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

The voters of Winnipeg demanded change and they got it on election night, plunking eight new posteriors into city council's 16 seats.

Half of the municipal status quo in this city was wiped away on Wednesday evening, as three incumbents were defeated and five new faces filled empty seats, including the mayor's chair.

In Elmwood-East Kildonan, troubled one-term councillor Thomas Steen was soundly thrashed by the NDP-affiliated Jason Schreyer, son of former premier and Gov. Gen. Ed Schreyer.

In St. Charles, two-term Tory councillor Grant Nordman, another Katz loyalist, was defeated by the apparently unaligned Shawn Dobson.

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Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press
Thomas Steen (above) lost his seat to Jason Schreyer in Elmwood-East Kildonan.

The vote results

1 minute read Preview

The vote results

1 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Brian Bowman

47.5 per cent

111,504 votes

 

Read
Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press
Judy Wasylycia-Leis

Second time’s a charm for Gilroy

By Martin Cash 3 minute read Preview

Second time’s a charm for Gilroy

By Martin Cash 3 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

CINDY Gilroy prevailed this time, after coming so close in 2010, to win the crowded Daniel McIntyre council race by 591 votes over runner-up Keith Bellamy.

Incumbent and longtime councillor Harvey Smith came in third at 3,284.

"People were really ready for a change," said Gilroy, 41. "We really knocked on the doors this time. That was the big difference over 2010."

She said infrastructure needs, affordable housing and social concerns including issues pertaining to the sex trade were some of the ward's key issues.

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Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Jason Halstead / Winnipeg Free Press
Cindy Gilroy celebrates with supporters Wednesday night.

Orlikow exterminates high-profile challenger

By Jessica Botelho-Urbanski 2 minute read Preview

Orlikow exterminates high-profile challenger

By Jessica Botelho-Urbanski 2 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Incumbent John Orlikow beat popular former city entomologist Taz Stuart to claim the River Heights-Fort Garry seat for a third time.

Orlikow earned 11,856 votes, while Stuart finished with 9,355. He celebrated with about 50 supporters, including former Liberal Party leader Jon Gerrard, at Mona Lisa Ristorante Italiano.

"I just focused on what we believed and what I've heard for the last four years," Orlikow said. "I'm really looking forward to serving the neighbourhood again."

Stuart held a results party at the Pembina Hotel with about a dozen supporters. The mood was less jovial, but the drinks were cheaper.

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Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Jason Halstead
Orlikow

Morantz aims to clean up city hall

By Carol Sanders 2 minute read Preview

Morantz aims to clean up city hall

By Carol Sanders 2 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

FOR newcomer Marty Morantz, the joy of winning the seat in Charleswood-Tuxedo was tempered by the tragic events that unfolded in the nation's capital Wednesday.

As volunteers and supporters cheered, Morantz thanked his supporters and volunteers, then expressed his condolences to the family of the Canadian soldier shot dead in Ottawa Wednesday.

"It's been a very exciting day and I'm thrilled with the outcome," said Morantz, 52.

"It's been a difficult and very serious day in our country," he said, reminding his audience about the sacrifices members of the military have made over time to protect Canada and its democracy.

Read
Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

FOR newcomer Marty Morantz, the joy of winning the seat in Charleswood-Tuxedo was tempered by the tragic events that unfolded in the nation's capital Wednesday.

As volunteers and supporters cheered, Morantz thanked his supporters and volunteers, then expressed his condolences to the family of the Canadian soldier shot dead in Ottawa Wednesday.

"It's been a very exciting day and I'm thrilled with the outcome," said Morantz, 52.

"It's been a difficult and very serious day in our country," he said, reminding his audience about the sacrifices members of the military have made over time to protect Canada and its democracy.

Minister to preach at political pulpit

By Ashley Prest 4 minute read Preview

Minister to preach at political pulpit

By Ashley Prest 4 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

HE is used to preaching to the masses and Scott Gillingham will now have the chance to speak to the entire city.

Gillingham, an ordained minister, was elected the new councillor in the open St. James-Brooklands ward Wednesday night and his supporters had no doubt what swayed the vote his way.

"It's his integrity," said Carole Tattersall, a Gillingham campaign volunteer. "He's just such an honest person who really wants to hear your concerns and do something about it. People could see that."

Only 45 minutes after the polls closed, Gillingham was declared the winner in the St. James-Brooklands ward and will be a first-time councillor in the open ward.

Read
Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

HE is used to preaching to the masses and Scott Gillingham will now have the chance to speak to the entire city.

Gillingham, an ordained minister, was elected the new councillor in the open St. James-Brooklands ward Wednesday night and his supporters had no doubt what swayed the vote his way.

"It's his integrity," said Carole Tattersall, a Gillingham campaign volunteer. "He's just such an honest person who really wants to hear your concerns and do something about it. People could see that."

Only 45 minutes after the polls closed, Gillingham was declared the winner in the St. James-Brooklands ward and will be a first-time councillor in the open ward.

Bowman was able to grow

By Dan Lett 8 minute read Preview

Bowman was able to grow

By Dan Lett 8 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

No matter how you look at it, the proximity between the campaign headquarters for Judy Wasylycia-Leis and Brian Bowman is hard to explain.

The two offices are located on opposite sides of Portage Avenue, separated by about the length of a Canadian football field. This odd reality seems now to be such an obvious sign that these two candidates were destined to go head to head for the mayor's office.

In many ways, you could not have two more different candidates battling each other at the end: a political veteran of 14 campaigns looking for redemption for the 2010 failure; and a political neophyte dipping his toe for the first time into electoral waters.

Two very different candidates, with two very different campaigns.

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Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press
Judy Wasylycia-Leis makes her way through her crowd of supporters to the stage to give her concession speech after losing to Brian Bowman in her bid to become Winnipeg's 43rd mayor.

Schreyer skates to win over Steen

By Bruce Owen 3 minute read Preview

Schreyer skates to win over Steen

By Bruce Owen 3 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

The 47-year-old son of former NDP premier Ed Schreyer beat former Winnipeg Jet Thomas Steen last night to become the new councillor for Elmwood-East Kildonan.

Jason Schreyer led by a margin of more than 55 per cent of the vote the moment polls closed.

Helping him on this night was his dad, pressed into service as a scrutineer as soon as he walked in the door of Jason's campaign headquarters.

"Dad's been helping me my whole life," he said, adding he's been actively campaigning for about a year-and-a-half.

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Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press FILES
Meet Jason Schreyer, the new councillor for Elmwood-East Kildonan.

Voter turnout

1 minute read Preview

Voter turnout

1 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

VOTER turnout this year was Winnipeg's highest since 2004, when Sam Katz won a wide-open byelection race for mayor.

On Wednesday, 235,454 of Winnipeg's 468,713 eligible voters voted in the 2014 general election, Senior Election Official Marc Lemoine said. That translates into a voter turnout of 50.2 per cent.

"We always want 100 per cent, but that's not realistic. We had over 50 per cent and long lines to vote at some locations, so I'm happy," Lemoine said.

This year's turnout edges the 47.1-per-cent turnout in 2010, when the incumbent Katz went head-to-head with Judy Wasylycia-Leis. It is not as high as the 58.8-per-cent mark achieved in 2004.

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Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

VOTER turnout this year was Winnipeg's highest since 2004, when Sam Katz won a wide-open byelection race for mayor.

On Wednesday, 235,454 of Winnipeg's 468,713 eligible voters voted in the 2014 general election, Senior Election Official Marc Lemoine said. That translates into a voter turnout of 50.2 per cent.

"We always want 100 per cent, but that's not realistic. We had over 50 per cent and long lines to vote at some locations, so I'm happy," Lemoine said.

This year's turnout edges the 47.1-per-cent turnout in 2010, when the incumbent Katz went head-to-head with Judy Wasylycia-Leis. It is not as high as the 58.8-per-cent mark achieved in 2004.

Progressive candidates win big in WSD

By Nick Martin 3 minute read Preview

Progressive candidates win big in WSD

By Nick Martin 3 minute read Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

The right-wing revolution didn't come to Winnipeg School Division's board Wednesday night.

With six incumbents not returning, and a new single-seat ward system in play, anything could have happened.

But voters returned a majority of trustees likely to carry on the progressive policies and programs of the province's largest division -- educating more than 18 per cent of Manitoba's public-school students.

Maverick Mike Babinsky will be back for a sixth term, along with left-leaning Mark Wasyliw and Cathy Collins.

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Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014

The right-wing revolution didn't come to Winnipeg School Division's board Wednesday night.

With six incumbents not returning, and a new single-seat ward system in play, anything could have happened.

But voters returned a majority of trustees likely to carry on the progressive policies and programs of the province's largest division -- educating more than 18 per cent of Manitoba's public-school students.

Maverick Mike Babinsky will be back for a sixth term, along with left-leaning Mark Wasyliw and Cathy Collins.

Capital-region voters send law-and-order message

By Bill Redekop 2 minute read Preview

Capital-region voters send law-and-order message

By Bill Redekop 2 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014

Voters sent a strong law-and-order message in capital region municipalities on Winnipeg's northeast flank.

In St. Andrews, voters elected ex-cop George Pike. Incumbent Don Forfar did not stand for re-election.

Pike is the former superintendent of District 3 in Winnipeg's North End, and was then head of security at Canad Inn.

In East St. Paul, Shelley Hart, the former deputy chief with the Winnipeg Police Service, was leading Barry Schreyer by about 150 votes at press time. Incumbent Lawrence Morris was running third.

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Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014

Voters sent a strong law-and-order message in capital region municipalities on Winnipeg's northeast flank.

In St. Andrews, voters elected ex-cop George Pike. Incumbent Don Forfar did not stand for re-election.

Pike is the former superintendent of District 3 in Winnipeg's North End, and was then head of security at Canad Inn.

In East St. Paul, Shelley Hart, the former deputy chief with the Winnipeg Police Service, was leading Barry Schreyer by about 150 votes at press time. Incumbent Lawrence Morris was running third.

Lukes wins boss’ vacated seat in St. Norbert

Randy Turner 3 minute read Preview

Lukes wins boss’ vacated seat in St. Norbert

Randy Turner 3 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014

After years as a grassroots, volunteer community activist, Janice Lukes is about to find out what it’s like on the inside.

The community fundraiser - who was a long-time thorn in the sides of elected municipal officials - won the St. Norbert riding in a decisive victory over main challenger Sachit Mehra. Lukes will take the seat previously held by Justin Swandel.

In fact, Lukes had served as a community assistant under Swandel for recent years, along with serving as director of the Winnipeg Trails Association.

“People always said to me, ‘You should run (for council),'” Lukes joked on Wednesday night. “I said, ‘No way! There might be another me out there (poking).

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Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014

DAVID LIPNOWSKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Janice Lukes at her campaign headquarters on Wednesday.

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