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The politics behind ethnic advertising during an election

'you are actually appealing to the people who own that newspaper or magazine'

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 12/10/2015 (1341 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Beyond the standard radio ads, commercials and mainstream print ads, there’s another highly targeted advertising resource at political parties’ fingertips: ethnic newspapers.

Ethnic newspaper advertising has been heavily used by Winnipeg Liberal candidates such as Winnipeg North incumbent Kevin Lamoureux, whose riding includes a large population of Filipinos and aboriginals.

Meanwhile, the Conservative party has run a banner ad for Winnipeg South Centre candidate Joyce Bateman in three consecutive issues of the Jewish Post and News, boasting Stephen Harper’s record on Israel, targeting the coveted Jewish vote that is concentrated in her riding.

The NDP candidates have been a little quieter, with Churchill–Keewatinook Aski NDP candidate Niki Ashton placing ads in the aboriginal newspaper the Grassroots News, and Kildonan-St. Paul candidate Suzanne Hrynyk advertising in the Ukrainian Voice.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 12/10/2015 (1341 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Major political parties have turned to ethnic newspapers for hyper-targeted advertising during the national election.

GRAEME BRUCE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Major political parties have turned to ethnic newspapers for hyper-targeted advertising during the national election.

Beyond the standard radio ads, commercials and mainstream print ads, there’s another highly targeted advertising resource at political parties’ fingertips: ethnic newspapers.

Ethnic newspaper advertising has been heavily used by Winnipeg Liberal candidates such as Winnipeg North incumbent Kevin Lamoureux, whose riding includes a large population of Filipinos and aboriginals.

Meanwhile, the Conservative party has run a banner ad for Winnipeg South Centre candidate Joyce Bateman in three consecutive issues of the Jewish Post and News, boasting Stephen Harper’s record on Israel, targeting the coveted Jewish vote that is concentrated in her riding.

The NDP candidates have been a little quieter, with Churchill–Keewatinook Aski NDP candidate Niki Ashton placing ads in the aboriginal newspaper the Grassroots News, and Kildonan-St. Paul candidate Suzanne Hrynyk advertising in the Ukrainian Voice.

There are three types of voters in every election that ads speak to: the slam dunks (those who will vote for your party regardless), the swing vote (those who you can sway), and the dead ducks (those who are slam dunks for the opposition), according to Toronto-based brand strategist Tony Chapman.

"For decades the Liberals were almost a slam dunk with the ethnic vote, just because of their immigration policies. But last election the Conservatives did a good job in winning a lot of them over because of their position on terrorists," Chapman said.

Advertising within specialized media outlets such as an ethnic newspaper it about letting the community know you are paying attention to their issues, which is why the party leaders and candidates will often wish people a Happy Rosh Hashanah or a blessed Eid Mubarak, Chapman explain. Also, it is a way to reach out to the highly influential editorial board of a publication, to get them in a party or candidate’s favour.

"When you go to ethnic markets, it is not so much about how many people listen to a station or read the paper, you are actually appealing to the people who own that newspaper or magazine," he said.

The Free Press analyzed recent issues of various ethnic newspapers, as well as the Grassroots News, Manitoba’s largest aboriginal newspaper, to see which party and candidates advertised in which publication.

Here’s what we discovered:

This Conservative ad ran in the Jewish Post and News.

This Conservative ad ran in the Jewish Post and News.

The Jewish Post and News, Sept. 16 and Sept. 30

Riding in Winnipeg with largest Jewish population: Heavily concentrated in Winnipeg South Centre, where they represent about seven per cent of the population.

Political advertisements:

  • Winnipeg South Centre Conservative candidate Joyce Bateman, a lower banner ad with the quote from Stephen Harper, "Through Fire and Water, Canada will stand with Israel." Published in the Aug. 19, Sept. 16 and Sept. 30 issue.
  • Winnipeg South Centre candidate Jim Carr, wishing his "family, friends and neighbours a happy and healthy New Year." Published on Sept. 16 after Rosh Hashanah. An Aug. 5 issue of the paper, issued right after the writ dropped featured ads from NDP candidate Matt Henderson and Carr, congratulating the performers and volunteers from the Israel Pavilion.

The Filipino Journal, Sept. 20 and Oct. 5 edition

Riding in Winnipeg with largest Filipino population: Winnipeg North, 28 per cent of the riding’s population, followed by Winnipeg Centre (20 per cent) and Kildonan-St. Paul (seven per cent).

Political advertisements:

  • The Liberal party took out a full-page ad, advertising Justin Trudeau as well as local candidates Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg North), Robert-Falcon Ouellette (Winnipeg Centre) and MaryAnn Mihychuk (Kildonan-St. Paul) in its Sept. 20 edition.
  • The Conservative party took out a half-page ad for Elmwood-Transcona candidate Lawrence Toet in its Oct. 5 edition. About four per cent of the population in Elmwood-Transcona is Filipino.

Grassroots News, Sept. 23 and Oct. 7 edition

This Liberal ad appeared in Grassroots, an aboriginal newspaper, highlighting the party's candidates running in ridings with high aboriginal populations.

This Liberal ad appeared in Grassroots, an aboriginal newspaper, highlighting the party's candidates running in ridings with high aboriginal populations.

Riding in Winnipeg with largest indigenous population: Winnipeg North (18 per cent of population) and Winnipeg Centre (17 per cent of population). Outside of Winnipeg, ridings such as Churchill-Keewatinook Aski have 72 per cent aboriginal population and Dauphin-Swan River-Marquette has 25 per cent.

Political advertisements:

  • An advertorial by Churchill-Keewatinook Aski Liberal candidate Rebecca Chartrand about the Liberal plan for employment insurance, more affordable housing and a plan for youth jobs.
  • A half-page ad by Churchill–Keewatinook Aski NDP candidate Niki Ashton, calling to "re-elect a strong voice from our North."
  • A full-page in the Oct. 7 edition, featuring Chartrand, Lamoureux (Winnipeg North), and Ouellette (Winnipeg Centre).
  • A quarter-page ad by Selkirk-Interlake-Eastman Liberal candidate Joanne Levy, stating the Liberal party will honour the treaties and Truth and Reconciliation Committee and provide housing and clean drinking water.

Ukrainian Voice, Aug. 24 and Sept. 21 edition

This NDP ad for Kildonan-St. Paul candidate Suzanne Hrynyk ran in the Ukrainian Voice.

This NDP ad for Kildonan-St. Paul candidate Suzanne Hrynyk ran in the Ukrainian Voice.

Riding in Winnipeg with largest Ukrainian population: Ukrainians are scattered almost evenly throughout Winnipeg, with roughly 10 to 15 per cent of population from a Ukrainian ethnic origin in each riding. However, they rank the highest in Kildonan-St. Paul and Elmwood-Transcona with 25 per cent and 20 per cent, respectively.

Political advertisements:

  • Quarter-page ad for Kildonan-St. Paul candidate Suzanne Hrynyk, touting her experience in health care and labour relations.
  • A smaller ad for Lamoureux (in both issues), with just his name, photo and Liberal banner.

The Free Press also looked the Manitoba Chinese News, the World Chinese Business Post, La Liberté, and The Seniors Scope and found no political ads in this month or last month’s issues.

kristin.annable@freepress.mb.ca

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History

Updated on Monday, October 12, 2015 at 9:52 PM CDT: Slight changing to subheads

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