Manitobans woke up to a new political era as the Progressive Conservatives will return to power after almost 17 years on the sidelines.

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This article was published 20/4/2016 (2055 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Manitobans woke up to a new political era as the Progressive Conservatives will return to power after almost 17 years on the sidelines.

Tory Leader Brian Pallister campaigned on a platform that called for rolling back the provincial sales tax, a promise to "spend smarter" and to find $50 million in savings through a review of government operations.

All told, the Tories’ campaign promises would cost $116.9 million in the first full year of government. But beyond what was promised, here is what Manitobans will see in the early days of the Pallister government.

❚ He’s expected to name a cabinet within two weeks and call a spring session of the legislature. The cabinet will be smaller than what Manitoba has seen in a long time. Pallister has promised to reduce it by one-third.

❚ He will introduce bills to abolish a subsidy, introduced by the NDP, that subsidizes political parties for operating expenses based on how many votes they receive in elections. His government will also table a bill that would allow for more sharing of information between police, government and CFS agencies.

❚ He will restore the right for citizens to vote on major tax increases.

❚ The new PC government will initiate several studies and reviews to lessen health-care waits and look for waste within government.

❚ He will establish a task force to recommend ways to address emergency-room wait times. They will have half a year to produce a report. Also expect early action on a promise to cut ambulance fees in half and an early commitment to boost tourism.

❚ He will ask the Public Utilities Board to examine Manitoba Hydro’s Bipole III transmission line project.

larry.kusch@freepress.mb.ca

 

Larry Kusch

Larry Kusch
Legislature reporter

Larry Kusch didn’t know what he wanted to do with his life until he attended a high school newspaper editor’s workshop in Regina in the summer of 1969 and listened to a university student speak glowingly about the journalism program at Carleton University in Ottawa.