The Winnipeg Free Press editorial board made a decision in 2014 to become transparent in how it conducts its editorial boards. They are now livestreamed and held in public at the Free Press News Café so the questions asked and answered are available for everyone to see and to make their own evaluations.

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This article was published 16/3/2016 (2044 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

The Winnipeg Free Press editorial board made a decision in 2014 to become transparent in how it conducts its editorial boards. They are now livestreamed and held in public at the Free Press News Café so the questions asked and answered are available for everyone to see and to make their own evaluations.

In preparation for the April 19 provincial election, the editorial board met with the leaders of each party holding seats in the Manitoba legislature. The three leaders were provided the opportunity to speak about their party’s record and to lay out their plans for government.

It was not always an easy exchange – at times combative and aggressive, at time conciliatory and accepting – but these sessions provide our readers with an opportunity to see how each of these leaders performed and what they had to say: without editing, without mediation.

Liberal Rana Bokhari led off the party leader meetings with the editorial board, telling a small gathering at the News Cafe on March 8 that, under her leadership, the Liberal Party of Manitoba was now more open and welcoming. That caused some head-scratching. She had trouble enunciating her policy positions, too.

 

Next up was Tory Brian Pallister who on March 10 reiterated that nurses, teachers or front-line public servant would not be cut from the payroll under his government - but middle and senior managers might, he said, because Manitoba's public service is top heavy.

 

Finally, Greg Selinger conceded on March 14 that his own (low) popularity was a hindrance to the NDP. He said the PST hike was his idea, poorly rolled out and still hurting his party. But his message was that Manitobans should not let old grievances send their province down a risky, cost-cutting (Tory) path.