October 19, 2019

Winnipeg
7° C, Partly cloudy

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Liberals' Lamoureux and NDP veteran Marcelino headline battle for Tyndall Park

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES</p><p>Liberal candidate and Burrows MLA Cindy Lamoureux credits her father, Winnipeg North MP Kevin Lamoureux, for her ambition to be a politician.</p></p>

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

Liberal candidate and Burrows MLA Cindy Lamoureux credits her father, Winnipeg North MP Kevin Lamoureux, for her ambition to be a politician.

A chess tournament that pits young students against senior residents is an annual tradition in Tyndall Park.

Now, New Democrat MLA Ted Marcelino, the tournament’s founder and the constituency’s reigning “king,” is caught up in his own version of the game. The high-stakes contest has a savvy veteran and an optimistic rookie both plotting to pull off a campaign-trail checkmate and steal the other’s crown.

Liberal Cindy Lamoureux, who was elected in Burrows, is running in Tyndall Park, the area where she grew up, which has been represented by Marcelino since 2011. She decided to make the switch because of changes to constituency boundaries, which take effect in this election. The 27-year-old won the Burrows seat in 2016, following in the footsteps of her father, Kevin Lamoureux, who was an MLA for years and has been the Winnipeg North MP since 2010.

(pullQuoteFull)

A chess tournament that pits young students against senior residents is an annual tradition in Tyndall Park.

Now, New Democrat MLA Ted Marcelino, the tournament’s founder and the constituency’s reigning "king," is caught up in his own version of the game. The high-stakes contest has a savvy veteran and an optimistic rookie both plotting to pull off a campaign-trail checkmate and steal the other’s crown.

Liberal Cindy Lamoureux, who was elected in Burrows, is running in Tyndall Park, the area where she grew up, which has been represented by Marcelino since 2011. She decided to make the switch because of changes to constituency boundaries, which take effect in this election. The 27-year-old won the Burrows seat in 2016, following in the footsteps of her father, Kevin Lamoureux, who was an MLA for years and has been the Winnipeg North MP since 2010.

The race is playing out in the Inkster Gardens, Meadows West, Tyndall Park and Garden Grove neighbourhoods. Nearly 40 per cent of the population is Filipino while about 13 per cent of constituents have South Asian origins.

Only one will resume work at the Manitoba legislature after the Sept. 10 election — unless Progressive Conservative hopeful Daljit Kainth snags the seat out from under the two experienced MLAs. The self-described political rookie said he thinks his community is ready to ride a blue wave. And despite well-known names on the ballot, some constituents think a split vote between the competitive NDP and Liberal candidates could make room for a Tory to win.

The race is playing out in the Inkster Gardens, Meadows West, Tyndall Park and Garden Grove neighbourhoods. Nearly 40 per cent of the population is Filipino while about 13 per cent of constituents have South Asian origins. In talking with candidates and constituents, health care and crime are top of mind this election.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES</p><p>Tyndall Park’s incumbent NDP MLA Ted Marcelino (right), seen here with family friend Poy Garcia (centre) and granddaughter Lauren Geli, is seeking a third term.</p>

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

Tyndall Park’s incumbent NDP MLA Ted Marcelino (right), seen here with family friend Poy Garcia (centre) and granddaughter Lauren Geli, is seeking a third term.

Sitting at a table near the Philippine Canadian Centre of Manitoba restaurant, Marcelino talks about safety in the community. "It’s one of my regrets that I couldn’t do anything about (the meth crisis)," the 72-year-old said.

Marcelino is seeking a third term to maintain what has been a New Democrat stronghold since the constituency was established a decade ago.

The grandfather of 11 has been a Winnipegger since immigrating from Manila in 1980. When he left the Philippines, his career as a defence lawyer ended. In Winnipeg, he took jobs ranging from tire re-treader to 7-Eleven clerk.

After hours, he made himself known in his community by volunteering as counsel for the Immigration and Refugee Board and taking in newcomers who had nowhere to go. During an interview with the Free Press between doorknocking sessions, Marcelino proudly recalls housing newcomers for months.

"I go to the airport even and ask those new recruits for (the) garment industry if they have a place to stay — and we ask them to stay with us, for free," he said. "From the Philippines especially, those who do not have anybody here.

"It’s unconditional. They can stay for as long as they want, sometimes five, six months, sometimes a year."

Days earlier, Lamoureux was dipping her french fries into an Oreo McFlurry as she waited for constituents at her Monday night McDonald’s post. "That’s one of the big things you hear at the door — people want politicians to be accessible and that’s fair, we need to be able to hear what’s going on in the community," she said in between bites.

It’s a weekly, year-round ritual that gives residents the chance to drop in to discuss their concerns. It’s also one she adopted from her father, whom she credits for her ambition to be a politician. Before being elected, she worked at the Long Term and Continuing Care Association of Manitoba.

The Lamoureux father-daughter duo worked together on certain files that concerned both provincial and federal jurisdiction during her stint as Burrows MLA. They even shared some staff. Lamoureux said the two attend gurdwara, a Sikh temple, together in the community once a month. "I never take it for granted. The communities have been incredibly welcoming to both my father and I," she said about her Filipino and South Asian neighbours.

MIKE SUDOMA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES</p><p>PC candidate Daljit Kainth, seen here with nephew Ranvir Garcia, is ‘confident’ of a win.</p></p>

MIKE SUDOMA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

PC candidate Daljit Kainth, seen here with nephew Ranvir Garcia, is ‘confident’ of a win.

Meanwhile, Kainth is an active volunteer in the city’s Indian community. A business owner and financial planner by day, the 40-year-old father is vice-president of the India Association of Manitoba and a Folklorama pavilion co-ordinator.

The PC candidate, who immigrated to Winnipeg in 2006, said he’s "very confident" about next month’s outcome because the residents he has talked to while doorknocking are pleased with the Pallister government’s first term. He plans to win their votes on a platform to renovate the community centre and improve transit.

Lamoureux is focused on expanding Seven Oaks General Hospital services while Marcelino has made recreation improvements his priority.

"This is my Tyndall Park and nobody else’s," Marcelino said, followed by a chuckle. He remains confident despite the fact he considered not running for re-election. He hauled two truckloads of campaign signs to Mother Earth Recycling after his wife had two heart attacks this year. Then he changed his mind.

When the legislature was in session, Marcelino says he was approached by Lamoureux and asked if he planned to run again in Tyndall Park because if he did, she wouldn’t. Marcelino recalls he told her he would let her know, but before he did, Lamoureux announced her campaign.

"At my age, I don’t want to be pushed out of contention like I’m useless, easy to take on," he said. "From my point of view, I’m enjoying this job. I love serving this community that I have been blessed to be a part of over the last 40 years and this is my way of saying thank you, make use of (me)."

Lamoureux said Marcelino’s decision to run wouldn’t have affected hers and that she had no idea he was upset. It was a casual conversation between two politicians, she said. "Tito (uncle in Tagalog) Ted is someone I respect very much."

maggie.macintosh@freepress.mb.ca

Twitter: @macintoshmaggie

Maggie Macintosh

Maggie Macintosh
Reporter

Maggie is a cub reporter who covers every beat in the newsroom. She appreciates alliteration, when newspaper ink stains her fingertips and, more importantly, tips on social and environmental equity issues.

Read full biography

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us