If you’ve ever wondered where the term "media circus" comes from, look no further than the crush of videographers, photographers and reporters gathered at the Manitoba Legislature Wednesday morning as Premier Greg Selinger officially called the 2016 provincial election.

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This article was published 17/3/2016 (2043 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

If you’ve ever wondered where the term "media circus" comes from, look no further than the crush of videographers, photographers and reporters gathered at the Manitoba Legislature Wednesday morning as Premier Greg Selinger officially called the 2016 provincial election.

As is customary, the premier left his office in the Legislature, marched down the hallway, down the grand staircase, out the front door and across the parking lot to the Lieutenant Governor’s official residence (currently occupied by Lt.-Gov. Janice Filmon). And surrounding Selinger like a piranha feeding frenzy, local and national media were eager to capture his journey, by means of video, photos and a whole bunch of smartphones and tablets.

"Making you guys work aren’t I?" quipped Selinger at the beginning of his journey, obviously trying not to walk too fast for fear of photographers tripping down the grand staircase. "Can you take a picture backing up?"

WAYNE GLOWACKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>NDP Leader Greg Selinger speaks Wednesday after the election was called, surrounded by supporters and members of the media.</p>

WAYNE GLOWACKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

NDP Leader Greg Selinger speaks Wednesday after the election was called, surrounded by supporters and members of the media.

For Selinger, the huge number of media following his every move is exactly what he wanted — a highly visual and picturesque walkabout showcasing him and his NDP team. If not for Fibber, the Pinnochio-like mascot of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, the walk would have been mission accomplished.

I captured the premier and his entourage using my Sony video camera with a GoPro also mounted on it. What you see from the video is the media capturing usable snippets of footage as the premier walks. Photographers and videographers then run to get ahead of him again to capture more. This happens over and over for seven minutes and forty seconds.

The raw video gives you an inside look at how the media covers an important event like this, but also provides some great entertainment value.

 

Editor’s Note: No journalists (or politicians) were harmed in the making of this video, but one did get a booter thanks to Janice Filmon’s flooded lawn.