Turnout in Tuesday's provincial election inched up ever so slightly compared to four years ago, initial results from Elections Manitoba suggest.

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This article was published 20/4/2016 (2016 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Turnout in Tuesday's provincial election inched up ever so slightly compared to four years ago, initial results from Elections Manitoba suggest.

With final tallies still being counted, a spokeswoman with Elections Manitoba says turnout was about 56.9 per cent of registered voters. That's up from 55.8 per cent in 2011, and ever so slightly higher than 56.8 per cent in 2007.

The turnout tally is based on an estimate of about 30,000 people signing on to vote on election day, which brought the number of registered voters to just shy of 750,000.

In all, 440,385 Manitobans cast a ballot in this election, compared to 433,346 who did so in 2011.

There was a significant increase in the number of people who declined their ballots. Only 440 people did that in 2011, while this time around, 4,016 people chose to decline their ballot. That is often considered to be a marker of people who are indicating they want none of the options running for office.

The number of rejected ballots also jumped by 65 per cent, to 2,462.

A quick analysis of some of the most competitive ridings suggest the NDP lost support to all other parties. This doesn't appear to be an election where huge swaths of  NDP voters sat on their hands rather than vote for someone else.

In Kildonan, where longtime MLA and cabinet minister Dave Chomiak lost to Tory Nic Curry, the number of votes cast increased by about 172. It appears Chomiak bled support to all of the other parties, with Curry picking up about half of the votes Chomiak lost, and the Liberals picking up a third.

In Thompson, where Steve Ashton was defeated by Tory Kelly Bindle in one of the night's most surprising upsets, again, slightly more votes were cast than in 2011. The Tories picked up about 60 per cent of the support Ashton lost, while the Liberals were the beneficiary of 40 per cent.

Actual turnout by riding won't be available for several days as Elections Manitoba is crunching the numbers of polling day registrations. All that is currently available is the unofficial tally of votes cast.