In short, Perry Floyd is doing everything he can to catch on with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers.

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This article was published 7/6/2011 (4046 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

In short, Perry Floyd is doing everything he can to catch on with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers.

Listed at 5-foot-8, 168 pounds -- and if there was ever a generous listing of a player's height, this would be it -- the 22-year-old rookie receiver from Wingate University has opened a few eyes this camp with his ability to separate from defensive backs and secure the ball when it comes his way.

JOE.BRYKSA@FREEPRESS.MB.CA
Receiver Perry Floyd has played against bigger opponents throughout his football career, so he�s not too worried about his shorter stature.

JOE.BRYKSA@FREEPRESS.MB.CA Receiver Perry Floyd has played against bigger opponents throughout his football career, so he�s not too worried about his shorter stature.

Heavy traffic, he makes the catch.

Out in the flat, he makes the catch.

Spotting up underneath, he makes the catch.

Roster spots aren't claimed after three days of training camp, but it's been a nice little effort put together by Floyd to this point.

"All you can do is your best out there," he said Tuesday. "I can't control how big I am or how big the other guys are. Guys have been taller than me since Pop Warner and I've never let it get me down."

What's interesting about Floyd -- who is closer to 5-foot-5 in stature -- is how he's managed to stand tall among a forest of Blue and Gold oak trees. Winnipeg hasn't bucked the CFL trend when it comes to drafting and signing large receivers, and the local pass-catching corps has come to resemble an NBA shoot-around over the years.

For example:

-- WR Greg Carr, at 6-foot-6, is the highest branch in the receiver group. Before Carr came around, WR Aaron Hargreaves (6-foot-5) was the top dog.

-- The club drafted WR Jade Etienne (6-foot-3) and WR Kito Poblah (6-foot-2) last month and free agent hopeful WR Damian Sherman (6-foot-4) is an imposing figure when he gets on the field.

-- Add veteran SB Terrence Edwards (6-foot-1) and sophomores WR Cory Watson and SB Terence Jeffers-Harris (both listed at 6-foot-2), and the suggestion is that size does matter.

Could spell big trouble for Floyd.

"There's going to be room for Perry Floyd if he's one of the best American players on offence," head coach Paul LaPolice explained, choosing his words carefully. "We don't really get into size. We're very fortunate -- the guys we drafted had good size and we thought they were very good -- but if there was a great 5-foot-10 football player, we'd take him."

That may be true, but in the next breath LaPolice points to the reasons a larger player would be more likely to find work as a receiver.

"Our quarterbacks certainly appreciate a guy you can spot the football to," the coach continued. "It's a lot harder to hit a guy who is 5-foot-6; there's a lot less surface area."

Bigger bodies can also go up and get a higher ball and do a better job of positioning themselves to receive a pass.

This doesn't mean Floyd is looking at low odds to crack the roster -- not at all. His return skills come highly touted and LaPolice mentioned him as a possible designated import when it comes time for those decisions, but he'll need to stay above the pack the rest of the camp.

Remember: Many thought Charles Roberts was too small and he still carved out a nice career in Winnipeg.

"People see my height and think I can't play, so that motivates me a bit," said Floyd, who averaged over 187 all-purpose yards per game last season (good for fourth in the NCAA). "The guys in camp here are just like myself -- they're trying to win a job. Hopefully, at the end of the day my size will be nothing but a number."

Training camp resumes today (10:30 a.m., Canad Inns Stadium).

adam.wazny@freepress.mb.ca