THE winning play Monday night at the MTS Centre was a Wildly lucky play in many respects -- a long slapshot going wide that clipped the skate of Winnipeg Jets defenceman Jay Harrison and went into his own net.

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THE winning play Monday night at the MTS Centre was a Wildly lucky play in many respects -- a long slapshot going wide that clipped the skate of Winnipeg Jets defenceman Jay Harrison and went into his own net.

Jets coach Paul Maurice, however, had no interest in a post-game discussion about bad luck.

"We'll look at it a little harder than that," Maurice said after his team fell 3-2 to the Minnesota Wild before another sellout downtown. "You've got to be careful about bad-luck ones, saying that.

"The puck gets to the net for a reason. You have to look at how they got their pucks to the net."

The Jets were not exactly cruising along but were in command of the game 2-0 early in the second period when the little items started to mount.

Defenceman Paul Postma, instead of leaving a certain-to-be-whistled puck alone because the Wild had contacted it with a high stick, tried to knife the puck to the neutral zone, but his clearing attempt was intercepted and turned directly into Ryan Carter's goal by Minnesota.

With 3:29 left in the period and just after the home team had nullified a fourth Minnesota power play, Justin Fontaine won a dash to the net and tied the game.

Minnesota Wild's Ryan Carter scores on Michael Hutchinson during the second period

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Minnesota Wild's Ryan Carter scores on Michael Hutchinson during the second period

With 21 seconds left in the second and the Jets getting the puck from an offensive-zone faceoff, it got away from them and turned up ice, resulting in Marco Scandella's shot that went in off Harrison. Even-steven if you're from Minnesota and saw Winnipeg's Andrew Ladd win last Saturday's overtime game with a shot that went in off the glass, the top of the net and Wild goalie John Curry's head.

"Little things you have to learn how to handle, unusual situations, not just Paul (Postma), but all the other four and what they're doing," Maurice said by way of explanation of another night of odd goals between these teams. "When that puck's dead, you've got to just don't touch it and change the body position. That guy has to have one easy out, one or two players who come in behind instead of hoping we're going forward with that puck.

"We're going to need to control those pucks. The second one's ours. We didn't backcheck the way we needed to on that play."

Jets winger Michael Frolik said after the game his line was at fault for some of the second-period mess.

"The first goal we gave up, that was off the high stick and we touched the puck and they ended up with the goal," Frolik said. "I think our line wasn't really good enough in the D zone.

"We gave up two goals, especially the late one with a couple of seconds left and we know it's our last shift of the period and we have to make sure they don't score. That was a bad story as a line."

Part of the bad story, Maurice said, was the Jets weren't as energetic on their own ice as he likes.

"We just didn't have enough drive in our legs to make some plays, to tighten the gap the way we like to," he said. "And again, it's 31-30 shots, they had some power-play shots on us five-on-three and it's a fairly evenly played game. You don't like that at home."

tim.campbell@freepress.mb.ca