A rush job doesn't look like a rush job because of the focus of True North Sports and Entertainment and his company, Reebok's Dominque Fillion said Tuesday at the unveiling of the Jets jerseys.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 6/9/2011 (3738 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

A rush job doesn't look like a rush job because of the focus of True North Sports and Entertainment and his company, Reebok's Dominque Fillion said Tuesday at the unveiling of the Jets jerseys.

"After the original brief, we were seven days in Winnipeg looking at various concepts with Mr. Chipman and the organization," Fillion said. "I think we ended up in a very good place."

The Winnipeg Jets released their new logo on Friday, July 22, 2011. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ho-Winnipeg Jets

CP

The Winnipeg Jets released their new logo on Friday, July 22, 2011. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ho-Winnipeg Jets

He said he felt the tension about the look when he was here early in the summer.

"In a creative environment, you always come across deadline challenges," he said. "We've done it in the past. We communicated it to them, that we've faced it before and always succeeded and have had great hits. We were extremely focused and Mr. Chipman and his organization were extremely focused."

Jets GM Kevin Cheveldayoff came away impressed with the process.

"I think what's been lost a little in the translation is that to get a jersey changed in the NHL takes 18 months," he said. "The reason is the process and all the different things that have to happen, deadlines and details and prototypes and stocking and all of it. But people from True North and from Reebok and the NHL have all worked extremely hard together to make this moment happen."

Fillion said True North was clear about its wishes from the beginning.

"Part of the original pitch was that they didn't want something that was overbuilt," he said. "They wanted simple and direct and timeless."

 

Verdict's still out on

Byfuglien boating case

 

WINNIPEG Jets defenceman Dustin Byfuglien has not yet been charged by the Lake Minnetonka Conservation District prosecuting attorney.

Byfuglien was arrested late last Wednesday in Minnesota and booked on suspicion of boating while under the influence of alchohol. He was not charged at the time and released.

A spokesperson at the conservation district office said Tuesday that there had been no decision made on what to do with the case because the prosecuting attorney, Steve Tallen, had not yet received police reports of the incident.

Byfuglien, a native Minnesotan, faces fines, possible jail time and no end of border-crossing headaches if he is convicted in the case.

tim.campbell@freepress.mb.ca