Kelvin High School is officially a track-and-field dynasty.

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This article was published 9/6/2018 (1200 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Kelvin High School is officially a track-and-field dynasty.

When the Manitoba provincial track and field championships came to a close Saturday evening, it was the Kelvin Clippers who stood atop the mountain as the province’s most athletic school. Kelvin was awarded the aggregate team banner, which is awarded to the school with the most overall points in all events. It’s the third year in a row the Clippers have stood on top of the podium with the banner.

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Kelvin Collegiate’s decathlete Cyrus Kyle leaps into a long jump in competition Saturday afternoon.</p>

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Kelvin Collegiate’s decathlete Cyrus Kyle leaps into a long jump in competition Saturday afternoon.

Grade 12 Kelvin athlete Max Speiser was a big help in his school claiming the top prize, as he finished the three-day event with three medals — gold in the 4x400 metre relay, bronze in the pentathlon and another bronze in high jump. The 17-year-old said him and his teammates came into the week expecting to repeat as champions.

"At our school, it’s a standard that it’s our goal every year to win the banner," said Speiser, who hopes to continue his track career next fall at the University of Manitoba.

"Especially being in Grade 12, we wanted to end on a high note and it just feels really good for all of us."

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Members of Kelvin’s Championship Track team show off their new banner Saturday afternoon.</p>

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Members of Kelvin’s Championship Track team show off their new banner Saturday afternoon.

Being one of the larger high schools in the province with more than 1,300 students definitely helps, but Speiser believes it’s the training outside of school that takes Kelvin’s track program to the next level.

"We have quite a few athletes, but the biggest difference between us and other schools is that we have a lot of people who train all throughout the year," Speiser said.

"We don’t just have a couple high level athletes, we got multiple high level athletes and good athletes in all four divisions. We have depth and that’s what wins these this banners."

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Kelvin Collegiate's Noel Kendle throws his teams championship banner over his shoulders and makes his way off the track after the award presentation Saturday afternoon.</p>

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Kelvin Collegiate's Noel Kendle throws his teams championship banner over his shoulders and makes his way off the track after the award presentation Saturday afternoon.

Junior varsity student Rofi Agboola, 15, who dominated provincials by winning gold in the girls triple jump and 4x100 m relay, agreed with Speiser. She said the work ethic of the students and the coaching of Tim Shynkaruk, who has been leading the program for the past 13 years, is what has set the program apart from the pack.

"A lot of kids at Kelvin are really dedicated to track and a lot of us do track outside of school," Agboola said.

"Most of us train with Optimist Athletics or Stride Ahead Tough Track, so we’re used to always practicing. Not a lot of people want to get wake up early in the morning to practice, but it’s what you got to do to get better."

Finishing in second place behind the Clippers was Garden City Collegiate with 181 points. Glenlawn Collegiate rounded out the podium in third place with 152 points.

taylor.allen@freepress.mb.caTwitter: @TaylorAllen31

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Kelvin Collegiate’s decathlete Robin Brooks lands a long jump in competition Saturday afternoon.</p>

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Kelvin Collegiate’s decathlete Robin Brooks lands a long jump in competition Saturday afternoon.

Taylor Allen

Taylor Allen
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Eighteen years old and still in high school, Taylor got his start with the Free Press on June 1, 2011. Well, sort of.

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