TOKYO - From a weightlifting gold to more excellence in the pool, here are five things to know from Tuesday at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Canada's Kylie Masse poses with her silver medal won in the women's 100m backstroke final event during the Tokyo Summer Olympic Games, in Tokyo, Tuesday, July 27, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Canada's Kylie Masse poses with her silver medal won in the women's 100m backstroke final event during the Tokyo Summer Olympic Games, in Tokyo, Tuesday, July 27, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

TOKYO - From a weightlifting gold to more excellence in the pool, here are five things to know from Tuesday at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

GOLDEN MAUDE

Maude Charron lifted Canada to its second gold medal of the Tokyo Games with an impressive performance in the women's 64-kilogram competition. Charron, from Rimouski, Que., had the top scores in both stages of the competition after lifting 105 kilograms in the snatch and 131 kilograms in the clean and jerk. Charron's medal was the eighth Canada has won so far at the games — all by women athletes. Canadian women also owned the podium at the 2016 Rio games, accounting for 16 of Canada's 22 medals.

MASSE EFFECT

Kylie Masse won Canada's third medal in the pool at the Tokyo Games with a silver in the women's 100-metre backstroke. She posted her second-fastest time ever — 57.72 seconds — but was caught at the wall by Australia's Kaylee McKeown. While the two-time world champion was hoping to top the podium, she said she's happy with the "upgrade" from the bronze she won at the 2016 Rio Olympics. "After such a crazy year, I don't think you can be too hard on yourself," the native of LaSalle, Ont., said. The only other women in the world to win multiple career medals in 100 backstroke are American Natalie Coughlin, Krisztina Egerszegi of Hungary and Kirsty Coventry of Zimbabwe.

SOFTBALL HISTORY

Canada picked up its first ever Olympic medal in softball with a 3-2 win over Mexico in the bronze-medal game. Kelsey Harshman drove in the go-ahead run on a sacrifice fly in the fifth inning. The victory ended a long quest for redemption for four veterans — Jenn Salling, Danielle Lawrie, Lauren Regula and Kaleigh Rafter — who were on the Canadian team that finished fourth at the 2008 Beijing Games. "It means everything. This is the best team and one of the best cultures I've ever been a part of," said Salling, who announced her retirement after the game.

MAT MEDALS

Canada went into the Tokyo Olympics never having won a medal in women's judo. That has changed quickly, with two bronze on the mat in two days. Catherine Beaucheman-Pinard is the latest decorated Canadian judoka. The native of St-Hubert, Que., took bronze in the women's under-63-kilogram competition with a win over Anriqueli Barrios of Venezuela. Beaucheman-Pinard pumped her fist and yelled in triumph after forcing Barrios to the mat. The result came a day after Jessica Klimkait of Whitby, Ont., won bronze in the under-57-kilogram event.

SO CLOSE

Canadian divers Meaghan Benfeito of Montreal and Caeli McKay of Calgary came achingly close to picking up Canada's second diving medal of the games. The duo finished fourth in the women's 10-metre synchronized platform competition, missing the podium by less than a point. The Canadians were second after three dives, but scored the lowest of the eight teams competing on their fourth. “I'm in shock," Benfeito said. "As proud as I am of our team, I think it's hard to come fourth, and especially by so little."

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 27, 2021.