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Gibson campaigns for Green Party leadership

Greg Vandermeulen 4 minute read 4:28 PM CST

A perennial Provencher Green Party candidate is competing for the leadership of the Green Party of Manitoba.

Janine Gibson, the co-founder of a solar powered co-op farm south of Steinbach was announced as one of four candidates competing for the top job, in a Jan. 20 press release.

“I wanted to reach out to other Manitobans who like myself are very concerned with the lack of accountability that our government is demonstrating in their care for our environment, for both social and environmental justice,” she said.

While Gibson is new to a party leadership campaign, she is no stranger to elections. She has represented the Green Party in seven federal elections in Provencher, from 2004 to 2021.

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Zhoda to welcome second little house on the prairie

Jordan Ross 2 minute read Preview

Zhoda to welcome second little house on the prairie

Jordan Ross 2 minute read 2:50 PM CST

Zhoda will get its second tiny home following a pair of votes by RM of La Broquerie council last Wednesday.

Tim Klassen appeared before council seeking two variances that would allow him to place a tiny home on a 3.5-acre rural residential property on Wall Street.

The first was to vary the minimum square footage for a single-family dwelling to 250 square feet from 800 square feet. The second was to vary the minimum width of a dwelling to 8.6 feet from 24 feet.

“I don’t need a big place to live in,” Klassen said.

Read
2:50 PM CST

Zhoda will get its second tiny home following a pair of votes by RM of La Broquerie council last Wednesday.

Tim Klassen appeared before council seeking two variances that would allow him to place a tiny home on a 3.5-acre rural residential property on Wall Street.

The first was to vary the minimum square footage for a single-family dwelling to 250 square feet from 800 square feet. The second was to vary the minimum width of a dwelling to 8.6 feet from 24 feet.

“I don’t need a big place to live in,” Klassen said.

Young players looking to build up SRSS girls basketball

Cassidy Dankochik 4 minute read Preview

Young players looking to build up SRSS girls basketball

Cassidy Dankochik 4 minute read 2:31 PM CST

It’s not often a high school varsity basketball team is lead by a grade 10 player offensively, but head over to the Steinbach Regional Secondary School gym to check out the girls team, that’s exactly what you’ll see.

Forward Lily Anderson is averaging a double-double (over 10 rebounds and points) for the Sabres, including a dominant performance during a 81-42 victory against the Léo-Rémillard Renards Jan. 25.

“If I take away that first Christmas tournament, then she’s definitely one of our strongest players in scoring and defense,” head coach Ray Algera said.

“She really has fire to take her game to the next level. It’s quite interesting to see your grade 10 player being one of your leaders from a scoring perspective.”

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2:31 PM CST

Steinbach girls varsity head coach Ray Algera watches as Tesfanesh Derksen goes up for a transition layup attempt while wearing the orange slides his team gifted him for Christmas. Algera said the team thinks the shoes are a good luck charm after they won their first post-Christmas tournament while wearing the "loud" shoes. (Cassidy Dankochik The Carillon)

COLUMN: Think Again – There’s no need to rename everything

Michael Zwaagstra 4 minute read Preview

COLUMN: Think Again – There’s no need to rename everything

Michael Zwaagstra 4 minute read 11:26 AM CST

As part of the ever-accelerating agenda to cancel all things deemed offensive, Sir John A. Macdonald’s name and likeness is rapidly disappearing from the public square. Even though he was Canada’s first prime minister and key architect of Confederation, his statues are being taken down and his name removed from buildings.

Macdonald’s critics argue that his role in establishing Indigenous residential schools and his racist views disqualify him from any place of honour in Canada today.

But here’s the problem. If you cancel Macdonald, why stop with him? If we judge 19th century people by 21st century standards, many historical Canadians held unacceptable views. Which is why a whole lot of other buildings will soon need new names.

For example, trustees for the Thames Valley District School Board in London, Ontario, recently voted to rename 12 schools named after historical figures with ties to racism or colonialism including Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Queen Victoria, Lord Elgin, Lord Nelson, Louis-Joseph de Montcalm and others.

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11:26 AM CST

As part of the ever-accelerating agenda to cancel all things deemed offensive, Sir John A. Macdonald’s name and likeness is rapidly disappearing from the public square. Even though he was Canada’s first prime minister and key architect of Confederation, his statues are being taken down and his name removed from buildings.

Macdonald’s critics argue that his role in establishing Indigenous residential schools and his racist views disqualify him from any place of honour in Canada today.

But here’s the problem. If you cancel Macdonald, why stop with him? If we judge 19th century people by 21st century standards, many historical Canadians held unacceptable views. Which is why a whole lot of other buildings will soon need new names.

For example, trustees for the Thames Valley District School Board in London, Ontario, recently voted to rename 12 schools named after historical figures with ties to racism or colonialism including Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Queen Victoria, Lord Elgin, Lord Nelson, Louis-Joseph de Montcalm and others.

Sod turned on Southeast Event Centre

Greg Vandermeulen 5 minute read Preview

Sod turned on Southeast Event Centre

Greg Vandermeulen 5 minute read 11:23 AM CST

Shovels dug into a fresh pile of dirt placed on the frozen ground outside the Centennial Arena in Steinbach Friday as dignitaries celebrated the ground-breaking, kicking off construction of the Southeast Event Centre.

At the newly estimated cost of $66.2 million, the facility was described as the “largest single project that this community has ever undertaken” by Steinbach Mayor Earl Funk.

Originally pegged as a $42.5 million project in 2019, tenders came in much higher with the lowest at $75.331 million. That changed to $61 million after city council was promised there would be $14.3 million in cost savings in November.

Through a combination of reserve funds, operating funds and debt the city will provide funding of $23.2 million, $25.5 million will come from private and community fundraising coordinated by the Southeast Events Group, and combined provincial and federal funds through the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program will total $17.5 million.

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11:23 AM CST

GREG VANDERMEULEN THE CARILLON

The dirt flies as dignitaries turn the sod officially kicking off construction of the Southeast Event Centre. Left, senior Jeff Penner of Verne Reimer Architecture, Steinbach councillors Jac Siemens, Damian Penner, Jake Hiebert, Bill Hiebert, Mayor Earl Funk, Steinbach MLA Kelvin Goertzen, Southeast Events Group president Grant Lazaruk, Steinbach Minor Hockey vice-president Joel Braun, and Andrew Coleman and Greg Richards of Graham Construction.

Experiencing Tanzania

4 minute read Preview

Experiencing Tanzania

4 minute read 2:00 AM CST

Wow! Wow! Wow! That’s what our guide Malaki Samuel kept saying as we encountered a huge migration of wildebeests and zebras on our recent safari in Tanzania. This is considered early in the year for the annual migration which begins in the southern Serengeti as the animals set off looking for greener grass to feed on. We must have seen nearly a million and a half zebras and wildebeests migrating together. It was just unbelievable!

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2:00 AM CST

Wow! Wow! Wow! That’s what our guide Malaki Samuel kept saying as we encountered a huge migration of wildebeests and zebras on our recent safari in Tanzania. This is considered early in the year for the annual migration which begins in the southern Serengeti as the animals set off looking for greener grass to feed on. We must have seen nearly a million and a half zebras and wildebeests migrating together. It was just unbelievable!

Davis, Canada golden at Lake Placid World University Games

Cassidy Dankochik 2 minute read Preview

Davis, Canada golden at Lake Placid World University Games

Cassidy Dankochik 2 minute read Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2023

For the first time since 2013, Team Canada’s men’s hockey team came away from the World University Games with a gold medal.

The Canucks were lead in part by Oakbank forward Brett Davis.

Davis, who currently plays for the University of Manitoba Bisons, had seven of Team Canada’s 48 goals in the tournament, including their second goal of the gold medal game.

Canada, playing the United States at the historic Lake Placid, New York, 1980 Arena, dominated their opponents from the start of the championship game despite a packed, partisan crowd urging the Americans on.

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Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2023

Team Canada celebrates winning a world University games medal on the historic Lake Placid ice. (USports Photo)

Gas thief drains fuel tank

Greg Vandermeulen 1 minute read Preview

Gas thief drains fuel tank

Greg Vandermeulen 1 minute read Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2023

Police are looking for a gas thief who drilled a hole into a fuel tank to drain it.

The vehicle owner reported the vandalism and theft on Friday, and police said they believe it happened between the evening of Jan. 19 and the afternoon of Jan. 20.

The incident occurred on the 100 block of Woodhaven Avenue in Steinbach and no surveillance footage or suspect description is available.

Anyone with information is asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP at 204-326-4452 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or www.manitobacrimestoppers.com.

Read
Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2023

Police are looking for a gas thief who drilled a hole into a fuel tank to drain it.

The vehicle owner reported the vandalism and theft on Friday, and police said they believe it happened between the evening of Jan. 19 and the afternoon of Jan. 20.

The incident occurred on the 100 block of Woodhaven Avenue in Steinbach and no surveillance footage or suspect description is available.

Anyone with information is asked to contact the Steinbach RCMP at 204-326-4452 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or www.manitobacrimestoppers.com.

Flight from police ends in jail sentence

Jordan Ross 3 minute read Preview

Flight from police ends in jail sentence

Jordan Ross 3 minute read Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2023

A man who tried to outrun the long arm of the law was handed a jail sentence last week in Steinbach provincial court, but it could have been a longer one had he been breathalyzed by Steinbach RCMP.

Larry Adams Friesen, 40, pleaded guilty last Thursday to dangerous driving, mischief over $5,000, flight from police, and failing to comply with a release order to refrain from being behind the wheel.

“You’re on your second page of your criminal record already. That’s worrisome,” Judge Larry Allen said as he sentenced Friesen to 314 days of time served and a one-year driving ban.

Defence lawyer Karl Gowenlock said Manitoba Public Insurance will likely ban Friesen from driving for life.

Read
Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2023

A man who tried to outrun the long arm of the law was handed a jail sentence last week in Steinbach provincial court, but it could have been a longer one had he been breathalyzed by Steinbach RCMP.

Larry Adams Friesen, 40, pleaded guilty last Thursday to dangerous driving, mischief over $5,000, flight from police, and failing to comply with a release order to refrain from being behind the wheel.

“You’re on your second page of your criminal record already. That’s worrisome,” Judge Larry Allen said as he sentenced Friesen to 314 days of time served and a one-year driving ban.

Defence lawyer Karl Gowenlock said Manitoba Public Insurance will likely ban Friesen from driving for life.

Pistons goalie Wasik commits to Air Force Academy Eagles

Cassidy Dankochik 1 minute read Preview

Pistons goalie Wasik commits to Air Force Academy Eagles

Cassidy Dankochik 1 minute read Monday, Jan. 30, 2023

Steinbach Pistons goaltender Dominik Wasik has added his name to the ever-growing list of Pistons committing to American universities this season.

Wasik, the 2002-born goaltender from Superior, Colo., will be heading back to his home state, signing up to play for the Air Force Academy Falcons, which are based out of Colorado Springs.

The netminder has a 14-7 record this season (his first in the Manitoba Junior Hockey League), with a 2.20 goals against and 0.925 save percentage, as the Pistons utilize Wasik in a goaltending tandem alongside Cole Plowman.

Five other Steinbach Pistons have committed to the NCAA this season, with Travis Hensrud, Nicholas Mikan, Warren Clark, Ty Paisley and Davis Fry all signing up to play for American post-secondary schools this season.

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Monday, Jan. 30, 2023

Dominik Wasik makes a save against Portage earlier this season. The Steinbach netminder has a record of 14-7 this season, and has recently committed to Air Force Academy of the NCAA. (Cassidy Dankochik The Carillon)

Steinbach to host budget engagement meeting

Greg Vandermeulen 2 minute read Preview

Steinbach to host budget engagement meeting

Greg Vandermeulen 2 minute read Monday, Jan. 30, 2023

Steinbach and area residents will have a chance to weigh in on the upcoming provincial budget in the second in-person session available.

The PC government announced the consultations Friday which are a mix of in-person, regional telephone town halls, and online surveys.

Finance Minister Cameron Friesen said they’re focused on the creation of jobs, providing accessible healthcare and making life more affordable for Manitobans.

“We’re listening to Manitoban families and want to hear from them,” he said in a press release. “To permit as many individuals to contribute as possible, we’re inviting all Manitobans to participate in telephone town halls or in-person engagement sessions.”

Read
Monday, Jan. 30, 2023

Steinbach and area residents will have a chance to weigh in on the upcoming provincial budget in the second in-person session available.

The PC government announced the consultations Friday which are a mix of in-person, regional telephone town halls, and online surveys.

Finance Minister Cameron Friesen said they’re focused on the creation of jobs, providing accessible healthcare and making life more affordable for Manitobans.

“We’re listening to Manitoban families and want to hear from them,” he said in a press release. “To permit as many individuals to contribute as possible, we’re inviting all Manitobans to participate in telephone town halls or in-person engagement sessions.”

COLUMN: Village News – Resurfacing: Mennonite floor patterns

Andrea Klassen, Senior Curator 4 minute read Preview

COLUMN: Village News – Resurfacing: Mennonite floor patterns

Andrea Klassen, Senior Curator 4 minute read Monday, Jan. 30, 2023

On Jan. 18, guests gathered in the Gerhard Ens Gallery at Mennonite Heritage Village (MHV) to open “Resurfacing: Mennonite Floor Patterns,” an exhibit by Margruite Krahn. Krahn is an artist based in Neubergthal and “Resurfacing” highlights 20 years of her research and artistic expression re-creating historical Mennonite floor patterns.

Inside the gallery, visitors can see 15 of Krahn’s original works of art that re-imagine and re-create historical Mennonite floor patterns found in old housebarns, mostly located in the former Mennonite West Reserve (around the Winkler, Morden area). Alongside the floor cloths, the exhibit includes a unique collage of photos taken of 36 historical patterns found by Krahn and Roland Sawatzky, Curator of History at the Manitoba Museum, during his PhD research on Mennonite housebarns. Despite the age and layers of paint shown on the floors in the photos, visitors with a keen eye will be able to find many of their historical patterns in Krahn’s artwork throughout the exhibit.

Rounding out the exhibit are artefacts, like a trap door from about 1910, found in the Klippenstein housebarn in Neubergthal, and a section of original floor boards from about 1912, found in the Herdsman’s House, also in the Neubergthal. The artefacts highlight the original floor patterns found in both buildings and feature both floral and geometric patterns. The trap door is particularly unique in that it demonstrates how floors were repeatedly re-painted with new patterns. It features numerous levels of paint and three different patterns, each painted over the last one.

At the opening, Krahn remarked that Mennonite floor patterns help to dispel the idea that Mennonites from the past were drab, austere people with no eye for beauty or need for creativity. Indeed, visitors walking into the gallery were struck by the vibrant colours and bold designs of the patterns on display. Krahn used her floor cloths to challenge the crowd at the opening to think about history differently and to question whether our commonly held ideas about history are actually true. Her comment brought to mind a sign I saw in Steinbach last year with this word of caution: “don’t believe everything you think.” I invite you to visit MHV to take in “Resurfacing,” on display now until April 1, and re-consider what you thought you knew about history.

Read
Monday, Jan. 30, 2023

On Jan. 18, guests gathered in the Gerhard Ens Gallery at Mennonite Heritage Village (MHV) to open “Resurfacing: Mennonite Floor Patterns,” an exhibit by Margruite Krahn. Krahn is an artist based in Neubergthal and “Resurfacing” highlights 20 years of her research and artistic expression re-creating historical Mennonite floor patterns.

Inside the gallery, visitors can see 15 of Krahn’s original works of art that re-imagine and re-create historical Mennonite floor patterns found in old housebarns, mostly located in the former Mennonite West Reserve (around the Winkler, Morden area). Alongside the floor cloths, the exhibit includes a unique collage of photos taken of 36 historical patterns found by Krahn and Roland Sawatzky, Curator of History at the Manitoba Museum, during his PhD research on Mennonite housebarns. Despite the age and layers of paint shown on the floors in the photos, visitors with a keen eye will be able to find many of their historical patterns in Krahn’s artwork throughout the exhibit.

Rounding out the exhibit are artefacts, like a trap door from about 1910, found in the Klippenstein housebarn in Neubergthal, and a section of original floor boards from about 1912, found in the Herdsman’s House, also in the Neubergthal. The artefacts highlight the original floor patterns found in both buildings and feature both floral and geometric patterns. The trap door is particularly unique in that it demonstrates how floors were repeatedly re-painted with new patterns. It features numerous levels of paint and three different patterns, each painted over the last one.

At the opening, Krahn remarked that Mennonite floor patterns help to dispel the idea that Mennonites from the past were drab, austere people with no eye for beauty or need for creativity. Indeed, visitors walking into the gallery were struck by the vibrant colours and bold designs of the patterns on display. Krahn used her floor cloths to challenge the crowd at the opening to think about history differently and to question whether our commonly held ideas about history are actually true. Her comment brought to mind a sign I saw in Steinbach last year with this word of caution: “don’t believe everything you think.” I invite you to visit MHV to take in “Resurfacing,” on display now until April 1, and re-consider what you thought you knew about history.

Immigrant student population continues to climb in HSD

Nicole Buffie 2 minute read Preview

Immigrant student population continues to climb in HSD

Nicole Buffie 2 minute read Monday, Jan. 30, 2023

The immigrant student population continues to rise in Hanover School Division.

Superintendent Shelley Amos said, as of Wednesday, over 150 pupils from other countries have transferred into the division since the beginning of the school year, nearly double the number from September.

Most students have settled at Clearspring Middle School and Stonybrook Middle School and the bulk of them have emigrated from Ukraine amid Russia’s invasion of the country, while others are coming from countries like Syria and the U.S.

“We have been responsive and added additional teachers in those two schools this year,” Amos said, adding many students have functional English and don’t require support staff.

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Monday, Jan. 30, 2023

The immigrant student population continues to rise in Hanover School Division.

Superintendent Shelley Amos said, as of Wednesday, over 150 pupils from other countries have transferred into the division since the beginning of the school year, nearly double the number from September.

Most students have settled at Clearspring Middle School and Stonybrook Middle School and the bulk of them have emigrated from Ukraine amid Russia’s invasion of the country, while others are coming from countries like Syria and the U.S.

“We have been responsive and added additional teachers in those two schools this year,” Amos said, adding many students have functional English and don’t require support staff.

Conservation checkstops net Southeast suspects

Greg Vandermeulen 2 minute read Preview

Conservation checkstops net Southeast suspects

Greg Vandermeulen 2 minute read Monday, Jan. 30, 2023

A pair of men from Southeast Manitoba were charged by Manitoba Conservation officers as part of an update released Friday.

The first incident took place on Oct. 10 near Paint Lake when conservation officers saw two vehicles travelling on a decommissioned rail bed. Two males were sitting on the sides of the truck bed. The driver of the truck told officers they were going fishing and hunting grouse. A firearm was located under a spare tire on the truck bed with one live round in the chamber. The magazine for the rifle was found on the truck bed. A Mitchell resident was issued a ticket for carrying or having a loaded firearm in a vehicle and the firearm was seized. He was issued a $486 ticket and received a one-year suspension of his big game and game bird hunting licences.

On Nov. 10, officers from Beausejour received a call from the Anola area reporting suspected poaching. The homeowner heard a gunshot close to her home and immediately after, she saw a white truck pull up and attempt to load a large-bodied animal before driving out of sight. Officers responded and observed a vehicle matching the description leaving the area. A vehicle stop was conducted and the officer observed fresh blood on the tailgate and on the truck driver, a resident of Linden. While the vehicle stop occurred, additional officers searched where the truck was first seen and found a freshly killed white-tailed deer. The truck was then seized. Officers were granted a search warrant for the truck and obtained blood and white-tailed deer hair samples for DNA comparison with the deer found in front of the residence. The matter remains under investigation.

Other incidents included hunting a game bird without a licence near Thompson, having a loaded firearm in a boat on Lynn Lake, failing to wear hunter orange near Gillam, hunting a game bird without a license, and hunting deer within 800 metres of a cervid bait.

Read
Monday, Jan. 30, 2023

A pair of men from Southeast Manitoba were charged by Manitoba Conservation officers as part of an update released Friday.

The first incident took place on Oct. 10 near Paint Lake when conservation officers saw two vehicles travelling on a decommissioned rail bed. Two males were sitting on the sides of the truck bed. The driver of the truck told officers they were going fishing and hunting grouse. A firearm was located under a spare tire on the truck bed with one live round in the chamber. The magazine for the rifle was found on the truck bed. A Mitchell resident was issued a ticket for carrying or having a loaded firearm in a vehicle and the firearm was seized. He was issued a $486 ticket and received a one-year suspension of his big game and game bird hunting licences.

On Nov. 10, officers from Beausejour received a call from the Anola area reporting suspected poaching. The homeowner heard a gunshot close to her home and immediately after, she saw a white truck pull up and attempt to load a large-bodied animal before driving out of sight. Officers responded and observed a vehicle matching the description leaving the area. A vehicle stop was conducted and the officer observed fresh blood on the tailgate and on the truck driver, a resident of Linden. While the vehicle stop occurred, additional officers searched where the truck was first seen and found a freshly killed white-tailed deer. The truck was then seized. Officers were granted a search warrant for the truck and obtained blood and white-tailed deer hair samples for DNA comparison with the deer found in front of the residence. The matter remains under investigation.

Other incidents included hunting a game bird without a licence near Thompson, having a loaded firearm in a boat on Lynn Lake, failing to wear hunter orange near Gillam, hunting a game bird without a license, and hunting deer within 800 metres of a cervid bait.

AS I SEE IT COLUMN: NHL’s spineless response to Flyers pride night debacle is embarrassing

James Loewen 4 minute read Preview

AS I SEE IT COLUMN: NHL’s spineless response to Flyers pride night debacle is embarrassing

James Loewen 4 minute read Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

To anyone who follows sports with any degree of interest, it should come as no surprise that the NHL does not exactly take the lead or considered to be visionary when it comes to cultural issues.

The NHL is beyond woeful in its treatment of concussions and head injuries in hockey. The science is settled. It’s not conjecture. It’s not speculation. It’s not wishful thinking. Repeated blows to the head can cause chronic traumatic encephalopathy, commonly referred to CTE. Yet the NHL consistently downplays this issue that is very much a matter of life and death, and says the science on head injuries isn’t clear.

It’s complete bunk, and everyone knows it.

Now comes the NHL’s completely tone-deaf response to a controversy that occurred last week when a player from the Philadelphia Flyers — Ivan Provorov – refused to participate in the Flyers Pride night.

Read
Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

To anyone who follows sports with any degree of interest, it should come as no surprise that the NHL does not exactly take the lead or considered to be visionary when it comes to cultural issues.

The NHL is beyond woeful in its treatment of concussions and head injuries in hockey. The science is settled. It’s not conjecture. It’s not speculation. It’s not wishful thinking. Repeated blows to the head can cause chronic traumatic encephalopathy, commonly referred to CTE. Yet the NHL consistently downplays this issue that is very much a matter of life and death, and says the science on head injuries isn’t clear.

It’s complete bunk, and everyone knows it.

Now comes the NHL’s completely tone-deaf response to a controversy that occurred last week when a player from the Philadelphia Flyers — Ivan Provorov – refused to participate in the Flyers Pride night.

COLUMN: On Parliament Hill – Opening the floodgates

Ted Falk, MP for Provencher 4 minute read Preview

COLUMN: On Parliament Hill – Opening the floodgates

Ted Falk, MP for Provencher 4 minute read Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

The Liberal government is considering a radical new approach to immigration, one that poses grave risks to Canada and immigrants alike.

A leaked document shows Immigration, Citizenship and Refugees Canada (IRCC) is considering waiving eligibility rules for hundreds of thousands of applications, and other new bulk processing measures.

Doing so means the department would no longer discern if an individual had the necessary funds for their stay in Canada or monitor if those whose visas had expired had, indeed, left the country.

To make matters worse, the memo outlined the government’s desire to keep these new measures a secret, saying they should not be communicated to the public.

Read
Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

The Liberal government is considering a radical new approach to immigration, one that poses grave risks to Canada and immigrants alike.

A leaked document shows Immigration, Citizenship and Refugees Canada (IRCC) is considering waiving eligibility rules for hundreds of thousands of applications, and other new bulk processing measures.

Doing so means the department would no longer discern if an individual had the necessary funds for their stay in Canada or monitor if those whose visas had expired had, indeed, left the country.

To make matters worse, the memo outlined the government’s desire to keep these new measures a secret, saying they should not be communicated to the public.

Tache Community Centre funding announced

Greg Vandermeulen 4 minute read Preview

Tache Community Centre funding announced

Greg Vandermeulen 4 minute read Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

Monday was a day of celebration and a long time coming for Lorette residents who will get a new community centre.

Planned to be built on the southeast side of the current arena, the $11 million facility will include 62,000 sq. ft. for the arena and spectator area and 8,000 square feet for the Tache Library.

Funding for the facility will include $4.4 million from the federal government’s Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program (ICIP), $3.67 million from the provincial government and $2.9 million from the RM of Tache.

Dignitaries gathered at centre ice in Lorette’s arena to make the announcement, taking the time to drop a ceremonial puck in celebration.

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Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

GREG VANDERMEULEN THE CARILLON

Premier Heather Stefanson takes part in a ceremonial puck drop for St Adolphe hockey player Dakota Lagasse and Lorette hockey player Tristin Thomas as RM of Tache Mayor Armand Poirier and Dawson Trail MLA Bob Lagasse look on.

Steinbach pharmacist recognized for can-do attitude

Nicole Buffie 3 minute read Preview

Steinbach pharmacist recognized for can-do attitude

Nicole Buffie 3 minute read Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

A local pharmacist and sole Manitoba recipient of a national pharmacy award is crediting his colleagues and clients for the recognition.

Dale Warkentin, pharmacy manager at Sobeys Pharmacy in Steinbach, received an APOthecary Heros Award, being nominated by a former clinical student who practiced at the location two years ago.

“I was very much surprised,” he said from the pharmacy Tuesday afternoon.

The APOthecary Heros Awards, an annual program ran by Canadian-based pharmaceutical company Apotex, honors eight pharmacy professionals who “play a critical role in improving patient health and going above and beyond in their day-to-day for the well-being of Canadians.”

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Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

NICOLE BUFFIE THE CARILLON

Dale Warkentin, pharmacy manager at Sobeys Pharmacy, was one of eight pharmacists across Canada to receive an APOthecary Heros Award.

COLUMN: Ask the Money Lady – Add structured notes to your portfolio

Christine Ibbotson 4 minute read Preview

COLUMN: Ask the Money Lady – Add structured notes to your portfolio

Christine Ibbotson 4 minute read Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

Dear Money Lady Readers,

Many of you have sent me emails with genuine worry about your retirement portfolios as we ride the waves of high inflation, lending rates, and low stock market returns. I want to introduce you to an alternative to securities, mutual funds or exchange traded funds (ETFs). Why not consider diversifying your portfolio in part with structured notes?

There is something for everyone in the Structured Notes (SN) arena because they vary by complexity and risk. They are certainly not for everyone; however, are still a good investment product to consider adding to your portfolio for further diversification. The reason I like these products is because they are easily available at your retail bank and can give you a much better return than simple GICs. For the most part, the basic SNs have a guaranteed payout amount on a guaranteed redemption date, making the return something you can count on in the future. They are also a much better option than preferred shares. So, what exactly are they?

SN’s are unsecured debt obligations originating from financial institutions. Most are issued by Canadian Schedule 1 chartered banks, (example: RBC, TD, BMO, BNS, NB, CIBC) but they are nothing like a GIC and they are not covered by the CDIC insurance. SN’s can be thought of as an alternative to other investment products like exchange traded funds (ETF) or mutual funds (MF), however the benefit is that they will have a stated maturity date when they are to be cashed out. Most come with a fixed payout date upon maturity (like a bond), but you can also acquire SNs that pay a fixed or variable payment over the life of the product (like a 30 year preferred share). SN’s have distinct tax advantages since you can make future withdrawals from the product as a return of capital (ROC) payment which defers the tax until maturity or disposition of the note.

Read
Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

Dear Money Lady Readers,

Many of you have sent me emails with genuine worry about your retirement portfolios as we ride the waves of high inflation, lending rates, and low stock market returns. I want to introduce you to an alternative to securities, mutual funds or exchange traded funds (ETFs). Why not consider diversifying your portfolio in part with structured notes?

There is something for everyone in the Structured Notes (SN) arena because they vary by complexity and risk. They are certainly not for everyone; however, are still a good investment product to consider adding to your portfolio for further diversification. The reason I like these products is because they are easily available at your retail bank and can give you a much better return than simple GICs. For the most part, the basic SNs have a guaranteed payout amount on a guaranteed redemption date, making the return something you can count on in the future. They are also a much better option than preferred shares. So, what exactly are they?

SN’s are unsecured debt obligations originating from financial institutions. Most are issued by Canadian Schedule 1 chartered banks, (example: RBC, TD, BMO, BNS, NB, CIBC) but they are nothing like a GIC and they are not covered by the CDIC insurance. SN’s can be thought of as an alternative to other investment products like exchange traded funds (ETF) or mutual funds (MF), however the benefit is that they will have a stated maturity date when they are to be cashed out. Most come with a fixed payout date upon maturity (like a bond), but you can also acquire SNs that pay a fixed or variable payment over the life of the product (like a 30 year preferred share). SN’s have distinct tax advantages since you can make future withdrawals from the product as a return of capital (ROC) payment which defers the tax until maturity or disposition of the note.

FLASHBACK 1958: Blumenhof Black Hawks are first HTHL champs

Wes Keating 4 minute read Preview

FLASHBACK 1958: Blumenhof Black Hawks are first HTHL champs

Wes Keating 4 minute read Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

The Blumenhof Black Hawks came back from a one-game deficit to win two straight games, becoming the first champions of the brand new Hanover-Tache League, organized just three months earlier.

The team was awarded the L.A. Barkman Trophy Friday night, after defeating Shakespeare, 7-3 in the deciding game of the best-of-three series.

With the score tied 3-3 at the 14-minute mark of the third period of the final game, Blumenhof star John Penner led an offensive attack that earned him a hat trick in 2:30 minutes and gave his team the win. John Kornelsen added an extra goal to make the final score 7-3.

Scoring came in bunches in the game, as three first-period goals were also scored within two minutes. Albert Rempel scored the first one for Shakespeare from a scramble in front of the net, and Ruben Plett retaliated with a pair for Blumenhof.Victor Friesen gave Blumenhof a 3-1 lead in the second frame, but an answering Shakespeare goal by Harry Kehler, and another in the third by Ed Kehler tied it up.

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Sunday, Jan. 29, 2023

Winners of the first Hanover-Tache League championship and the L.A. Barkman Trophy, Blumenhof team defeated Shakespeare in a best-of-three final. Front row; left to right: Eric Toews, Ernie Penner, Eddie Penner, Victor Friesen and John Kornelsen. Back row: Coach Ben Klassen, Johnny Wohlgemuth, Leo Thiessen, Jake Wiebe, John Penner, Ruben Plett and Bill Penner. Missing is Johnny Penner.

Fast takes helm of Loewen Windows

Jordan Ross 6 minute read Preview

Fast takes helm of Loewen Windows

Jordan Ross 6 minute read Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023

The new president and CEO of Loewen Windows says the post-pandemic economy presents plenty of opportunity for the 118-year-old window and door manufacturer.

“When there are disruptions or changes in the market, whether that comes from the pandemic or changes in interest rates, there’s always lots of opportunity there for an organization that’s ready to step up and make itself known to its customers and provide great product,” Neil Fast said Monday in an interview.

Fast’s first day on the job was Jan. 16.

“The calibre of people and the work environment that I’m stepping into, I couldn’t be happier. It’s just a very strong team,” he said.

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Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023

JORDAN ROSS THE CARILLON

Neil Fast, the new president and CEO of Loewen Windows, says knowledgeable people are a company’s greatest asset during times of uncertainty.

COLUMN: Don’t Mind the Mess – Just as I am

Lori Penner 3 minute read Preview

COLUMN: Don’t Mind the Mess – Just as I am

Lori Penner 3 minute read Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023

There were only three things that could get my dad off the tractor on a summer day: the sabbath, rain, or a Billy Graham crusade.

These crusades, or giant revival meetings, were hosted by this distinguished-looking Southern Baptist preacher with a North Carolina accent for 58 years.

They were held in auditoriums, stadiums, parks, or streets in over 185 countries, and watched on television sets around the globe.

Billy Graham was an old school minister who preached the gospel like it was the plain truth and invited people to come forward to pray and ask Jesus to be their saviour. Each crusade would conclude with the altar call song, “Just As I Am” and literally tens of thousands of people would slowly file to the front, as he patiently waited on stage, head bowed in silent prayer.

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Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023

There were only three things that could get my dad off the tractor on a summer day: the sabbath, rain, or a Billy Graham crusade.

These crusades, or giant revival meetings, were hosted by this distinguished-looking Southern Baptist preacher with a North Carolina accent for 58 years.

They were held in auditoriums, stadiums, parks, or streets in over 185 countries, and watched on television sets around the globe.

Billy Graham was an old school minister who preached the gospel like it was the plain truth and invited people to come forward to pray and ask Jesus to be their saviour. Each crusade would conclude with the altar call song, “Just As I Am” and literally tens of thousands of people would slowly file to the front, as he patiently waited on stage, head bowed in silent prayer.

Jail time for repeat impaired driver

Jordan Ross 2 minute read Preview

Jail time for repeat impaired driver

Jordan Ross 2 minute read Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023

A 32-year-old man recorded his second conviction for impaired driving in under five years, triggering a mandatory jail sentence.

Patrick Jason Smith was sentenced in Steinbach provincial court last Thursday to 30 days of time served plus a two-year driving ban.

Smith was previously convicted of impaired driving-related offences in Saskatchewan in 2019 and in Manitoba in 2010.

His latest charge, to which he pleaded guilty, was laid following a Feb. 10, 2022 incident.

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Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023

A 32-year-old man recorded his second conviction for impaired driving in under five years, triggering a mandatory jail sentence.

Patrick Jason Smith was sentenced in Steinbach provincial court last Thursday to 30 days of time served plus a two-year driving ban.

Smith was previously convicted of impaired driving-related offences in Saskatchewan in 2019 and in Manitoba in 2010.

His latest charge, to which he pleaded guilty, was laid following a Feb. 10, 2022 incident.

Anvil stolen from La Broquerie

Greg Vandermeulen 1 minute read Preview

Anvil stolen from La Broquerie

Greg Vandermeulen 1 minute read Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023

RCMP are on the lookout for a stolen horseshoe anvil taken from a residence on the 200 block of Gauthier Street in La Broquerie.

Police say the anvil was stolen sometime during the evening of Jan. 12 and before 3:30 a.m. on Jan. 13.

It’s described as roughly 12 inches tall, made of solid steel and weighing in at 100 pounds. The anvil’s value is pegged at $1,600.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Steinbach RCMP at 204-326-4452 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or www.manitobacrimestoppers.com.

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Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023

RCMP are on the lookout for a stolen horseshoe anvil taken from a residence on the 200 block of Gauthier Street in La Broquerie.

Police say the anvil was stolen sometime during the evening of Jan. 12 and before 3:30 a.m. on Jan. 13.

It’s described as roughly 12 inches tall, made of solid steel and weighing in at 100 pounds. The anvil’s value is pegged at $1,600.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Steinbach RCMP at 204-326-4452 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or www.manitobacrimestoppers.com.

Former Steinbach Piston Cole Smith bags first NHL goal

Cassidy Dankochik 2 minute read Preview

Former Steinbach Piston Cole Smith bags first NHL goal

Cassidy Dankochik 2 minute read Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023

A former Steinbach Pistons player has found the back of the net in the world’s best hockey league.

Cole Smith, the 1995-born forward from Brainerd, Minn., notched his first NHL goal Jan. 21 against the Los Angeles Kings. Smith plays for the Nashville Predators, and has been a mainstay in the lineup this season, appearing in 40 games. Dailyfaceoff.com lists Smith as playing on the Predators third line alongside Colton Sissons and Jusso Parssinen.

“It’s super exciting,” Smith told reporters in front of his locker after the game.

“It’s a little past overdue I think… hopefully the floodgates can open up a little bit.”

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Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023

A former Steinbach Pistons player has found the back of the net in the world’s best hockey league.

Cole Smith, the 1995-born forward from Brainerd, Minn., notched his first NHL goal Jan. 21 against the Los Angeles Kings. Smith plays for the Nashville Predators, and has been a mainstay in the lineup this season, appearing in 40 games. Dailyfaceoff.com lists Smith as playing on the Predators third line alongside Colton Sissons and Jusso Parssinen.

“It’s super exciting,” Smith told reporters in front of his locker after the game.

“It’s a little past overdue I think… hopefully the floodgates can open up a little bit.”

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