Adriano Magnifico

Adriano Magnifico

St. Boniface community correspondent

Adriano Magnifico is a community correspondent for St. Boniface. You can contact him at anomag60@gmail.com

Recent articles of Adriano Magnifico

Career pathing benefits from mentors

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Preview

Career pathing benefits from mentors

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Yesterday at 9:33 AM CST

Andre Bazin, a 2016 Nelson McIntyre Collegiate grad, spoke at the annual Junior Achievement Manitoba Business Hall of Fame Dinner on Nov. 3 at the MET Entertainment Centre on Donald Street.

He dazzled a packed house filled with Winnipeg’s business leaders, including Manitoba Business Hall of Fame inductees on this night, Hartley Richardson, President of James Richardson & Sons, Limited, and Doug Harvey, CEO and Founder of DLH Group.

Back in high school, Andre would never have dreamed of telling his unfolding personal and business narrative on such a night. He was an average student with a C-B academic average who enjoyed playing on sports teams and socializing with friends. Career-wise, he was lost.

He credits a decision he made in high school to join the Junior Achievement (JA) program with helping him find focus to realize his goals.

Yesterday at 9:33 AM CST

Andre Bazin, a 2016 Nelson McIntyre Collegiate grad, spoke at the annual Junior Achievement Manitoba Business Hall of Fame Dinner on Nov. 3.

Students grapple with supply chain issues

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Preview

Students grapple with supply chain issues

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2022

“Hey, bro, I need 40 cases and you didn’t give me anything.”

“Why are you ordering so much stuff?”

“In a couple of months, I should be fine. But I’ve got a lot of inventory to move.”

“You need to be more consistent in your ordering. I’ve got a huge backlog.”

Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2022

Adriano Magnifico

Jeremie Kuypers, teacher in the applied business management program at the Arts and Technology Centre in LRSD, facilitates the Cola Wars supply chain challenge with his Grade 12 class.

Hamlet and the melancholy student

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Hamlet and the melancholy student

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Sep. 7, 2022

When Mrs. Axworthy introduced me to Shakespeare’s Hamlet back in the day, I was immediately absorbed in the melancholy Dane’s struggle, as he grapples with human and supernatural traumas beyond his control.

I’ve had the good fortune of teaching the play a few dozen times and I’m always impressed with how youth connect to the Prince of Denmark’s moral complexities.

Hamlet is at various times thoughtful, creative, dramatic, intelligent, strategic, indecisive, athletic, depressed, introspective and downright confounding.

He feels betrayed, acts impulsively, seeks justice, trusts almost no one, fights with his mother, breaks up with his girlfriend, depends on BFF Horatio for support, and generally has trouble getting his act together.

Wednesday, Sep. 7, 2022

High school students often feel like the beleaguered Prince of Denmark in Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

The new extracurricular activity: esports

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The new extracurricular activity: esports

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 27, 2022

Large computer monitors are arranged in a Canada -goose-like V-shape, with the apex pointed toward a large screen on the stage.

Each side of the V features five video-game players in plush chairs, focused and engaged, hands scurrying about their keyboards in epic battles to control landscapes.

This is the latest addition to local high school sports.

J.H. Bruns faced off against Steinbach Regional Secondary School in a best-of-five, B-side final of the Manitoba League of Legends (LoL) esport championships back on April 29 in the Louis Riel Arts and Tech Centre gymnasium.

Wednesday, Jul. 27, 2022

The J. H. Bruns League of Legends team engaged in a hot battle with Steinbach (on the other side of the V) in the Louis Riel ATC gym on April 29.

Nelson Mac Schulich winner is multi-talented

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Nelson Mac Schulich winner is multi-talented

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 15, 2022

Grade 12 Nelson McIntyre student Marina Caracas Le-Fort, a 2022 winner of the prestigious national Schulich Leader scholarship, is no stranger to obstacles.

When her family completely uprooted their lives in Brazil to build a new life in Winnipeg in 2016, “It was really challenging being thrown into a whole new country without any support systems beyond my family and with poor English skills.”

Hard work, family support, teacher mentorship, and an insatiable curiosity for learning has helped her overcome those early struggles.

Schulich took notice, awarding a $100,000 scholarship to finance her entire undergraduate program for the next five years in computer engineering at the University of Manitoba.

Wednesday, Jun. 15, 2022

Marina Caracas Le-Fort is a 2022 winner of the Schulich leadership award, a $100,000 prize which will fund her computer engineering studies at the University of Manitoba.

Reflecting on career paths should be a priority

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Reflecting on career paths should be a priority

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, May. 4, 2022

Considering its ubiquitous and highly relevant nature to every student in every K-12 school system, thinking about ‘careers’ surely gets serious attention in schools, right?

Not really.

Students are often left on their own to work out a career plan after high school. Schools prioritize completing the required 30 credits; there often isn’t time to help students figure out what to do with them.

And that’s a problem according to Grade 11 Glenlawn student C.J. Campbell, who felt that courses lacked discussion about how they connect to future skills and jobs.

Wednesday, May. 4, 2022

C.J. Campbell, a Grade 11 student at Glenlawn Collegiate, is currently in the broadcast media program in the Louis Riel Arts and Technology Centre.

Junior Achievement hints at future careers

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Junior Achievement hints at future careers

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Mar. 23, 2022

High school is a busy and pivotal time in anyone’s life.

Students toil through 30 credits in a variety of disciplines that hopefully point them towards career paths.

Many also choose extracurricular activities that often make all the difference in answering the quintessential high school query: “What should I do after high school?”

Such an activity is Junior Achievement’s (JA) Company Program, operating at Windsor Park Collegiate and Nelson McIntyre Collegiate with support from teachers and community volunteers.

Wednesday, Mar. 23, 2022

Justin Patrocinio (left) of Windsor Park Collegiate and Rachel McEwan of Nelson McIntyre Collegiate are presidents of Revive Manitoba and Sprout, respectively. They lead teams of students from both schools who are taking part in the Junior Achievement Company Program.

Students embrace virtual career fair

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Students embrace virtual career fair

Adriano Magnifico 6 minute read Friday, Feb. 4, 2022

When the pandemic shut down Winnipeg’s annual Rotary Career Symposium at the RBC Convention Centre in 2020, a serious vacuum was created in the career development sphere.For 22 years, the symposium gathered hundreds of diverse career players in the same place at the same time, offering a unique venue for students to think about and plan for future pathways and careers. The void prompted Manitoba Career Prospects to move into the symposium domain for a second consecutive year, organizing and hosting the Manitoba Virtual Career Fair on Jan. 19. Over 1,700 high school students from throughout the province navigated 50 diverse ‘booths’ through the digital conduits of MS Teams, Zoom, Google Meets, Facebook, Airmeet, and Cisco WebEx. The 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. program offered live and taped half-hour presentations from universities and colleges, sector councils, businesses and non-profit organizations. Manitoba Career Prospects coordinator Jackelyn Tsouras believes that students “need to be aware of all the various careers and education in Manitoba… it’s more important than ever to give our youth hope for the future.”  The day was an eye-opener for many high school students, most of whom see great value in career planning opportunities.Ridhwanlai Badmos, a Grade 11 student at Windsor Park Collegiate, explored university science programs. “Many students my age don’t know what career path to pursue or have vague ideas without plans on how to follow through,” he said. Chahat Sharma, also in Grade 11 at WPC, attended an RBC Future Launch talk on social media practices to complement her post-secondary options. “At my age, learning about the many post-secondary programs offered in Manitoba and how to qualify for them is very important,” she said.Keira Media, a Grade 12 student from WPC joined a session by Manitoba Music that “pushed me to think twice about my first-action steps” to support her post-secondary plan.Ruth Beitler of the applied business program at the Louis Riel Arts and Technology Centre was ‘pleasantly surprised to find out that attaining a degree in fashion design is actually not as impossible as I thought.”Pondering the medical field, Grade 12 student Dana Santander from Collège Beliveau checked out Volunteer Manitoba to seek community experiences, noting that “many of us struggle with finding what career path would work best.”Grade 12 student Mackenzie Barkman from CB, who is interested in web design, had a ‘eureka’ moment. “I’m now planning on going to Robertson College after attending its live session,” she said.Will future career fairs go virtual? “Not necessarily,” Tsouras said. “We are still gathering feedback but may continue to offer this event virtually after the pandemic.”Many recorded livestream sessions at the symposium are still available for students and parents to view at www.manitobacareerprospects.ca/manitoba-career-fair-videos.aspAdriano Magnifico is a community correspondent for St. Boniface. You can contact him at anomag60@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter: @AnoMagnifico

When the pandemic shut down Winnipeg’s annual Rotary Career Symposium at the RBC Convention Centre in 2020, a serious vacuum was created in the career development sphere.

For 22 years, the symposium gathered hundreds of diverse career players in the same place at the same time, offering a unique venue for students to think about and plan for future pathways and careers. 

The void prompted Manitoba Career Prospects to move into the symposium domain for a second consecutive year, organizing and hosting the Manitoba Virtual Career Fair on Jan. 19. 

Friday, Feb. 4, 2022

Supplied photo
(From left) Windsor Park Collegiate students Chat Sharma, Keira Medina and Ridhwanlai Badmos attended the recent Manitoba Virtual Career Fair.

ATC broadcast media program builds skills

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Preview

ATC broadcast media program builds skills

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2021

“Can we set up in the press box instead of the truck?”

“Who will be doing the hand-held on the field?”

“Are the snakes organized and wound properly?”

“Who’s the director? The producer? The scorebug? The switcher?”

Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2021

Supplied photo by Christopher Curry
Kyle Bergantim works a football game at East Side Eagles Field. He is enrolled in the broadcast media program at the Louis Riel Arts and Technology Centre.

Helping kids navigate their futures

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Preview

Helping kids navigate their futures

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2021

“I’m worried about losing my friends.”

“I don’t want to disappoint my family.”

“What if I wind up hating my post-secondary school?”

“I hope I don’t choose the wrong career path.”

Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2021

Supplied photo
Veronica Ford is a Grade 11 student at Nelson McIntyre Collegiate who recently used the LEAN Career Design Canvas to help define her future goals.

Hallways of Indigenous inspiration at ATC

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Hallways of Indigenous inspiration at ATC

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021

Walking through the off-white cinder blocks and drywalled hallways of a high school is not generally an engaging exercise.

Unless you happen to be in the Louis Riel Arts and Technology Centre.

And it’s all because of 2015 ATC hairstyling graduate Justine Proulx.

This fall, she has reshaped the look and feel of the school with a stunning, hallway-long mural and a variety of artworks in virtually every corner of the school.   

Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
Justine Proulx, pictured with some of the artwork she has created in the hallways of the Louis Riel School Division Arts and Technology Centre.

Norwood Honey brings extra buzz to the area

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Preview

Norwood Honey brings extra buzz to the area

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Sep. 22, 2021

Carol Wenaus has been stung a few times.

She doesn’t mind. It’s part of the gig. She’s a beekeeper in Norwood.

In early September, Wenaus set up shop in her front yard, selling 880 pounds of this year’s Norwood Honey crop.

While beekeeping sounds like hazardous work, Carol sees it differently.   

Wednesday, Sep. 22, 2021

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
Carol Wenaus and and son Niklas Konowal stand over one of their hives with Norwood Honey jars.

Raising monarch butterflies the Manitoba way

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Raising monarch butterflies the Manitoba way

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Sunday, Aug. 22, 2021

It begins with a light cracking sound.

A tiny body squirms and twists. A small fissure winds its way around a translucent shell. Gently, the body slides through the crack. It sits quietly, unsure of its new world.

A white-speckled, black-and orange-winged male monarch butterfly is born.

His name is Patrick. He joins Moira, Johnny, David and Alexis, born earlier in the week.

Sunday, Aug. 22, 2021

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
Patrick, a male monarch butterfly, spreads his wing on a milkweed plant in Vicki Magnifico’s yard.

Sewing the seeds of entrepreneurship

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Sewing the seeds of entrepreneurship

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Friday, Jul. 23, 2021

A small cluster of students sits at a corner table, solving problems regarding hem lines, collar styles and fastener options.

Some pull fabric through whirring sewing machines and sergers.

At large tables in the centre of the room, others cut patterns from cotton, polyester, or denim for projects that range from a quilt to a Fortnite stuffie.  

Julie Koch’s textile arts and design fabrication lab at is a popular class at Nelson McIntyre Collegiate.

Friday, Jul. 23, 2021

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
Emily Potter shows off a succulent plant in a terracotta pot that she and other Nelson McIntyre Colllegiate sold through NMC Crafts + Plants Virtual Market.

Even tigers need to adapt to COVID-19

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Preview

Even tigers need to adapt to COVID-19

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Monday, May. 31, 2021

If you were expecting to read about Bengal tigers changing their lifestyles because of COVID-19, unfortunately, you’ve been misled.

These Tigers are human. They’re entrepreneurs.

For the past 12 years, they have been playing the role of Tiger-judges in Louis Riel School Division’s Tigers’ Den entrepreneurship conference.

A year ago, 100 students and 12 teachers gathered in the division’s Legacy Centre and immersed themselves in a day of business-plan ideas and problem-solving, culminating in a series of frenzied afternoon pitches to 30 business professionals.

Monday, May. 31, 2021

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
Kenwren Apilado, a Grade 12 student in the career internship program at Windsor Park Collegiate, submitted the winning entry, an app called AllergyFree, to the Louis Riel School Division’s Tiger’s Den entrepreneurship conference.

Gen Z asking the right questions about money

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Preview

Gen Z asking the right questions about money

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Thursday, Apr. 29, 2021

What is an example of a good debt?

Does paying your credit card early help your credit score?

When is the best time to buy a GIC, a bond, or a mutual fund?

What are some good companies or things to invest in right now?

Thursday, Apr. 29, 2021

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
Ethan Waltham, a Grade 11 student in the ABM program at Louis Riel Arts an dTechnology Centre, said he learned a lot from an RBC Future Launch workshop.

Red River Trail a refuge from the pandemic

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Red River Trail a refuge from the pandemic

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Mar. 31, 2021

2020-21 became the winter of our discontent, as a pandemic forced us all to hibernate in our homes, stare at screens and avoid most human contact.

I was becoming the fly in the Cronenberg movie - eye strain, neck aches, poor posture, and a sedentary lifestyle reshaping my body.

I looked forward to grocery shopping, just to get out. To be honest, though, going for any car ride got my tail wagging.

Encountering a shaggy-haired neighbour outside my bubble while walking the dogs this winter was a bonus (although I seemed to have developed safe-distancing angst).

Wednesday, Mar. 31, 2021

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
Vicki Magnifico at the end of the Winnipeg Foundation Centennial River Trail with dogs Maggie (black) and Mighty (grey/white/black).

Hackers welcome in info systems program

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Hackers welcome in info systems program

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Mar. 10, 2021

Being ‘hacked’ is becoming an all-too-common downside of living online.

The sheer number of victims is staggering. the 2014 hack of eBay involved 145 million users, Equifax’s 2017 attack 148 million, Marriot Hotels’ 2014-2018 assault 500 million.

In December 2020, hackers breached software tech company SolarWinds, gaining access to data in many U.S. government networks and private tech companies, including Microsoft.

Customer names, IDs, user names, passwords, debit and credit card information, social security numbers, birthdays, addresses, drivers’ license numbers - if it’s online, your stuff can be hacked.

Wednesday, Mar. 10, 2021

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
Frank Catojo, teacher of the information systems program at the Arts and Technical Centre is pictured with former student Noah Reeder, who is now studying at Royal Military College in Kingston, Ont.

Pandemic drives culinary program to improvise

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Pandemic drives culinary program to improvise

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021

Improvisation is a word often associated with drama classes, a creative state of continually inventing and iterating.  

The term aptly describes our state of COVID-19. We eat, walk, jog, gather, play, shop, work, and teach in ways we couldn’t fathom a year ago. Nothing is as it was. Rules continue to evolve.

No educational institution has had to improvise its programming more than the Louis Riel Arts and Technology Centre (ATC), a school that annually attracts over 200 students in 13 industry-driven programs who choose applied, ‘hands-on’ and technical training along with community internships.

‘Hands-on’ is especially challenging with social distancing and incessant handwashing.

Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
(From left) Eden Solvason, Mason Kamal, Kim Hibbert, Ben Anderson and Sajanpreet Dhaliwal are students in the culinary arts program at the Louis Riel Arts and Technology Centre.

Hockey Night in Norwood — pandemic style

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Preview

Hockey Night in Norwood — pandemic style

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021

COVID-19 has stopped much of life in its tracks.

Each season this year has been burdened with this albatross of a virus, curtailing normal activities Winnipeggers take for granted.

Retail stores and restaurants practice curbside pick-up to minimize human interaction, Christmas and New Year’s gatherings were supplanted by video conferences, schools continue to move more kids to virtual classrooms.

Canada’s national pastime became another piece of collateral damage inflicted by the pandemic with hockey teams and games outlawed to satisfy the code red Public Health mandate. Community centres were forced to close down their indoor and outdoor rinks.

Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
Lucas and Eva Kozielec have been enjoying their outdoor rink in Norwood Flats.

Students go virtual to plan post-secondary options

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Students go virtual to plan post-secondary options

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2020

For all high school students, exploring career options is an integral part of the high school experience.

At this time of year, representatives from the universities and colleges in Manitoba visit libraries and gymnasiums to promote their programs and answer questions.

Some of the smaller institutions set up booths in the hallways and connect with students on spares or during lunch hours.

Students and parents plan to visit career symposiums and job fairs to speak directly with industry and educational professionals.

Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2020

Supplied photo
Grade 11 Windsor Park Collegiate student Justin Patrocinio says he welcomes the opportunity to learn about post-secondary education opportunities from the comfort of home.

Ready for an adventure in Careerland?

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Preview

Ready for an adventure in Careerland?

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020

COVID-19 has changed the way we leave the house, shop, socialize, gather, walk the dog, eat, wash our hands, and otherwise lead our lives.

Virtually nothing has gone untouched by this relentless pandemic.

When we think we have the virus under control, it surges, reminding us to be ever vigilant.Schools have been at the forefront in this unprecedented environment, delivering programming with stringent social distancing and masking protocols, often with half-empty classrooms and scattered virtual classrooms.

The Louis Riel Arts and Technology Centre (ATC) bears the extra burden of delivering 13 applied learning and technical programs that specialize in ‘hands-on’ learning.

Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
Isabella Soares and Lili Chen, pictured recording another episode of their Adventures in Careerland podcast.

Train your brain at Norwood Retirement Boot Camp

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Train your brain at Norwood Retirement Boot Camp

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020

Why do I feel so bored? What should the next chapter in my life look like? What opportunities are out there for me? How has COVID-19 changed my plans? What have I done?

These questions are top of mind for people who have taken the retirement plunge or are thinking about what to do after a lifetime of work.

Jay Downs, certified retirement coach and creator of the Norwood Retirement Boot Camp, believes that “people today have different definitions about what happens after retirement.”

His clients are mostly Baby Boomers, a demographic cohort born between 1946 and 1964 that was once the largest in history, supplanted only by millennials’ sheer numbers.

Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020

Supplied photo
Jay Downs offers retirees a way to “add life to their years” at the Norwood Retirement Boot Camp program at Norwood Community Centre.

Twin basswoods of Balsam Place are no more

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Twin basswoods of Balsam Place are no more

Adriano Magnifico 3 minute read Monday, Sep. 14, 2020

On Aug. 11, the community of Norwood lost two of its iconic landmarks.

The twin basswood trees of Balsam Place, located on the northwest periphery of Nordale School, succumbed to disease and old age.

The 25-metre, spade-shaped sentinels were the gateway to Balsam Place and a source of admiration and play for many generations of Norwood residents.

They had weathered some difficult times in the last few years. In 2015, a large limb collapsed; in 2019, during the fall ice storm, a large, trunk-sized branch fell onto an adjoining house.

Monday, Sep. 14, 2020

Photo by Adriano Magnifico
Old age and disease sounded the death knell for two iconic basswood trees in Norwood, which were removed by the City of Winnipeg on Aug. 11.