Heather Innis

Heather Innis

Windsor Park community correspondent

 Heather Innis is a community correspondent for Windsor Park. You can contact her at htiede@gmail.com

Recent articles of Heather Innis

The cat came back (but took its own sweet time)

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The cat came back (but took its own sweet time)

Heather Innis 3 minute read Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2022

Sometimes life hands you little miracles in ways you’d never expect.

This past summer, my family and I were devasted when our two-year old orange tabby (appropriately named Pumpkin by my daughter) went missing while visiting my folks in a small village near Whiteshell Provincial Park. Although he was familiar with my parents’ house, he’s an indoor cat who always feared their wide-open back yard. This made it particularly shocking to us when we discovered one morning he had snuck out the back door sometime the previous evening.

After a couple of days searching fields, driving up and down nearby roads, knocking on doors and handing out flyers, we had to accept the fact that Pumpkin was gone and went home to Winnipeg.

As the days and weeks went by, we continued to hope and pray for his safe return, but the outlook was bleak. Being an indoor cat and unfamiliar with the region didn’t bode well for a happy outcome.

Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2022

Pumpkin, the two-year-old orange tabby belonging to correspondent Heather Innis and her family, took an unscheduled summer vacation in the Whiteshell this summer.

Adults just wanna have fun…

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Adults just wanna have fun…

Heather Innis 2 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 6, 2022

I love having lots of hobbies – in fact, I often joke with my husband that we need a larger house just to store all of my supplies.

Sometimes when I’m feeling a bit down, engaging in one of my favourite pastimes really helps improve my mood. Other times, especially if I’m feeling particularly low, I can’t work up the energy or enthusiasm to even think about working on a new or existing project.

It wasn’t until recently that I think I figured out why, as a middle-aged adult, sometimes spending time with a hobby just isn’t enough.

Why?

Wednesday, Jul. 6, 2022

Every adult needs to be reminded to have fun with their hobbies and pastimes.

Take a few moments to reflect on 2021

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Take a few moments to reflect on 2021

Heather Innis 3 minute read Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022

As challenging as 2021 has been for many of us, as I reflect on lastast year I have realized I actually have a lot to be thankful for and that I am proud of myself for making a few small (but definitely significant) changes that have helped me through these difficult times.

I would like to share a few of these here with you, not to be boastful but rather to encourage each of us to look back on the year and identify at least one or two successes, whether they were major goals, an outstanding task finally accomplished, or simply adding a new and healthy habit into your everyday life.

Here are few of mine:

• Developing a regular practice of gratitude and meditation — This was one of my first attempts at self-improvement this year and it quickly became an integral part of my daily routine. At minimum, I always try to meditate first thing in the morning when I wake up and then again just before I go to sleep. I also created a personal gratitude journal so I could write down everything I was thankful for, no matter how seemingly small or inconsequential. Making these activities a daily habit has significantly improved my overall mood and ability to handle day-to-day stressors.

Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022

As challenging as 2021 has been for many of us, as I reflect on lastast year I have realized I actually have a lot to be thankful for and that I am proud of myself for making a few small (but definitely significant) changes that have helped me through these difficult times.

I would like to share a few of these here with you, not to be boastful but rather to encourage each of us to look back on the year and identify at least one or two successes, whether they were major goals, an outstanding task finally accomplished, or simply adding a new and healthy habit into your everyday life.

Here are few of mine:

• Developing a regular practice of gratitude and meditation — This was one of my first attempts at self-improvement this year and it quickly became an integral part of my daily routine. At minimum, I always try to meditate first thing in the morning when I wake up and then again just before I go to sleep. I also created a personal gratitude journal so I could write down everything I was thankful for, no matter how seemingly small or inconsequential. Making these activities a daily habit has significantly improved my overall mood and ability to handle day-to-day stressors.

The importance of self-care

Heather Innis 3 minute read Preview

The importance of self-care

Heather Innis 3 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2021

One of the things I’ve learned in the past 18 months of pandemic life is the importance of taking time for yourself. Of course, everyone wants to make sure their family and friends are as happy and healthy as possible.

But I’ve come to realize there is a good reason why when you travel on an airplane the instructions are to put on your own oxygen mask first before assisting others — if you are not taking care of yourself, then you won’t be in a position to take care of others.

Self care is important not only for your own mental health but it has the added benefit of keeping you strong and healthy for others who depend on you.

One of the ways in which I like to practise self care is through meditation. There are some really good YouTube channels on which you can find a meditation that suits your mood — whether it’s for relaxation, reducing anxiety, increasing creativity, or simply to help you fall asleep.

Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2021

Dreamstime.com
Practising meditation is one of many ways you can take a few moments for yourself each day.

In search of toys of yesteryear

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In search of toys of yesteryear

Heather Innis 3 minute read Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021

I used to think it was silly that people spent ridiculous amounts of money to buy back their beloved childhood toys.

That is, until I realized my own treasured childhood horde of dolls and games was long gone… lost to countless donation drives and thrift stores over the years, not to mention the elements of a rickety old shed. I’m fairly certain my favourite walking doll (a gift from Santa when I was five) and my Cabbage Patch Doll named Kathleen (a birthday gift from my parents) are somewhere at the bottom of a water-damaged box sharing a home with spiders, mice, and other creepy crawlies in the shed.

I remember when I first realized my childhood toys were considered vintage. A museum I was visiting had a trunk of “old” toys, including many of the Fisher Price gems I grew up with like the school desk, farm set and record player. I recall staring at the toybox and thinking that I barely 30 years old! How could these be in a museum already?

Of course, while the toys I grew up with in the ’70s and ’80s are now definitely vintage, I’m surprised at how much I really wish I still had them with me. I know I only have myself to blame. I’ve had plenty opportunities over the years to take them back from my parent’s before they became garage sale items and mice nests.

Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021

Supplied photo
Community correspondent Heather Innis is in search of a Weeble Wobble Haunted House, a beloved childhood toy.

Poetry to remind us to not be so serious

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Poetry to remind us to not be so serious

Heather Innis 3 minute read Thursday, Aug. 12, 2021

I hope that everyone is having a peaceful and restful summer, I am so thankful that we are finally able to safely get together with family, friends and loved ones.

As we enjoy the last few weeks of summer, I wanted to take this opportunity to share a couple of unpublished poems I wrote several years ago. When I read them now, I’m reminded to not take myself too seriously and that it’s okay to be silly once in a while.

I hope they make you smile!

☐ ☐ ☐

Thursday, Aug. 12, 2021

I hope that everyone is having a peaceful and restful summer, I am so thankful that we are finally able to safely get together with family, friends and loved ones.

As we enjoy the last few weeks of summer, I wanted to take this opportunity to share a couple of unpublished poems I wrote several years ago. When I read them now, I’m reminded to not take myself too seriously and that it’s okay to be silly once in a while.

I hope they make you smile!

☐ ☐ ☐

Leaving your comfort zone can be rewarding

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Leaving your comfort zone can be rewarding

Heather Innis 3 minute read Thursday, Jul. 15, 2021

I’ve often joked that the only way I’d agree to camp in a tent was if it was set up in a four‐star hotel room.

Growing up, my siblings and I would squeeze in the small, two‐person tent that my dad pitched in the backyard and pretend that trying to sleep in a hot, stuffy tent with flies and mosquitoes buzzing around our heads all night was actually fun.

It was not. And the bugs were merciless.

But since I’ve been working from home I’ve had more opportunities to appreciate nature. I began taking long walks around the neighbourhood during my lunch hour. Weather permitting, I frequently work outside in the backyard using the patio table as my desk. So this year I finally decided I would give camping a real try.

Thursday, Jul. 15, 2021

Photo by Heather Innis
Hope Innis (and her doll, Joss) enjoyed her first family camping trip.

Mommy Bunny a reminder of nature’s wonder

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Mommy Bunny a reminder of nature’s wonder

Heather Innis 3 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 16, 2021

One of the sure signs of emerging summer in Windsor Park is the appearance of all the little brown and grey bunnies. They seem to be everywhere: in the parks, playgrounds, backyards, and everywhere in between.

If you’re like many residents here, you probably have mixed feelings about these furry little creatures.

On the one hand, there’s no denying they are adorable, with their big black eyes and cute little perky ears. However, bunnies can also be a real nuisance. My family has lived in this neighbourhood for over 10 years, and every single year our vegetable garden is raided by bunnies who treat it as their personal all‐you‐can‐eat buffet.

This year, a mommy bunny decided to make a nest for her babies in our backyard. When my husband pointed out where it was, it looked just like a small pile of dead grass that I never would have noticed. Although I had recently spotted a bunny hanging around our place more than usual, once I learned about the nest I began paying more attention.

Wednesday, Jun. 16, 2021

Sasha Sefter / Winnipeg Free Press photo archives
Working from home has enabled correspondent Heather Innis to commune with nature, including a family of rabbits that has nested in her back yard.

Committed to caring for those less fortunate

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Committed to caring for those less fortunate

Heather Innis 3 minute read Wednesday, May. 5, 2021

What began a few years ago as an occasional trip to the Main Street strip as a peer support worker, then evolved to handing out sandwiches to hungry Winnipeggers has now become what long-time Windsor Park resident Tracey Wenham calls “the Angel Wings with Love project.”

Together with a core group of volunteers who venture out to various inner-city neighbourhoods and tent communities several times a week, Wenham and her crew hand out food, toiletries, blankets and clothes to those in need.

But perhaps the most important thing she offers is conversation and companionship:

“I’m there to be with the people,” she told me. “They are my focus.”

Wednesday, May. 5, 2021

Supplied photo
Tracey Wenham shows off one of the sleeping mats she makes from old plastic grocery bags and deliver to those less fortunate as part of her Angel Wings With Love project.

Remember – we are all special and unique

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Remember – we are all special and unique

Heather Innis 3 minute read Wednesday, Mar. 3, 2021

It’s hard to be stuck indoors all the time, especially when we cannot meet with friends and loved ones and it’s too cold to go for long walks.

I would like to encourage everyone who feels like they’re stuck in a ‘pandemic pause’ to consider this time as an opportunity to really appreciate all of life’s blessings and to develop a thankful mindset. (I’ve recently started practicing daily gratitude and have found that it greatly improves my mood.)

If you find yourself feeling really stressed and anxious, you could try reaching out to talk to a friend you haven’t spoken to in a while, or perhaps try some guided meditation. There are also lots of online videos and apps for exercising at home that don’t require gym equipment.

When you take a moment to pause and reflect, I also encourage you to consider how much of our time we spend criticizing and judging others or worrying about what other people think of us.     

Wednesday, Mar. 3, 2021

It’s hard to be stuck indoors all the time, especially when we cannot meet with friends and loved ones and it’s too cold to go for long walks.

I would like to encourage everyone who feels like they’re stuck in a ‘pandemic pause’ to consider this time as an opportunity to really appreciate all of life’s blessings and to develop a thankful mindset. (I’ve recently started practicing daily gratitude and have found that it greatly improves my mood.)

If you find yourself feeling really stressed and anxious, you could try reaching out to talk to a friend you haven’t spoken to in a while, or perhaps try some guided meditation. There are also lots of online videos and apps for exercising at home that don’t require gym equipment.

When you take a moment to pause and reflect, I also encourage you to consider how much of our time we spend criticizing and judging others or worrying about what other people think of us.     

Skating is not ‘just like riding a bike’

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Skating is not ‘just like riding a bike’

Heather Innis 3 minute read Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2021

At this time of year I’m usually hibernating with a good book and a French vanilla latte. But one of my goals is to be more active and so my daughter and I have found ourselves going for frequent walks around our neighbourhood.

It was on one of these walks that we made a wonderful discovery — a ‘new’ skating rink tucked in behind Winakwa Community Centre (980 Winakwa Rd.).

Hope was awestruck — she had never been skating before and was eager to try it out. I ordered us each a pair of skates and a few days later we all trekked over to the community centre for some outdoor fun and exercise.

Full disclosure: Although I was an avid skater when I was young, I have only been on skates once or twice as an adult and it didn’t go well.

Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2021

Photo by Heather Innis
Hope, the daughter of correspondent Heather Innis, love her first time on skates and can’t wait to go skating again. Her mother? Not so much.

Never more ready for a new year

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Never more ready for a new year

Heather Innis 3 minute read Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2020

As we reflect on the past year, I think we all deserve a ‘hall pass’ if few (or even none) of last year’s New Year’s resolutions were fulfilled.

I have renewed faith in setting high goals for 2021. Not to tempt fate, but it feels like things couldn’t get much worse than they did this past year — so why not shoot for the stars in the next one?

To achieve what I’ve coined ‘The Best Year Ever’, my first goal was to get a Franklin Planner, which is basically a fancy, paper-based time management system. In other words, it’s an expensive day planner that’s supposed to help you reach your goals.

After an extensive Google search, I realized that many of these planners were well out of my price range. In the end, I decided on a very affordable Go Girl Planner. While still functioning as a day planner, it also has sections for writing out your overall life goals, as well as your top goals for the upcoming year and for listing daily habits that will help you achieve those goals.

Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2020

Supplied photo
Armed with her trusty Go Girl Planner, Heather Innis is prepared to make 2021 the 'Best Year Ever'.

No better time than the present to shop local

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No better time than the present to shop local

Heather Innis 3 minute read Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2020

While we can all probably agree this holiday season will be unlike any other, it is now more important than ever to consider shopping local small businesses, artisans and makers for all your gift giving and home decor needs.

To be honest, I’m usually one of those last-minute shoppers who barely makes it into the store minutes before closing, fingers crossed that the item I want is still available. But since that’s not an option this year, it’s the perfect opportunity to start shopping early and locally. Fortunately for shoppers, there is no shortage of talent in our city!

One of the handmade gifts I recently purchased was made by Windsor Park resident Julie Corthey. Her business, Dips’n’Dots, specializes in customized items such as wood art, ornaments, mugs and glassware, as well as refinished furniture.

While Corthey enjoys creating designs using her Silhouette Cameo to make personalized gifts, it was her love of dot art that first sparked her interest in becoming a maker.

Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2020

Supplied photo by Julie Corthey
A sample of the kind of customized items created by Julie Corthey of Dips’n’Dots.

Remember to be good to yourself, too

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Remember to be good to yourself, too

Heather Innis 2 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020

As the global pandemic wears on, there’s been a lot of talk about self-care. Everywhere you look on the internet there’s advice for how to eat healthier or the best way to exercise at home.

But what I want to talk about is the kind of self-care that doesn’t require a great deal of planning or scheduling. It doesn’t involve excessive research into the best way to do this or that, and it certainly doesn’t require having the self-discipline to get up at 5:30 a.m. to exercise, meditate and then prepare a healthy meal plan for the rest of the day.

It’s just about being kind to yourself.

It’s one of the simplest forms of self-care, but also one that is often overlooked. It’s recognizing that sometimes just getting out of bed in the morning is a victory and worthy of celebration. It’s taking a moment to smile (or better yet, have a good laugh) at the absurdity of the moment when the first from-scratch meal you made in weeks accidentally becomes the cat’s dinner.

Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020

As the global pandemic wears on, there’s been a lot of talk about self-care. Everywhere you look on the internet there’s advice for how to eat healthier or the best way to exercise at home.

But what I want to talk about is the kind of self-care that doesn’t require a great deal of planning or scheduling. It doesn’t involve excessive research into the best way to do this or that, and it certainly doesn’t require having the self-discipline to get up at 5:30 a.m. to exercise, meditate and then prepare a healthy meal plan for the rest of the day.

It’s just about being kind to yourself.

It’s one of the simplest forms of self-care, but also one that is often overlooked. It’s recognizing that sometimes just getting out of bed in the morning is a victory and worthy of celebration. It’s taking a moment to smile (or better yet, have a good laugh) at the absurdity of the moment when the first from-scratch meal you made in weeks accidentally becomes the cat’s dinner.

The real truth about pandemic parenting

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The real truth about pandemic parenting

Heather Innis 2 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020

It seems like over the past several months that a lot of the parenting and ‘how-to’ articles have focused on coping — even thriving — during the current global pandemic.

Many of these writers seem to have all the answers for how to work effectively and efficiently from home, the “right way” to home school your children (as if there actually was a “right way”, which I highly doubt), and lots of suggestions for how to stay safe, sane and happy while being stuck within the confines of your home.

But not to worry. This isn’t one of those annoying how-to articles. It’s also not one of those “I-must-be-a-failure-as-a-parent-because-I-let-my-kids-eat-cookies-for-breakfast-one-morning-instead-of-homemade-yogurt-with-organic-berries-and-freshly-squeezed-orange-juice” stories. And it is most definitely not a “Top five strategies for effective home schooling” pieces which makes you wonder just exactly who these folks are that have all the time and energy to make a diorama of an endangered species habitat out of nothing but recycled pieces of plastic and cardboard.

Nope. I wish, just for once, someone would tell it like it really is — that we are not complete failures as human beings because we haven’t learned a new language or taken up a musical instrument while locked down in quarantine. That it is OK if you’ve let your housekeeping skills get a bit rusty or you just can’t bring yourself to finish off a home improvement project you ambitiously started in April. That so-called “staycations” aren’t nearly as much fun when you are forced to have one, instead of doing it by choice. And that it is more important for your child to remain healthy and happy — both physically and emotionally — than forcing them to memorize the multiplication tables. And that if your kids occasionally have cookies for breakfast it doesn’t mean you’re a failure as a parent.

Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020

It seems like over the past several months that a lot of the parenting and ‘how-to’ articles have focused on coping — even thriving — during the current global pandemic.

Many of these writers seem to have all the answers for how to work effectively and efficiently from home, the “right way” to home school your children (as if there actually was a “right way”, which I highly doubt), and lots of suggestions for how to stay safe, sane and happy while being stuck within the confines of your home.

But not to worry. This isn’t one of those annoying how-to articles. It’s also not one of those “I-must-be-a-failure-as-a-parent-because-I-let-my-kids-eat-cookies-for-breakfast-one-morning-instead-of-homemade-yogurt-with-organic-berries-and-freshly-squeezed-orange-juice” stories. And it is most definitely not a “Top five strategies for effective home schooling” pieces which makes you wonder just exactly who these folks are that have all the time and energy to make a diorama of an endangered species habitat out of nothing but recycled pieces of plastic and cardboard.

Nope. I wish, just for once, someone would tell it like it really is — that we are not complete failures as human beings because we haven’t learned a new language or taken up a musical instrument while locked down in quarantine. That it is OK if you’ve let your housekeeping skills get a bit rusty or you just can’t bring yourself to finish off a home improvement project you ambitiously started in April. That so-called “staycations” aren’t nearly as much fun when you are forced to have one, instead of doing it by choice. And that it is more important for your child to remain healthy and happy — both physically and emotionally — than forcing them to memorize the multiplication tables. And that if your kids occasionally have cookies for breakfast it doesn’t mean you’re a failure as a parent.

Conquering anxiety at the grocery store

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Conquering anxiety at the grocery store

Heather Innis 3 minute read Tuesday, Jul. 14, 2020

I decided to share this story because I think it’s important for others who may have similar feelings or experiences to know they’re not alone. No one is perfect — and that is perfectly fine.

I’ve never made a secret of the fact I live with anxiety. During the first few weeks of quarantine, my daughter and I went for walks every day and we strictly obeyed the shelter-in-place orders. When something was needed from the store, I’d always send my husband.

Truthfully, the thought terrified me — I feared my anxiety would overwhelm me and I’d forget to practise physical distancing. I worried if I did practise physical distancing that I’d offend someone. What if I said or did the wrong thing? Mostly, I was afraid all these worries would lead to a full-fledged panic attack.

Eventually, I realized I had to face this fear before it evolved into a phobia.

Tuesday, Jul. 14, 2020

Dreamstime.com
Grocery shopping during the COVID-19 pandemic can be, and has been, an anxious experience for many.

Adopting a new ‘furever’ friend

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Adopting a new ‘furever’ friend

Heather Innis 3 minute read Tuesday, May. 19, 2020

With our daughter Hope out of school until at least September and with us working from home, my husband and I decided that now might be the perfect time to adopt a kitten.

We did not make this decision lightly. Adopting a cat (or any animal, for that matter) into your family requires a lasting commitment from everyone. In addition to the costs associated with providing healthy food, having appropriate supplies, visits to the veterinary clinic, and so forth, perhaps the most important consideration is being able to promise your new family member the time, patience, and love it will need for many years to come.

Many cats live up to 20 years (or more), so one important issue we had to take into consideration was the fact that just because we are all working and studying from home now, this will almost certainly change in the upcoming months. However, since we’ve had a cat before (Phoebe passed away when Hope was four), we at least know what we’re signing up for.

Upon learning we were going to adopt a kitten, the first thing my daughter did — after squealing for joy and doing a happy dance of course — was immerse herself in research. She spent several weeks learning how to care for a kitten. She learned the importance of how to correctly hold them, the best way to set up a feeding area, and even the importance of cleaning the litter box on a regular basis, since the latter would primarily be her responsibility.

Tuesday, May. 19, 2020

Supplied photo by Andrea Vaile
Pumpkin is the newest addition to the Innis family in Windsor Park.

Ah, the joy of… sticks

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Ah, the joy of… sticks

Heather Innis 3 minute read Tuesday, Apr. 21, 2020

I’ve been thinking a lot about sticks lately.

Like many kids, my daughter Hope never misses an opportunity to pick up a lone stick lying on the grass and use it as a magic wand, a spoon, a shovel or whatever else her imagination comes up with. Even if we had a yard filled with toys, she would still find that lone stick lying in the grass and incorporate it into whatever game she was playing.

So why have sticks been occupying my thoughts?

Well, since I’ve started working from home a few weeks ago, Hope and I have been going for a lot of walks. Not surprisingly, she always manages to find a stick along the way and proceeds to bring it with her on our journey. Sometimes the stick functions as a cane. Sometimes it’s used for pointing (“Hey mom, look at that bird’s nest!”). Other times it’s used as a shovel or to poke at something fascinating to nine-year-olds, such as icy puddles, mounds of mud or mysterious little crevices in the cement.

Tuesday, Apr. 21, 2020

Dreamstime.com
A simple stick can be the greatest plaything for some children. Let their imaginations run freely.

The story of Little Bunny

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The story of Little Bunny

Heather Innis 3 minute read Monday, Mar. 23, 2020

For children, this is an especially difficult time, being away from friends and classmates.

Even as grownups, many of us feel powerless. When I wrote the following children’s story, I had no way of knowing we’d be experiencing a global pandemic, forcing closures, quarantines and social isolation.

However, now more than ever I think it’s important to remember that we all have our own special gifts that we can use to help others.

What can you do to help someone today?

Monday, Mar. 23, 2020

Dreamstime.com
All Little Bunny had to do was be the very best thing she could be.

Hearing aids make a big difference

Heather Innis 3 minute read Preview

Hearing aids make a big difference

Heather Innis 3 minute read Monday, Feb. 24, 2020

For several years now, my co-workers have complained that I frequently ask them to repeat themselves.

Since I’m usually the first point of contact for people who come into the office, I’ve gotten in the habit of leaning forward so that I am closer to the speaker but lately I’ve had to get up and walk around my desk so as to talk face-to-face. At home, I am constantly accusing my husband of “mumbling” and reminding my daughter that I can’t hear what she’s saying if she’s speaking in a different room.

I decided it was finally time to swallow my pride and look into the possibility of hearing aids. According to the Canadian Hearing Services website, one in four Canadians identify as experiencing hearing loss (https://www.chs.ca/facts-and-figures). Although my hearing impairment is considered mild, it affects the mid-range frequencies (which includes voices, for example) which is why I’ve been experiencing particular difficulty carrying on conversations.

I’m currently trying out a set of hearing aids for a month. Other than the fact they make my ear itchy, I’ve been pleasantly surprised what a difference they make. I found out that I can easily carry on a conversation with my husband, even while sitting across from each other in a noisy restaurant. It turns out my husband wasn’t mumbling after all! I’ve discovered that my home office printer makes a humming sound I’ve never noticed before. I’ve also come to find that while I’ve always considered myself to have a rather loud voice, if I talk in what was previously my normal tone I realize now that I was, in fact. practically shouting. I can now hear what other people are saying to me without asking them to speak louder or repeat themselves and I can actually hear what my daughter is saying to me when she calls out from another room.

Monday, Feb. 24, 2020

For several years now, my co-workers have complained that I frequently ask them to repeat themselves.

Since I’m usually the first point of contact for people who come into the office, I’ve gotten in the habit of leaning forward so that I am closer to the speaker but lately I’ve had to get up and walk around my desk so as to talk face-to-face. At home, I am constantly accusing my husband of “mumbling” and reminding my daughter that I can’t hear what she’s saying if she’s speaking in a different room.

I decided it was finally time to swallow my pride and look into the possibility of hearing aids. According to the Canadian Hearing Services website, one in four Canadians identify as experiencing hearing loss (https://www.chs.ca/facts-and-figures). Although my hearing impairment is considered mild, it affects the mid-range frequencies (which includes voices, for example) which is why I’ve been experiencing particular difficulty carrying on conversations.

I’m currently trying out a set of hearing aids for a month. Other than the fact they make my ear itchy, I’ve been pleasantly surprised what a difference they make. I found out that I can easily carry on a conversation with my husband, even while sitting across from each other in a noisy restaurant. It turns out my husband wasn’t mumbling after all! I’ve discovered that my home office printer makes a humming sound I’ve never noticed before. I’ve also come to find that while I’ve always considered myself to have a rather loud voice, if I talk in what was previously my normal tone I realize now that I was, in fact. practically shouting. I can now hear what other people are saying to me without asking them to speak louder or repeat themselves and I can actually hear what my daughter is saying to me when she calls out from another room.

The wisdom of Bob Ross

Heather Innis 3 minute read Preview

The wisdom of Bob Ross

Heather Innis 3 minute read Monday, Feb. 3, 2020

Like many of us, I’m guilty of falling down the proverbial rabbit hole known as the internet from time to time.

On this occasion, I came across a YouTube video of regular folks (i.e., non-artists) enjoying what they called a “Bob Ross Paint Night”. I had heard of The Joy of Painting author and PBS television host before but had never given him much thought. But since I’ve recently started dabbling in watercolour painting for fun and relaxation, I thought I’d give his tutorials a try (even though he used oil paints as his medium of choice).

Since watching his tutorials, I’ve also come to recognize some of his much-loved catch phrases and would like to share with you some of my favourite Bob Ross quotes (and why I like them so much):

 “There are no mistakes, only happy accidents.”

Monday, Feb. 3, 2020

Like many of us, I’m guilty of falling down the proverbial rabbit hole known as the internet from time to time.

On this occasion, I came across a YouTube video of regular folks (i.e., non-artists) enjoying what they called a “Bob Ross Paint Night”. I had heard of The Joy of Painting author and PBS television host before but had never given him much thought. But since I’ve recently started dabbling in watercolour painting for fun and relaxation, I thought I’d give his tutorials a try (even though he used oil paints as his medium of choice).

Since watching his tutorials, I’ve also come to recognize some of his much-loved catch phrases and would like to share with you some of my favourite Bob Ross quotes (and why I like them so much):

 “There are no mistakes, only happy accidents.”

Hendricks out to capture subject’s true essence

Heather Innis 3 minute read Preview

Hendricks out to capture subject’s true essence

Heather Innis 3 minute read Sunday, Dec. 1, 2019

A local photographer it out to capture the essence of breast cancer survivors in a new project.

Bruce Hendricks is a master photographer and four-time Manitoba Photographer of the Year recipient, awarded by the provincial chapter of the Professional Photographers Association of Canada. His company “Impact Photographic Design” offers a wide range of professional photography services including portrait, wall décor, commercial, public relations and branding, as well as wedding/event photography. His full list of awards and accolades are too many to list here but he is certainly one of the most accomplished professional photographers in Manitoba, if not throughout all of Canada.

However, what brought me to Hendricks’ home studio recently was to discuss a project he is currently working on that would shine a unique spotlight on the lives and experiences of breast cancer survivors. According to the Canadian Cancer Society (www.cancer.ca), breast cancer is the second most prevalent form of cancer in women. In fact, this year alone almost 27,000 women will be diagnosed with this disease. Chances are that someone you know is currently living with breast cancer, which makes this endeavour even more timely and important.

As a photographer, Hendricks says the most critical aspect for him is that his photos capture the true essence and spirit of breast cancer survivors as they live their lives to the fullest and continue to enjoy their favourite activities in life, whether it be having tea with a friend, making cookies with a grandchild or even just relaxing with friends and family.

Sunday, Dec. 1, 2019

Photo by Ross Outerbridge
Local photographer Bruce Hendricks is working on a project intended to shine a spotlight on the lives and experiences of breast cancer survivors.

Scary reminders to be vigilant when driving

Heather Innis 3 minute read Preview

Scary reminders to be vigilant when driving

Heather Innis 3 minute read Monday, Aug. 12, 2019

There comes a time in almost everyone’s life when they realize that a single moment could change everything.

I recently visited a close friend in the hospital who had been in a serious motor vehicle collision. A driver’s split-second moment of inattention and she will now be in hospital for at least a month, with many months of painful out-patient physiotherapy to follow.

She can’t work, drive, or run and play with her young daughter. It was a moment that changed everything but she knows it could have been a lot worse and feels blessed to still be around to watch her daughter grow up.

A couple of days before my friend’s accident, my daughter and I were planning on visiting a couple garage sales. As I turned the corner from my house, I discovered that the street was blocked by cars stopped at a garage sale at the end of my block. I’m still not sure how it happened, only that I was caught unawares and feeling somewhat frazzled but I pulled into a neighbour’s driveway to turn around and go the other way when — BAM! — I backed up right into a parked car.

Monday, Aug. 12, 2019

There comes a time in almost everyone’s life when they realize that a single moment could change everything.

I recently visited a close friend in the hospital who had been in a serious motor vehicle collision. A driver’s split-second moment of inattention and she will now be in hospital for at least a month, with many months of painful out-patient physiotherapy to follow.

She can’t work, drive, or run and play with her young daughter. It was a moment that changed everything but she knows it could have been a lot worse and feels blessed to still be around to watch her daughter grow up.

A couple of days before my friend’s accident, my daughter and I were planning on visiting a couple garage sales. As I turned the corner from my house, I discovered that the street was blocked by cars stopped at a garage sale at the end of my block. I’m still not sure how it happened, only that I was caught unawares and feeling somewhat frazzled but I pulled into a neighbour’s driveway to turn around and go the other way when — BAM! — I backed up right into a parked car.

Oh, right… camping can be fun

Heather Innis 3 minute read Preview

Oh, right… camping can be fun

Heather Innis 3 minute read Tuesday, Jul. 16, 2019

I’ve never really been what you might call “outdoorsy”.

Even as a child, I would rather hide away in a quiet corner of the house with my nose in a book than play outside. When it comes to camping, I’ve jokingly said that I’d have no problem at all sleeping in a tent — as long as it was located inside a four-star hotel suite.

So, when a good friend of mine recently invited my daughter and me to join her and her daughter for a night of camping at Falcon Lake, I was hesitant at first.

On one hand, I hadn’t seen Jen for several months and loved the idea of spending time with her. As an added bonus, our daughters get along quite well together.

Tuesday, Jul. 16, 2019

I’ve never really been what you might call “outdoorsy”.

Even as a child, I would rather hide away in a quiet corner of the house with my nose in a book than play outside. When it comes to camping, I’ve jokingly said that I’d have no problem at all sleeping in a tent — as long as it was located inside a four-star hotel suite.

So, when a good friend of mine recently invited my daughter and me to join her and her daughter for a night of camping at Falcon Lake, I was hesitant at first.

On one hand, I hadn’t seen Jen for several months and loved the idea of spending time with her. As an added bonus, our daughters get along quite well together.