Jim Maloway

Jim Maloway

Elmwood constituency report

Jim Maloway is the NDP MLA for Elmwood.

Recent articles of Jim Maloway

Catalytic converter thefts may increase 240%

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Catalytic converter thefts may increase 240%

Jim Maloway 2 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 13, 2022

It seems every Manitoban knows someone who has had a catalytic converter stolen. Thanks to the exorbitant price of the precious metals in the catalytic converters and the lack of theft-prevention tools, these thefts by organized groups of criminals will continue at a record pace.

In the first five months of 2022, a total of 1,248 Manitoba Public Insurance claims were made for catalytic converter thefts. This is almost the entire total of 2021 claims: 1,564. With the summer in full swing, this trend is projected to hit almost 3,000 claims for 2022, a projected increase of 240 per cent over 2021. The increase from 2020 to 2021 was already a whopping 450 per cent. Not every theft is claimed, so these thefts are underreported, and each claim represents a ‘betterment fees’ cost to Manitoba drivers of as much as $2,500.

This June the provincial government passed what is, in many ways, a copy of the Scrap Metal Recycling Act I first introduced in the spring of 2021, aimed at curtailing these thefts. However, the bill has not yet become law, and everyone should now know that more needs to be done if we are to reduce these thefts, which are spiking all across Canada and the U.S.

Every car dealer in Manitoba should be required to mark or etch a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) on the catalytic converter of every new and used vehicle sold. This part, often valued around $800 or higher, doesn’t have an identifying part number, and therefore can’t be tied to the vehicle. The Manitoba government should direct Manitoba Public Insurance to issue credits to Manitoba drivers who engrave their catalytic converters with their vehicle’s VIN numbers. Both these measures would greatly help enforcement and reduce the theft.

Wednesday, Jul. 13, 2022

Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway visited Miles Macdonell Collegiate students as they put the finishing touches on their outdoor classroom project made possible by Green Communities Canada.

About time government stood up for consumers

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About time government stood up for consumers

Jim Maloway 2 minute read Wednesday, May. 25, 2022

More measures are needed to prevent catalytic converter theft. In 2020, Manitoba Public Insurance reported 400 calims for stolen catalytic converters. In 2021 there were 2,200 claims – a 450 per cent increase.

I’m worried the numbers are going to be even bigger for 2022, and many claims go unreported. As long as precious metals such as rhodium, palladium, and platinum are worth thousands of dollars an ounce these thefts will continue. Organized groups of criminals have a shopping list of vehicle types and it’s not uncommon for a stolen converter to fetch up to $800. MPI covers the replacement cost but charges a betterment fee.

There are ways we can combat catalytic converter theft. I’ve introduced Bill 232, the Catalytic Converter Identification Act, which would require motor vehicle dealers in the province to mark the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) on the catalytic converters of every vehicle sold by a dealership, including new and used vehicles. The purpose of the marking or etching would be to identify the catalytic converter to a specific vehicle, something that’s currently not possible. All vehicles sold in dealerships end up on a hoist at one time or another for inspections or repair, and this additional etching could be done at minimal cost and inconvenience. The provincial government should order MPI to offer substantial discounts to Manitoba drivers who have their catalytic converters engraved with VIN numbers, to incentivize people to get it done. Legislation like Bill 232 would be a meaningful step in catalytic converter theft prevention and one more tool in the fight against thefts occurring across the province.

Around a year ago I introduced legislation aimed at organized groups of criminals stealing catalytic converters and precious scrap metals by prohibiting cash sales of these goods and requiring proper documentation and record keeping for five years. Rather than pass my private member’s bill, the Progressive Conservative government introduced similar legislation of its own which will hopefully soon be passed into law.

Wednesday, May. 25, 2022

Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway is pictured with Sonia Klymenko, one of five Columbia House residents who had their catalytic converters stolen in their building’s parking lot this spring.

John King: A champion for Elmwood

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John King: A champion for Elmwood

Jim Maloway 3 minute read Wednesday, Apr. 6, 2022

On March 4, 2022, Elmwood lost one of its favourite sons. John King left us suddenly, leaving behind not only his loving family and many, many friends, but a community that benefitted enormously from his lifelong activism.

John’s love for Elmwood was deeply rooted in his sense of fairness, particularly when it came to young people. For any community to grow and prosper, John knew young people needed opportunities to do the same. He wanted to give back, and he did so royally.

John grew up in Elmwood and graduated from Elmwood High School in 1970. In 1978, he married the love of his life, Linda, who lived just down the street from the King household on Johnson Avenue, and together they raised three children, Bret, Ashley, and Meghan.

John’s professional career centred on youth in crisis until he retired after 37 years service with the federal government. His early life experience as an accomplished athlete eventually led him to coaching when his kids began playing sports. Boxing, hockey, baseball, and curling came naturally to John, who honed his athletic skills at the nearby Kelvin Community Club. Notably, John represented Manitoba in the 1971 Canada Games as a boxer and was a Golden Gloves champion.

Wednesday, Apr. 6, 2022

John King with Clara Hughes at the opening of the Clara Hughes Recreation Park in November 2013.

A clear plan is needed

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A clear plan is needed

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA constituency report 4 minute read Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022

Canada’s COVID-19 data shows the Omicron infection rate peaked on Jan. 10 and 11. Since then, daily infections have been trending down. However, these rates of infection were still higher than anything we’d experienced in the previous waves. Omicron continues to take its toll on our healthcare system with its exponential infection rate and the attendant spike in hospitalizations, with the Canada-wide peak in hospitalizations occurring two weeks later.Here in Manitoba, hospitalizations had  decreased 19.2 per cent from the previous week as of Feb. 8. Intensive care unit admissions had decreased 19 per cent from the previous week. While this is positive news that we are hopefully starting to make it out of the Omicron wave, hospitalizations are still extremely high, resulting in patients being transferred throughout Manitoba, far away from their loved ones and support systems because there are not enough staffed beds, and surgeries continue to be cancelled.While Manitoba’s public health authorities know fully-vaccinated Manitobans are extremely well protected from the worst effects of COVID-19, those not fully vaccinated, including those  who have received only one dose of a vaccine, are at greater risk.Immunocompromised Manitobans need to complete their full vaccination schedules. In Manitoba, people who are not fully vaccinated are four times more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19, nine times more likely to be admitted to an intensive care unit, and 10 times more likely to die. That’s why public health authorities are encouraging Manitobans to get their vaccinations and booster shots, because that’s the best way to protect yourself, your family, and our community, from the worst effects of COVID-19.We are hopeful that soon we should be able to dial back quarantine rules and get closer to normalcy. We need to manage the vaccine rollouts and balance the health measures. These are manageable things we can do to minimize disruption. For example, quarantine times for Omicron have been cut as more and more information is collected. The bottom line is that we must live with the virus, and so the challenge is to figure out how to do so safely without jeopardizing our healthcare system.  If you have any questions about provincial programs, feel free to contact me at 204-415-1122 or email me at Jim.Maloway@yourmanitoba.ca

Canada’s COVID-19 data shows the Omicron infection rate peaked on Jan. 10 and 11. Since then, daily infections have been trending down. However, these rates of infection were still higher than anything we’d experienced in the previous waves. Omicron continues to take its toll on our healthcare system with its exponential infection rate and the attendant spike in hospitalizations, with the Canada-wide peak in hospitalizations occurring two weeks later.

Here in Manitoba, hospitalizations had  decreased 19.2 per cent from the previous week as of Feb. 8. Intensive care unit admissions had decreased 19 per cent from the previous week. While this is positive news that we are hopefully starting to make it out of the Omicron wave, hospitalizations are still extremely high, resulting in patients being transferred throughout Manitoba, far away from their loved ones and support systems because there are not enough staffed beds, and surgeries continue to be cancelled.

While Manitoba’s public health authorities know fully-vaccinated Manitobans are extremely well protected from the worst effects of COVID-19, those not fully vaccinated, including those  who have received only one dose of a vaccine, are at greater risk.

Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022

Supplied photo
Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway delivers KN95 masks from his MLA allotment to Elmwood resident Roy Mestdagh. Thousands of masks were delivered to Elmwood residents in January 2022.

Converter theft, right-to-repair deserve attention

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

Converter theft, right-to-repair deserve attention

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2021

Since my last column in November, the provincial government showed movement on the issue of catalytic converter theft by introducing legislation during the most recent sitting of the Manitoba legislature. Unfortunately, the Progressive Conservative government continues to be silent on the consumer right to repair. While the U.S. federal government and 50 state governments have all begun their right to repair journeys, following Europe’s example, Canada and our provincial government remain asleep at the switch, and consumers and a sustainable economy will be the worse for it. On Dec. 3, the last day our recent sitting I re-introduced my two right to repair bills from the previous session. Bill 214 concerns electronic devices, including smartphones, and Bill 216 addresses farm machinery. The objective of these bills is to level the playing field for Manitoba consumers by forcing manufacturers to make products that are better designed, last longer, and which can be repaired  — just like in Europe. The government introduced its catalytic converter legislation a full six months after we took the lead and introduced our bill. Unfortunately, until the bill is passed, and rules are in place preventing scrap dealers from accepting cash payments, these thefts by organized criminals will continue, costing Manitobans about $2,000 per replacement. The government’s bill differs from Bill 215, the private member’s bill I first introduced in May 2021. Although both would end cash payments and impose financial penalties, our bill is aimed at organized criminals by doubling the proposed fines and giving the court system the option to administer prison sentences.An obvious benefit of highlighting issues such as catalytic converter thefts in The Herald and in my mailers to Elmwood constituents is that residents have an opportunity to provide feedback. That’s why I’ll be asking the province to require that scrap metal dealers post catalytic converter serial numbers online so MPI can check them. That’s just one improvement we’ll be bringing forward when the legislature returns in the spring.Season’s greetings, merry Christmas, and a happy, and above all safe, New Year to all.If you have any questions about other provincial programs, feel free to contact me at 204-415-1122 or email me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.ca. Please take a moment as well to visit my web site at www.yourelmwood.com

Since my last column in November, the provincial government showed movement on the issue of catalytic converter theft by introducing legislation during the most recent sitting of the Manitoba legislature. 

Unfortunately, the Progressive Conservative government continues to be silent on the consumer right to repair. While the U.S. federal government and 50 state governments have all begun their right to repair journeys, following Europe’s example, Canada and our provincial government remain asleep at the switch, and consumers and a sustainable economy will be the worse for it. 

On Dec. 3, the last day our recent sitting I re-introduced my two right to repair bills from the previous session. Bill 214 concerns electronic devices, including smartphones, and Bill 216 addresses farm machinery. The objective of these bills is to level the playing field for Manitoba consumers by forcing manufacturers to make products that are better designed, last longer, and which can be repaired  — just like in Europe. 

Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2021

Supplied photo
Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway, who first introduced legislation aimed at curbing the theft of catalytic converters in May, is pictured outside a scrap metal dealer.

Manitoba must legislate the right to repair

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

Manitoba must legislate the right to repair

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021

When U.S. President Joe Biden issued sweeping right-to-repair orders to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission this summer to develop rules to promote product repairability, he was tackling one important pillar of the right to repair movement. Europe has taken the leading role in right-to-repair by forcing manufacturers to make products that are better designed, last longer, and have repairability. They are also forced to provide spare parts and repair services that are affordable. And finally, the small business repair sector has access to the manuals they need to carry out repairs on a wide range of electronic products, including smartphones. Small business repair shops will also have access to the right training and the right tools so reparable products don’t end up on the scrap heap.This past year, the European Commission announced plans for right-to-repair rules for smartphones, tablets and laptops, and some countries have begun introducing legislation. Even before President Biden’s orders, all fifty states had right-to-repair bills in the mill, although only Massachusetts has made it into law. Some states, such as South Carolina have focused on agricultural-related legislation. Others, like Californi,a have focused on medical equipment. It’s time for Manitoba to legislate the right to repair. Manufacturers must be required to maintain and repair their many electronic products at reasonable priced, including smartphones, or replace the electronic product or refund its purchase price when requested to do so by the purchaser. We need to follow the European example.The province also needs to address the epidemic of catalytic converter thefts across the province caused by organized crime. We need simple rules changes for scrap metal dealers that would disallow anonymous, cash-only transactions, as exist now in Alberta, and provide meaningful deterrents to these organized criminals.  If you have any questions, please contact me by emailing me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.ca or calling my office at 204-415-1122.

When U.S. President Joe Biden issued sweeping right-to-repair orders to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission this summer to develop rules to promote product repairability, he was tackling one important pillar of the right to repair movement. 

Europe has taken the leading role in right-to-repair by forcing manufacturers to make products that are better designed, last longer, and have repairability. They are also forced to provide spare parts and repair services that are affordable. And finally, the small business repair sector has access to the manuals they need to carry out repairs on a wide range of electronic products, including smartphones. Small business repair shops will also have access to the right training and the right tools so reparable products don’t end up on the scrap heap.

This past year, the European Commission announced plans for right-to-repair rules for smartphones, tablets and laptops, and some countries have begun introducing legislation. 

Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021

Supplied photo
Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway is pictured with resident Nikki Patel, who had the catalytic converter stolen from his vehicle.

New Louise Bridge update – so far, so good

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

New Louise Bridge update – so far, so good

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Friday, Oct. 22, 2021

 

The new Louise Bridge replacement timeline has become clearer — and it’s good news for northeast Winnipeg residents. Last month, city planners made public their recommendation to build the new Louise Bridge beside the current bridge, which is exactly what Elmwood residents were hoping for. Although the new bridge will be placed just west of the old bridge and not east, as originally planned, it’s a relief to know traffic disruption will be avoided because the old bridge can stay open during construction.Northeast Winnipeg residents should be confident the planning stages are proceeding in an orderly way. City council will have final recommendations in the spring of 2022 — just a few months away. Notices were mailed out to affected property owners in mid-October, signalling the start of the final piece of the community consultation and the expropriation process. The six-lane design, including dedicated bus lanes in each direction, will require some expropriation of property.The time has come for the incoming new Premier to commit her government’s share of the funding for the replacement bridge. It’s good to know Elmwood residents will be able to use the old bridge for the two years the new bridge is under construction. Avoiding closure has always been a crucial aspect of the whole project. At the end of the day, we have to get the job done before the 110-year-old bridge is shut down for safety reasons. Northeast Winnipeggers have been patient but are keenly aware the clock is ticking. We need to keep the pressure on all three levels of government. You can help by visiting www.yourelmwood.com and participating in the survey on the new Louise Bridge replacement.If you have any questions about other provincial programs, feel free to contact me at 204-415-1122 or email me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.ca 

The new Louise Bridge replacement timeline has become clearer — and it’s good news for northeast Winnipeg residents. 

Last month, city planners made public their recommendation to build the new Louise Bridge beside the current bridge, which is exactly what Elmwood residents were hoping for. Although the new bridge will be placed just west of the old bridge and not east, as originally planned, it’s a relief to know traffic disruption will be avoided because the old bridge can stay open during construction.

Friday, Oct. 22, 2021

Supplied photo
Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway, Elmwood-East Kildonan city councillor Jason Schreyer and members of the New Louise Bridge committee pose near the bridge.

The Louise – a troubled bridge over waters

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The Louise – a troubled bridge over waters

Jim Maloway 4 minute read Monday, Sep. 27, 2021

Since the gunfight at OK Corral in 1881, the Louise Bridge has served as a vital link between northeast Winnipeg and the downtown. For the last 110 of those years, vehicular traffic of one kind or another has made its way across the now ‘functionally obsolete’ structure. We’ve gotten our money’s worth, but it’s time to pony up. The bridge’s base is beyond repair, and city engineers have sought to decommission and replace it since 2008. Northeast Winnipeg residents know they are driving over the Red River on borrowed time. In 2009, city planners drew up a list of major road improvements, and the Louise Bridge was rightfully given priority, and soon after placed on its 2011 Transportation Master Plan short-list.City engineers had to decide where the replacement bridge would be built and, for a while, it appeared a sure thing the site of the new bridge would be just east of the current bridge. The city even expropriated homes there.In 2014, when federal infrastructure funds became available, we thought everything was on track. However, the city’s administration didn’t ask for any money.  That’s when the New Louise Bridge Committee began its campaign. Our surveys confirmed residents wanted a new bridge beside the current bridge, with the old bridge kept open for local traffic. Our campaign spurred the NDP government to signal its firm commitment to partner with the city on replacing the Louise Bridge in its 2015 throne speech.Unfortunately, provincial infrastructure initiatives such the new Louise Bridge came to a halt with the election of the Progressive Conservative government in 2016. No effort has been made since to get this project underway.More recently, the city tethered the Louise Bridge replacement issue to its new Transportation Master Plan and Eastern Corridor Project. Its recommendations are just around the corner - “winter/spring 2022” - which is a bit behind the original schedule, but most welcome. City planners will be recommending a general alignment of a new bridge just a few yards west of its current site, not east as originally proposed.If you have any questions about other provincial programs, feel free to contact me at 204-415-1122 or email me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.ca

Since the gunfight at OK Corral in 1881, the Louise Bridge has served as a vital link between northeast Winnipeg and the downtown. 

For the last 110 of those years, vehicular traffic of one kind or another has made its way across the now ‘functionally obsolete’ structure. We’ve gotten our money’s worth, but it’s time to pony up. The bridge’s base is beyond repair, and city engineers have sought to decommission and replace it since 2008. Northeast Winnipeg residents know they are driving over the Red River on borrowed time. 

In 2009, city planners drew up a list of major road improvements, and the Louise Bridge was rightfully given priority, and soon after placed on its 2011 Transportation Master Plan short-list.

Monday, Sep. 27, 2021

Supplied photo
Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway dropped off 20,000 assorted McKenzie Seeds packets to Elmwood residents thispast sprin, and is pleased to see them pack a floral punch.

More measures needed to protect students

Jim Maloway 4 minute read Preview

More measures needed to protect students

Jim Maloway 4 minute read Thursday, Sep. 2, 2021

The new school year should be an exciting time for students, parents, and educators. Until recently, school divisions across the province had to come up with their own safety protocols regarding staff vaccinations and mask mandates. That’s why organizations like the Manitoba Teachers’ Society, parent groups, and many others were calling for the province to enact increased measures to protect our school population.Recent announcements, although delayed, are most welcome, and are a decent start on the things that need to be done to better protect students. The Manitoba government will now require all provincial employees who work with vulnerable populations to be fully immunized for COVID-19 by Oct. 31, or undergo regular testing, to protect Manitoba against a fourth COVID-19 wave.The PCs are also, after much backlash to its removal, bringing back the indoor mask mandate and will announce an expanded list of activities and services that can only be accessed by those who are fully immunized.The newly announced public health orders require all designated provincial public service workers who have ongoing contact with vulnerable populations, especially children, to be fully immunized or submit to testing up to three times per week.These employees will be required to be fully immunized with two doses of COVID-19 vaccine. The first dose needs to be completed by Sept. 7, the first day of school, and the second dose completed by Oct. 17.For more information on how to book a vaccine appointment, visit www.protectmb.ca/.These changes reflect some of the measures my NDP colleagues and I have been calling for. Additionally, we need more full-time teachers, substitutes, EAs, and clinicians, so we can reduce class sizes to keep kids safely distanced and give them the instruction they deserve. We’ve also been calling for vaccine clinics in schools to ensure easy access and culturally specific education for families, and more mental health supports for students, families and school staff. Lastly, we need standards for ventilation in schools and investment in HVAC upgrades and air purifiers. European governments have been acting on new ventilation guidelines for almost a year — it’s time for us to follow suit.If you have any questions about other provincial programs, feel free to contact me at 204-415-1122 or email me at Jim.Maloway@yourmanitoba.ca

The new school year should be an exciting time for students, parents, and educators. Until recently, school divisions across the province had to come up with their own safety protocols regarding staff vaccinations and mask mandates. That’s why organizations like the Manitoba Teachers’ Society, parent groups, and many others were calling for the province to enact increased measures to protect our school population.

Recent announcements, although delayed, are most welcome, and are a decent start on the things that need to be done to better protect students. The Manitoba government will now require all provincial employees who work with vulnerable populations to be fully immunized for COVID-19 by Oct. 31, or undergo regular testing, to protect Manitoba against a fourth COVID-19 wave.

The PCs are also, after much backlash to its removal, bringing back the indoor mask mandate and will announce an expanded list of activities and services that can only be accessed by those who are fully immunized.

Thursday, Sep. 2, 2021

Supplied photo
MLA Jim Maloway presents River Elm Elementary School Principal Marla Tran with two Kits for Kids loaded with school supplies donated by TELUS.

Combined sewer system must be a higher priority

Jim Maloway 4 minute read Preview

Combined sewer system must be a higher priority

Jim Maloway 4 minute read Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2021

On July 22, there was a 44-minute discharge of an estimated 0.096 megaLitres of untreated sewage into the Red River at the Munroe pumping station. That’s 96,000 litres of raw sewage. This incident was caused by a water main break and contributed to the 12 billion litres of raw sewage that pours into the Red and Assiniboine annually, mainly because of large wet weather events that cause wastewater and sewage to overflow our combined drainage system.The City of Winnipeg, in its 2022 budget process, is looking at raising its annual investment to reduce combined sewer overflows to $45 million from $30 million starting in 2023. It’s moving in this direction in response to a provincial directive to act on an agreed to target of an ‘85 per cent combined sewer overflow volume capture.’ The problem is, at this rate of funding, such modest goals won’t be reached until by 2095. That’s not good enough. The city needs the support of the province and the dederal government if Winnipeg homeowners are going to be properly protected from property damage, including basement flooding, and help address the environmental damage caused by phosphorus accumulating in Lake Winnipeg.Separating our combined sewer system is going to cost $2.3 billion according to the City’s 2017 Master Plan. It’s a big project, just like the $1.8 billion North End sewage treatment plant, and we have to get started on it now, just like the three levels of government are doing on the treatment plant These sewage discharges are commonplace and caused by unplanned events such as water main breaks and power failures. Some notable ones have occurred right here in Elmwood, including a massive 1.5 megalitre wastewater discharge at the Linden Pump station, equivalent to half an Olympic swimming pool, in October 2019.  A power failure caused that one. An even earlier discharge in 2016 caused by construction blockage led to a massive five-million-litre, 10-day-long raw sewage dump, enough to fill two Olympic-sized swimming pools, pouring sewage underneath the ice on the Red River right across from Elmwood’s Glenelm area. If you have any questions about other provincial programs, feel free to contact me at 204-415-1122 or email me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.ca

On July 22, there was a 44-minute discharge of an estimated 0.096 megaLitres of untreated sewage into the Red River at the Munroe pumping station. 

That’s 96,000 litres of raw sewage. This incident was caused by a water main break and contributed to the 12 billion litres of raw sewage that pours into the Red and Assiniboine annually, mainly because of large wet weather events that cause wastewater and sewage to overflow our combined drainage system.

The City of Winnipeg, in its 2022 budget process, is looking at raising its annual investment to reduce combined sewer overflows to $45 million from $30 million starting in 2023. It’s moving in this direction in response to a provincial directive to act on an agreed to target of an ‘85 per cent combined sewer overflow volume capture.’ 

Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2021

Supplied photo
Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway and Coun. Jason Schreyer (Elmwood-East Kildonan) at the Munroe Pumping Station.

Bill 64 is a bad idea at the worst time

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

Bill 64 is a bad idea at the worst time

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 7, 2021

Residents of northeast Winnipeg may be forgiven if they are experiencing déjà vu this summer. Lawn signs are again sprouting up in protest of another Pallister PC disaster. Last time we saw this, it was a two-year-plus campaign by local residents voicing their opposition to the planned elimination of Concordia Hospital’s emergency room. Thanks to the community’s visible opposition, the government backed off on its original proposal and we were able to maintain an Urgent Care emergency service. Not what we wanted, but better than the ‘nothing’ that was originally planned.This time, instead of eliminating our ER, the Progressive Conservative government’s Bill 64 will eliminate all school boards across the province and replace them with a centralized provincial education authority comprised of political appointees. It’s a power grab of the worst sort at the worst time.The centralized approach and the elimination of school boards was tried in New Brunswick by the Liberal government of Frank McKenna in the early 1990s, only to be rolled back in 1999 when, ironically enough, the PC government of Bernard Lordrealized what a mistake it was not to have an effective structure to govern public education. The community sign campaign in opposition to Bill 64 has been made possible because the NDP, as the official Opposition, used its limited legislative powers to delay the bill’s passage. The Pallister PCs still have time to come to their senses. Eliminating all democratically elected school boards and replacing them with a centralized politically appointed authority has nothing to do with enhancing our public education system. Its provisions are aimed at control, compliance, and standardization. Anyone concerned about this reckless bill should join the many other Manitobans who have already signed up to speak against Bill 64 at legislative committee this fall. Simply call the Legislative Clerk’s office at 204-945-3636 and tell them you would like to speak to Bill 64 at committee.☐ ☐ ☐On another note, it is great to see all the gardening happening.  Elmwood-East Kildonan city councillor Jason Schreyer and I were able to each contribute 20,000 packets of garden seeds to area residents and personally distribute them to our respective residents’ home mailboxes.If you have any questions about other provincial programs, feel free to contact me at 204-415-1122 or email me at Jim.Maloway@yourmanitoba.ca

Residents of northeast Winnipeg may be forgiven if they are experiencing déjà vu this summer. Lawn signs are again sprouting up in protest of another Pallister PC disaster. Last time we saw this, it was a two-year-plus campaign by local residents voicing their opposition to the planned elimination of Concordia Hospital’s emergency room. 

Thanks to the community’s visible opposition, the government backed off on its original proposal and we were able to maintain an Urgent Care emergency service. Not what we wanted, but better than the ‘nothing’ that was originally planned.

This time, instead of eliminating our ER, the Progressive Conservative government’s Bill 64 will eliminate all school boards across the province and replace them with a centralized provincial education authority comprised of political appointees. It’s a power grab of the worst sort at the worst time.

Wednesday, Jul. 7, 2021

Supplied photo
Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway (left) and Coun. Jason Schreyer (Elmwood-East Kildonan) checking out how Jim’s own garden seeds are coming along.

Elmwood residents oppose diagnostic lab closures

Jim Maloway 2 minute read Preview

Elmwood residents oppose diagnostic lab closures

Jim Maloway 2 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 9, 2021

Since my January MLA report to Elmwood residents on the diagnostic lab closures across the city, over 1,000 northeast Winnipeg residents have responded to my survey and/or signed my petition to voice their strong opposition to these closures.

Every day, more and more northeast Winnipeg residents are finding out the hard way that their usual diagnostic blood and fluid testing lab locations are closed. This is the result of the closure of 21 diagnostic lab locations, including Concordia Community Clinic’s Dynacare Lab, and a monopoly consolidation of services at four super-sites across the City.

The simple diagnostic blood tests and urine samples that used to be done when you visited your doctor’s office now require a separate visit to a reduced number of lab locations. Gone is the convenience and efficiency of walking a few feet with your lab requisition form to get your test done in the doctor’s office, a practice that made sense to doctors and patients.

We need to restore these diagnostic medical services, not make life easier for private blood lab companies.

Wednesday, Jun. 9, 2021

Supplied photo
Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway presented a petition on diagnostic testing accessibility to the Manitoba Legislature on April 27, 2021.

Replace lead water pipes

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

Replace lead water pipes

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Wednesday, May. 12, 2021

On April 29, U.S. President Joe Biden gave his first address to Congress. Early in his speech he identified lead water pipes as a “clear and present danger” to American public health and announced a 100 per cent replacement of lead water pipes found in 10 million U.S. homes and 400,000 schools and child-care centres as a major part of the America’s Job Plan, so that every American has safe drinking water.Here in Canada, all levels of government need to get serious about lead levels in our drinking water.In 2019, Health Canada announced new guidelines for lead exposure. Its findings were troubling. Lead concentrations in drinking water “should be kept as low as reasonably achievable as lead exposures are inherently unsafe and have serious health consequences,” especially for children and expectant mothers. Since those new guidelines were announced, many Canadian cities have taken steps to help homeowners replace lead water pipe connections from their basements to city property lines. Halifax, Calgary and others have launched rebate, loan, grant, and incentive programs for lead water pipe replacement costs that can run up to $4,000 per property. Winnipeg has not.Winnipeg has 23,000 homes with lead water pipe connections to the city’s main waterline. The Elmwood-East Kildonan area has 2,755 of these homes. If you live in a home built before 1950, chances are you have these lead water pipe connections to the main line. If you’re not sure what kind of water pipes you have, you can call the city at 311. Winnipeg has an inventory of homes and public buildings, including schools and daycares, that have lead water pipe connections, and they’ll provide property owners with the information.This is a health problem that requires decisive government action. The province needs to take the clear initiative and immediately contact all home and property owners in Manitoba with lead water pipes connected to main lines and provide full financial support for lead water pipe replacement so their access to safe water is assured and exposure to lead and its health risks are eliminated. If you have any questions about provincial programs, feel free to contact me at 204-415-1122 or email me at Jim.Maloway@yourmanitoba.ca

On April 29, U.S. President Joe Biden gave his first address to Congress. Early in his speech he identified lead water pipes as a “clear and present danger” to American public health and announced a 100 per cent replacement of lead water pipes found in 10 million U.S. homes and 400,000 schools and child-care centres as a major part of the America’s Job Plan, so that every American has safe drinking water.

Here in Canada, all levels of government need to get serious about lead levels in our drinking water.

In 2019, Health Canada announced new guidelines for lead exposure. Its findings were troubling. Lead concentrations in drinking water “should be kept as low as reasonably achievable as lead exposures are inherently unsafe and have serious health consequences,” especially for children and expectant mothers. 

Wednesday, May. 12, 2021

Supplied photo
Elmwood MLA Jim Malway, pictured here with Jason Schreyer, city councillor for Elmwood-East Kildonan, writes that it’s time for all levels of government to help homeowners replace lead water pipe connections to main water lines.

Action needed now to stop catalytic converter thefts

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

Action needed now to stop catalytic converter thefts

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Monday, Apr. 12, 2021

The North America-wide spike in catalytic converter thefts has hit Winnipeg. Organized groups of criminals are climbing under your parked vehicles and cutting out your catalytic converters and selling them to scrap metal dealers for cash, with no records kept.Catalytic converters are a part of your vehicle’s exhaust systems that convert pollutants to less toxic material. The spike in thefts is due to the huge increases in the price of the exotic metals in them. Precious metals like rhodium are valued at $19,000 per ounce. Palladium is worth $2,200 per ounce, and platinum is worth $1,300 per ounce. It’s no wonder scrap metal dealers will pay good money for these items. In fact, catalytic converters are priced to the vehicle and may be bought by scrap metal dealers for as low as $122.43 and as much as $800 for some larger ones.These thefts cost Manitobans about $2,000 for each catalytic converter replacement. MPI charges a ‘betterment fee’ for new replacements so your insurance won’t cover the full cost of replacement.The needed rules changes aren’t complicated. Sellers should have to provide government-issued photo ID and dealers must be required to record and retain this information for two years and must also record details of the transactions. Payments would have to made using traceable methods, such as electronic transfers or cheques.Scrap metal dealers would have to report all transactions involving commonly stolen metals, including copper, and items such as catalytic converters. All construction sites face a similar risk of metal theft. British Columbia has longstanding scrap metal legislation along these lines and Alberta passed new scrap metal laws last year. So when is Manitoba going to take action to prevent these thefts?The Winnipeg Police Service recently reported 77 thefts in January and, unless the province takes this issue seriously, many more Winnipeg drivers will be experiencing the shock of waking up the whole neighbourhood when they start their vehicles in the morning, with a noise that costs $2,000 to fix.If you have any questions or comments, please contact me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.ca or call my office at 204-415-1122. 

The North America-wide spike in catalytic converter thefts has hit Winnipeg. Organized groups of criminals are climbing under your parked vehicles and cutting out your catalytic converters and selling them to scrap metal dealers for cash, with no records kept.

Catalytic converters are a part of your vehicle’s exhaust systems that convert pollutants to less toxic material. The spike in thefts is due to the huge increases in the price of the exotic metals in them. 

Precious metals like rhodium are valued at $19,000 per ounce. Palladium is worth $2,200 per ounce, and platinum is worth $1,300 per ounce. It’s no wonder scrap metal dealers will pay good money for these items. In fact, catalytic converters are priced to the vehicle and may be bought by scrap metal dealers for as low as $122.43 and as much as $800 for some larger ones.

Monday, Apr. 12, 2021

Supplied photo
Jim with Dwight Rock, owner of Glenwood Motors on Hespeler Avenue at the Redwood Bridge. Criminals can efficiently cut off one pipe and be off with your catalytic converter in under five minutes.

Time to give consumers a level playing field

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

Time to give consumers a level playing field

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Sunday, Mar. 14, 2021

Europe’s right-to-repair laws are now in force, and Canadian legislators need to direct their attention to better protecting consumers from unnecessary additional expenses and more waste added to the environment.If you are like most Canadians, you’ve discarded or replaced a broken fridge, washer, or electronic device because of a reparable issue. Perhaps it was a prohibitively expensive part, or simply a design feature. You were forced to buy a new one because repairing the old item was just too expensive.Right to repair means small business repair shops will have access to the right training and the right tools, and a positive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) relationship, and consumers will benefit.Canada does have right-to-repair agreements in place for automobiles. That’s why you can take your car to a mechanic of your choice or fix it yourself.We need to do the same with devices big and small, keep them out of the landfills and create jobs in the repair sector.By legislating the right to repair Manitobans will be better able to repair their older appliances at reasonable cost.Some European industries already have right-to-repair laws apply to them. New rules there also require manufacturers of appliances, computers, TVs, and other plug-in electronics to build their products to last longer and to provide spare parts for their machines for up to 10 years.It won’t be easy here. Attempts to legislate these rights in Canada have been met with strong, well-funded industry opposition by groups representing Apple, Panasonic, John Deere, Samsung, Microsoft, and other big tech companies, just as they did in the U.S. Yet, in spite of this opposition by many manufacturers, at least 20 U.S. states have introduced or are debating right-to-repair legislation. Right here in Elmwood, small businesses such as Elmwood Appliances see the effects of a system now weighted against consumers and the environment in ways that can be corrected. You may have seen Ron and Anthony Theriault’s washing machine converted into a Zamboni on TV, in the news or on social media. Given the tools and resources, the repair business sector and small businesses can once again flourish, and our economy and environment will be the better for it.Feel free to contact me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.ca or call my office at 204-415-1122.

Europe’s right-to-repair laws are now in force, and Canadian legislators need to direct their attention to better protecting consumers from unnecessary additional expenses and more waste added to the environment.

If you are like most Canadians, you’ve discarded or replaced a broken fridge, washer, or electronic device because of a reparable issue. Perhaps it was a prohibitively expensive part, or simply a design feature. You were forced to buy a new one because repairing the old item was just too expensive.

Right to repair means small business repair shops will have access to the right training and the right tools, and a positive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) relationship, and consumers will benefit.

Sunday, Mar. 14, 2021

Supplied photo
Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway and city councillor Jason Schreyer (Elmwood-East Kildonan) pay a visit to Elmwood Appliances.

Proof of vaccination – the next step

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

Proof of vaccination – the next step

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Friday, Feb. 12, 2021

As more and more Manitobans are immunized against COVID-19, they will want proof of vaccination they can use when proof is required.Now is the time for to start thinking about this, as the issue raises important legal, ethical, and policy concerns. There must be clear rules about how such certificates will be given and regulated, and how they’ll be designed to protect individual privacy and security across the public and private sectors. They also need to be resistant to tampering and very difficult to counterfeit.Our responsibilities as citizens to protect each other should always guide our decision-making. Our public health authorities work diligently to ensure the health information and products they are provide us are safe. I encourage everyone who is able to take the vaccines to do so, to better protect those who are vulnerable. With those guiding principles in mind, there are many situations where government may require proof of vaccination, but nothing has yet been set in stone. One situation in which we can all imagine proof of vaccination being necessary is f air travel. Proof of vaccinations has always been a feature of modern travel, and it appears that  a global COVID-19 vaccine certification program and common international protocols may be developed. British Columbia has announced that it will offer people the option of a paper and/or digital copy of their immunization records and it has already developed an online portal for people to register to access their digital immunization records. The Pallister government needs to start getting organized now, so that as more doses of the vaccine arrive in our province Manitobans can quickly and efficiently access their proof of vaccination.We should expect the provincial government to consult Manitobans on the array of issues that now present themselves, just as they have asked for public input on the various public health restrictions and essential services designations. The province’s consultative web site is found at engagemb.ca and all Manitobans who have online access are encouraged to register and complete the surveys as they present themselves. Residents without online access can call the Manitoba government at 204-945-3744.If you have any questions about other provincial programs, feel free to contact me at 204-415-1122 or email me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.ca

As more and more Manitobans are immunized against COVID-19, they will want proof of vaccination they can use when proof is required.

Now is the time for to start thinking about this, as the issue raises important legal, ethical, and policy concerns. There must be clear rules about how such certificates will be given and regulated, and how they’ll be designed to protect individual privacy and security across the public and private sectors. They also need to be resistant to tampering and very difficult to counterfeit.

Our responsibilities as citizens to protect each other should always guide our decision-making. Our public health authorities work diligently to ensure the health information and products they are provide us are safe. I encourage everyone who is able to take the vaccines to do so, to better protect those who are vulnerable. 

Friday, Feb. 12, 2021

Supplied photo
Congratulations to the residents of Columbus Centennial Senior Housing Co-op on their riverbank mitigation project. Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway and Elmwood-East Kildonan councillor Jason Schreyer visited the construction site on Jan. 29.

Immunization program is a race against time

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

Immunization program is a race against time

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Friday, Jan. 15, 2021

Manitobans should be vaccinated against COVID-19 as quickly as possible, but instead the province’s vaccine rollout has been slow, chaotic, and glitchy. We had precious doses wasted and immunization centres closed for days in December. That’s a level of unpreparedness that Manitobans — particularly those most vulnerable — can’t afford.  COVID-19 is an enemy that doesn’t care about deadlines, so our government needs to get all Manitobans on the road to immunity as soon as new doses are available. Our rollout is slow because thousands of doses we’ve already received sit waiting in storage, rather than in the arms of Manitobans. Last month the Pallister government promised 40,000 vaccinations in January — but we are not on track to meet that goal. They’ve missed their own targets and now they are scaling down their promises. By early February, our front-line health workers and long-term care residents and staff will hopefully have at least one of their doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. Almost half of all of Manitoba’s 700-plus COVID-19 deaths have been long-term care residents, and I know many Elmwood residents will be much relieved to have vulnerable family members start building immunity. The second dose boosts the effects of the first dose and should ideally be administered 21 days after the first shot. Peak immunity is achieved for most people about seven days after the second dose. Manitoba’s vaccine plan is to have 9,834 residents in 135 long term personal care home sites fully vaccinated by mid-March. Manitoba’s roll-out to the general population will begin in earnest once specific groups, such as hospital ward workers, emergency workers and homecare workers, for example, have been vaccinated. The province will announce further information as details are finalized for the general population. For up-to-date information on Manitoba’s COVID immunization program, please visit https://manitoba.ca/covid19/vaccine/index.html and click on ‘Current Eligibility Criteria’ for further information. Those of you without access to the internet, feel free to give my office a call at 204-415-1122.One of the most critical tasks the Pallister government has as this immunization program rolls out is to ensure all Manitobans know when they are eligible to receive the vaccine. The vaccine is free and must be accessible to all families no matter their mobility, location, or income. My NDP colleagues and I will continue to advocate for a vaccine plan that is fast, effective and clearly communicated. For further information, feel free to contact my office at 204-415-1122 or email me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.ca

Manitobans should be vaccinated against COVID-19 as quickly as possible, but instead the province’s vaccine rollout has been slow, chaotic, and glitchy. 

We had precious doses wasted and immunization centres closed for days in December. That’s a level of unpreparedness that Manitobans — particularly those most vulnerable — can’t afford.  

COVID-19 is an enemy that doesn’t care about deadlines, so our government needs to get all Manitobans on the road to immunity as soon as new doses are available. Our rollout is slow because thousands of doses we’ve already received sit waiting in storage, rather than in the arms of Manitobans. Last month the Pallister government promised 40,000 vaccinations in January — but we are not on track to meet that goal. They’ve missed their own targets and now they are scaling down their promises. 

Friday, Jan. 15, 2021

Manitobans should be vaccinated against COVID-19 as quickly as possible, but instead the province’s vaccine rollout has been slow, chaotic, and glitchy. We had precious doses wasted and immunization centres closed for days in December. That’s a level of unpreparedness that Manitobans — particularly those most vulnerable — can’t afford.  COVID-19 is an enemy that doesn’t care about deadlines, so our government needs to get all Manitobans on the road to immunity as soon as new doses are available. Our rollout is slow because thousands of doses we’ve already received sit waiting in storage, rather than in the arms of Manitobans. Last month the Pallister government promised 40,000 vaccinations in January — but we are not on track to meet that goal. They’ve missed their own targets and now they are scaling down their promises. By early February, our front-line health workers and long-term care residents and staff will hopefully have at least one of their doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. Almost half of all of Manitoba’s 700-plus COVID-19 deaths have been long-term care residents, and I know many Elmwood residents will be much relieved to have vulnerable family members start building immunity. The second dose boosts the effects of the first dose and should ideally be administered 21 days after the first shot. Peak immunity is achieved for most people about seven days after the second dose. Manitoba’s vaccine plan is to have 9,834 residents in 135 long term personal care home sites fully vaccinated by mid-March. Manitoba’s roll-out to the general population will begin in earnest once specific groups, such as hospital ward workers, emergency workers and homecare workers, for example, have been vaccinated. The province will announce further information as details are finalized for the general population. For up-to-date information on Manitoba’s COVID immunization program, please visit https://manitoba.ca/covid19/vaccine/index.html and click on ‘Current Eligibility Criteria’ for further information. Those of you without access to the internet, feel free to give my office a call at 204-415-1122.One of the most critical tasks the Pallister government has as this immunization program rolls out is to ensure all Manitobans know when they are eligible to receive the vaccine. The vaccine is free and must be accessible to all families no matter their mobility, location, or income. My NDP colleagues and I will continue to advocate for a vaccine plan that is fast, effective and clearly communicated. For further information, feel free to contact my office at 204-415-1122 or email me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.ca

Manitobans should be vaccinated against COVID-19 as quickly as possible, but instead the province’s vaccine rollout has been slow, chaotic, and glitchy. 

We had precious doses wasted and immunization centres closed for days in December. That’s a level of unpreparedness that Manitobans — particularly those most vulnerable — can’t afford.  

COVID-19 is an enemy that doesn’t care about deadlines, so our government needs to get all Manitobans on the road to immunity as soon as new doses are available. Our rollout is slow because thousands of doses we’ve already received sit waiting in storage, rather than in the arms of Manitobans. Last month the Pallister government promised 40,000 vaccinations in January — but we are not on track to meet that goal. They’ve missed their own targets and now they are scaling down their promises. 

A code red holiday: Vaccines rolling out

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

A code red holiday: Vaccines rolling out

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Friday, Dec. 18, 2020

 

As 2020 draws to a close, we are in the midst of a code red public health emergency, and we are entering a festive season unlike any other we have experienced in our lifetimes.We are mindful of the many sacrifices others are making on our behalf and, indeed, the ones we are all making to better protect family, friends, and the wider community.COVID-19 isn’t taking a break during the holiday season, so we all must continue following the fundamentals of social distancing, handwashing, and masking up where required.In a democracy, robust debate is a healthy thing, and while we may disagree on details, it’s important for all of us to follow the public health directives. Our aim is to have all our family and friends around to celebrate together when it’s safe again to do so — and that’s around the corner.The good news for everyone is the vaccines have begun to roll. They are free and safe, approved by Health Canada, and they will be monitored stringently. This month, 249,000 doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine are to be delivered across Canada. Although it’s a small batch — enough to vaccinate 124,500 people in total given the two shots required — provincial governments have had to decide who gets the first shots. The first vaccines have been administered in Winnipeg, and nurses in the COVID-19 critical care units were among the first to receive the shots, followed by senior citizens in long-term care homes and assisted living facilities, including retirement homes and chronic care hospitals. They will be further followed by older adults starting at 80 years of age and older and adults at risk in remote or isolated Indigenous communities.In the medium term, Manitoba should receive enough to vaccinate more than 100,000 people by March 31 of next year at locations in Winnipeg, Brandon, Thompson, Steinbach, Gimli, Portage la Prairie and The Pas.Information about the vaccine clinics in the months ahead will be shared with Manitobans as more vaccine arrives in the province.Please have a safe, healthy, and happy holiday, and best wishes for a happy and healthy New Year.For more information on provincial programs, please contact my office at 204-415-1122 or email me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.ca 

As 2020 draws to a close, we are in the midst of a code red public health emergency, and we are entering a festive season unlike any other we have experienced in our lifetimes.

We are mindful of the many sacrifices others are making on our behalf and, indeed, the ones we are all making to better protect family, friends, and the wider community.

Friday, Dec. 18, 2020

Supplied
Coun. Jason Schreyer (Elmwood-East Kildonan) and Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway looking for Christmas trees.

Pandemic response must be refocused

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

Pandemic response must be refocused

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Friday, Nov. 20, 2020

Here we are. The expected second wave of COVID-19 has crashed upon Manitoba shores in earnest. It’s hard to believe we are in the situation we’re in after essentially escaping COVID-19 infections in the first wave.  Going forward, we now know we need a proper, updated inventory of personal protective equipment  so we don’t put our nurses, health care aides, doctors, homecare workers, teachers, students and seniors at greater risk than necessary. Chances are we’ll see another pandemic down the road. Today, health care workers are exhausted and working mandatory overtime to make up for staff shortages, rationing their supplies and re-using PPE. Hopefully, by the time you read this, our numbers will be much better.However, we can look back now and see the Pallister government didn’t focus enough on strengthening our health care and education systems and protecting our seniors. As of mid-November, we had the highest test-positivity rate in Canada and our hospitals’ intensive-care units were nearing full capacity. We need real leadership and a more proactive approach, especially on meaningful protections for long-term care residents in privately run personal care homes who have suffered disproportionately. British Columbia was able to do this. Why couldn’t we?It’s a tragic feature of this pandemic that one infected person can cause an outbreak. Manitoba’s chief public health officer, Dr. Brent Roussin recently reported a case of one infected person having 83 contacts.The government needs to refocus its pandemic response by fixing our long-term care home system by ending for-profit care homes in Manitoba and hiring more staff for more direct hours of care. We need more mandatory in-person inspections of these facilities, too; and we need quality PPE for all frontline workers. It’s never too late. We must move quickly on all these things because lives and livelihoods are at stake.If you have questions, please free to give me a call at 204-415-1122, or send me a note at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba.caI look forward to hearing from you.

Here we are. The expected second wave of COVID-19 has crashed upon Manitoba shores in earnest. 

It’s hard to believe we are in the situation we’re in after essentially escaping COVID-19 infections in the first wave.  Going forward, we now know we need a proper, updated inventory of personal protective equipment  so we don’t put our nurses, health care aides, doctors, homecare workers, teachers, students and seniors at greater risk than necessary. Chances are we’ll see another pandemic down the road. 

Today, health care workers are exhausted and working mandatory overtime to make up for staff shortages, rationing their supplies and re-using PPE. Hopefully, by the time you read this, our numbers will be much better.

Friday, Nov. 20, 2020

Supplied photo
Elmwood MLA and Elmwood-East Kildonan city councillor Jason Schreyer (left) privately paid their respects Prince Edward Legion Branch 81’s Centennial Park cenotaph on Raleigh Street on Remembrance Day.

Now more than ever — get your flu shot

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

Now more than ever — get your flu shot

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Friday, Oct. 23, 2020

It’s flu season. It’s starting now, and it’ll peak between December and February, losing steam by May. Even the usual flu season puts a severe strain on our health resources — 29 Manitobans died last season — so it’s especially important for all of us to do our part in minimizing the burden of respiratory illness on our health care system during this pandemic. Of course, it’s good for our own health in the vast majority of cases — but it’s important to check with your doctor if you have any concerns about the flu vaccine.The flu vaccine is generally available and so Manitobans should visit their physician’s offices, local pharmacies, Access Centres, local nursing stations or immunization clinics to get the free shot. For updated information on where to get the flu shots, please visit the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority website at: https://www.gov.mb.ca/health/flu/where.html#wrhaWhile the battle against COVID-19 has had its setbacks with real economic and social consequences, it’s important to remember that COVID vaccines are around the corner. As of mid-October, there were 44 vaccines in clinical trials on humans and over 92 preclinical vaccines under active investigation in animals. Although none yet are approved, five vaccines have been approved for early and limited use. Eleven vaccines are in Phase 3, large-scale efficacy tests, and dozens are in Phase 1 and Phase 2 trials. While many of these trials may fail, there is great promise that a few will do the job. And that’s all we’ll need to take the needed step in preventing infection. The COVID-19 vaccine won’t be a cure, of course, but the therapies today are light years ahead of where they were at the beginning of the pandemic and the survival rate has risen dramatically. But make no mistake about it, you don’t want this infection. There are too many unknowns, and its real consequences may include a lifetime of reduced respiratory function and other organ damage, and a lifetime of drug therapy. In our universal health care system this will mean we will all share the burden of these health costs and so we are in this together.If you have questions, please free to give me a call at 204-415-1122, or send me a note at Jim.Maloway@yourmanitoba.ca. I look forward to hearing from you.

It’s flu season. It’s starting now, and it’ll peak between December and February, losing steam by May. 

Even the usual flu season puts a severe strain on our health resources — 29 Manitobans died last season — so it’s especially important for all of us to do our part in minimizing the burden of respiratory illness on our health care system during this pandemic. Of course, it’s good for our own health in the vast majority of cases — but it’s important to check with your doctor if you have any concerns about the flu vaccine.

The flu vaccine is generally available and so Manitobans should visit their physician’s offices, local pharmacies, Access Centres, local nursing stations or immunization clinics to get the free shot. 

Friday, Oct. 23, 2020

It’s flu season. It’s starting now, and it’ll peak between December and February, losing steam by May. Even the usual flu season puts a severe strain on our health resources — 29 Manitobans died last season — so it’s especially important for all of us to do our part in minimizing the burden of respiratory illness on our health care system during this pandemic. Of course, it’s good for our own health in the vast majority of cases — but it’s important to check with your doctor if you have any concerns about the flu vaccine.The flu vaccine is generally available and so Manitobans should visit their physician’s offices, local pharmacies, Access Centres, local nursing stations or immunization clinics to get the free shot. For updated information on where to get the flu shots, please visit the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority website at: https://www.gov.mb.ca/health/flu/where.html#wrhaWhile the battle against COVID-19 has had its setbacks with real economic and social consequences, it’s important to remember that COVID vaccines are around the corner. As of mid-October, there were 44 vaccines in clinical trials on humans and over 92 preclinical vaccines under active investigation in animals. Although none yet are approved, five vaccines have been approved for early and limited use. Eleven vaccines are in Phase 3, large-scale efficacy tests, and dozens are in Phase 1 and Phase 2 trials. While many of these trials may fail, there is great promise that a few will do the job. And that’s all we’ll need to take the needed step in preventing infection. The COVID-19 vaccine won’t be a cure, of course, but the therapies today are light years ahead of where they were at the beginning of the pandemic and the survival rate has risen dramatically. But make no mistake about it, you don’t want this infection. There are too many unknowns, and its real consequences may include a lifetime of reduced respiratory function and other organ damage, and a lifetime of drug therapy. In our universal health care system this will mean we will all share the burden of these health costs and so we are in this together.If you have questions, please free to give me a call at 204-415-1122, or send me a note at Jim.Maloway@yourmanitoba.ca. I look forward to hearing from you.

It’s flu season. It’s starting now, and it’ll peak between December and February, losing steam by May. 

Even the usual flu season puts a severe strain on our health resources — 29 Manitobans died last season — so it’s especially important for all of us to do our part in minimizing the burden of respiratory illness on our health care system during this pandemic. Of course, it’s good for our own health in the vast majority of cases — but it’s important to check with your doctor if you have any concerns about the flu vaccine.

The flu vaccine is generally available and so Manitobans should visit their physician’s offices, local pharmacies, Access Centres, local nursing stations or immunization clinics to get the free shot. 

How do you feel about CancerCare changes?

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

How do you feel about CancerCare changes?

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Friday, Sep. 25, 2020

In early September, schools in Elmwood and across the province reopened after a five-month break caused by the COVID-19 public health emergency. The Education Minister recently announced additional supports and funding for schools, which is good news. We continue to urge that everyone follow the advice of Manitoba’s chief public health officer, Dr. Brent Roussin and continue practising the fundamentals. Wear a mask if you can’t physically distance and avoid closed-in or crowded spaces. The capping of class sizes in schools is also an important fundamental to social distancing, and the more easily schools and students can adhere to social distancing rules the better off we’ll all be. School openings are a key moment in the fight against the virus and we need to be vigilant. Teachers and school administrators are doing their best in a difficult situation and the community is certainly indebted to them.Earlier this month, we found out that CancerCare Manitoba’s outpatient services at Concordia Hospital and Seven Oaks General Hospital are scheduled to end in December. This is another reduction in health services for Concordia Hospital and northeast Winnipeg, and we want to hear from affected residents and their families.Elmwood residents have just gone through the experience of a government downgrade of our ER at Concordia Hospital. More recently, they have experienced the impact of private medical company Dynacare’s recent consolidation of 26 of its 53 diagnostic bloodwork labs into four “supersites”. Elmwood residents are lining up outdoors with other Winnipeggers for hours at these sites, many of them with serious health conditions. When the house resumes sitting again on Oct. 7, my colleagues and I look forward to continuing our advocacy on issues such as these that deeply affect all Manitobans.For more information, please feel free to contact me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba or call my office at 204-415-1122.

In early September, schools in Elmwood and across the province reopened after a five-month break caused by the COVID-19 public health emergency. The Education Minister recently announced additional supports and funding for schools, which is good news. 

We continue to urge that everyone follow the advice of Manitoba’s chief public health officer, Dr. Brent Roussin and continue practising the fundamentals. Wear a mask if you can’t physically distance and avoid closed-in or crowded spaces. 

The capping of class sizes in schools is also an important fundamental to social distancing, and the more easily schools and students can adhere to social distancing rules the better off we’ll all be. 

Friday, Sep. 25, 2020

In early September, schools in Elmwood and across the province reopened after a five-month break caused by the COVID-19 public health emergency. The Education Minister recently announced additional supports and funding for schools, which is good news. We continue to urge that everyone follow the advice of Manitoba’s chief public health officer, Dr. Brent Roussin and continue practising the fundamentals. Wear a mask if you can’t physically distance and avoid closed-in or crowded spaces. The capping of class sizes in schools is also an important fundamental to social distancing, and the more easily schools and students can adhere to social distancing rules the better off we’ll all be. School openings are a key moment in the fight against the virus and we need to be vigilant. Teachers and school administrators are doing their best in a difficult situation and the community is certainly indebted to them.Earlier this month, we found out that CancerCare Manitoba’s outpatient services at Concordia Hospital and Seven Oaks General Hospital are scheduled to end in December. This is another reduction in health services for Concordia Hospital and northeast Winnipeg, and we want to hear from affected residents and their families.Elmwood residents have just gone through the experience of a government downgrade of our ER at Concordia Hospital. More recently, they have experienced the impact of private medical company Dynacare’s recent consolidation of 26 of its 53 diagnostic bloodwork labs into four “supersites”. Elmwood residents are lining up outdoors with other Winnipeggers for hours at these sites, many of them with serious health conditions. When the house resumes sitting again on Oct. 7, my colleagues and I look forward to continuing our advocacy on issues such as these that deeply affect all Manitobans.For more information, please feel free to contact me at jim.maloway@yourmanitoba or call my office at 204-415-1122.

In early September, schools in Elmwood and across the province reopened after a five-month break caused by the COVID-19 public health emergency. The Education Minister recently announced additional supports and funding for schools, which is good news. 

We continue to urge that everyone follow the advice of Manitoba’s chief public health officer, Dr. Brent Roussin and continue practising the fundamentals. Wear a mask if you can’t physically distance and avoid closed-in or crowded spaces. 

The capping of class sizes in schools is also an important fundamental to social distancing, and the more easily schools and students can adhere to social distancing rules the better off we’ll all be. 

Class sizes must be capped for back-to-school plan

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 6 minute read Preview

Class sizes must be capped for back-to-school plan

Jim Maloway - Elmwood MLA Constituency Report 6 minute read Friday, Aug. 28, 2020

 

Opening our schools safely amid the public health emergency is a major concern for all Manitobans, in addition to parents, teachers and school support staff. There is emerging evidence children can be drivers of infection even when they are asymptomatic — which is a concern to all of us. 

And so, opening our schools is a major challenge. Our education system needs to have a better plan in place that will work to keep families safe. Recent announcements by the province meant to address the issue of safely opening our schools fall short of what is needed.

In the long term, we need to rethink how we build and manage classroom space and invest in personal protective equipment (PPE) for schools. We also need more investments in mental health, student supports, and in technology.

Friday, Aug. 28, 2020

 

Opening our schools safely amid the public health emergency is a major concern for all Manitobans, in addition to parents, teachers and school support staff. There is emerging evidence children can be drivers of infection even when they are asymptomatic — which is a concern to all of us. 

And so, opening our schools is a major challenge. Our education system needs to have a better plan in place that will work to keep families safe. Recent announcements by the province meant to address the issue of safely opening our schools fall short of what is needed.

In the long term, we need to rethink how we build and manage classroom space and invest in personal protective equipment (PPE) for schools. We also need more investments in mental health, student supports, and in technology.

Dealing with reopening is a balancing act

Jim Maloway 3 minute read Preview

Dealing with reopening is a balancing act

Jim Maloway 3 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020

As we move into the next phase of COVID-19 recovery, we can see that residents have had a meaningful say in our public health authority’s decisions.

The voice of every Manitoban matters, and we were thrilled to see Manitobans make their concerns known to this government about Phase 3, which in turn caused the government to hold off on some of its planned easing of restrictions.

For residents with specific concerns, it’s important to continue the dialogue by making your views known to our same health authorities. Online engagement for Manitobans continues at Engagemb.ca/phase-four-restoring-safe-services.

Those without access to the internet can certainly write to the proper health authorities directly. My office would be pleased to provide you with the appropriate contact information.

Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020

As we move into the next phase of COVID-19 recovery, we can see that residents have had a meaningful say in our public health authority’s decisions.

The voice of every Manitoban matters, and we were thrilled to see Manitobans make their concerns known to this government about Phase 3, which in turn caused the government to hold off on some of its planned easing of restrictions.

For residents with specific concerns, it’s important to continue the dialogue by making your views known to our same health authorities. Online engagement for Manitobans continues at Engagemb.ca/phase-four-restoring-safe-services.

Those without access to the internet can certainly write to the proper health authorities directly. My office would be pleased to provide you with the appropriate contact information.

Hold steady as we slowly reopen

Jim Maloway 2 minute read Preview

Hold steady as we slowly reopen

Jim Maloway 2 minute read Tuesday, Jul. 7, 2020

Although we can take a deep breath and enjoy the benefits of having done the things our public health officials have asked us to do, we must be ever mindful that COVID-19 continues to be a threat to public health. The last thing we want to do lose is our hard-won ground.

Manitobans know that we’ve been luckier than most. Although sacrifices have indeed been made, we’ve so far escaped the health risks of COVID-19  that too many others are experiencing.

To reach our health objectives, we may need much higher rates of COVID-19  testing as we reopen, and so it’s important for everyone who has a symptom to be tested. We also need to continue to build our inventory of personal protective equipment (PPE), including N-95 masks, for all our health-care workers, personal care home staff, and home care workers.

Our economic objective should be to keep jobs so we can recover quickly. Cutting public sector jobs at universitoes, colleges, community-based non-profits and in government services is the wrong prescription.

Tuesday, Jul. 7, 2020

Although we can take a deep breath and enjoy the benefits of having done the things our public health officials have asked us to do, we must be ever mindful that COVID-19 continues to be a threat to public health. The last thing we want to do lose is our hard-won ground.

Manitobans know that we’ve been luckier than most. Although sacrifices have indeed been made, we’ve so far escaped the health risks of COVID-19  that too many others are experiencing.

To reach our health objectives, we may need much higher rates of COVID-19  testing as we reopen, and so it’s important for everyone who has a symptom to be tested. We also need to continue to build our inventory of personal protective equipment (PPE), including N-95 masks, for all our health-care workers, personal care home staff, and home care workers.

Our economic objective should be to keep jobs so we can recover quickly. Cutting public sector jobs at universitoes, colleges, community-based non-profits and in government services is the wrong prescription.