John Hindle

John Hindle

Community Correspondent — St. Vital

John Hindle is a community correspondent for St. Vital. Email him at john@johnhindle.com

Recent articles of John Hindle

Have you been to a barn dance lately?

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Have you been to a barn dance lately?

John Hindle 3 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2022

I was recently asked by a friend to attend a barn dance to support a good cause…Urban Stable. I was not even sure what a barn dance was, but it sounded like fun, so I said “Sure!” And I’m glad I did.

Urban Stable is a registered charity that has been around for over 20 years. They use horses to connect with youth who may be facing obstacles and adversity. They do this through hands-on learning to help the young people achieve more confidence, patience and personal growth. The testimonials on their web site show how important this program can be.

I had heard of organizations using horses and other animals to connect with people. The animals chosen for these programs have a wonderful temperament and, in this case, the young people develop strong bonds with the horses.

The event was held at a stable near Stonewall in an indoor barn/arena. You brought your own lawn chair and sat on the sandy floor. Dinner included some great food catered by Danny’s Whole Hog BBQ & Smokehouse along with dessert from Dairy Queen. A wooden dance floor was erected in front of the band and there were people on the dance floor most of the night. The Dust Rhinos provided the entertainment and were a big hit.

Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2022

Photo by John Hindle

Urban Stable recently held a barn dance to raise funds for its program, which uses horses to interact with at-risk youth.

Overcoming challenges and fears

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Overcoming challenges and fears

John Hindle 3 minute read Friday, Sep. 9, 2022

I have written about my old friends from St. Vital a few times over the years but today I have a story to share about a new friend, Ryan Anderson.

I met Ryan at my Toastmasters Club. He is a fun-loving, outgoing guy who joined Toastmasters because he wanted to work on his public speaking skills. As he started to deliver speeches at the club and to tell us stories about his life’s journey, it was obvious that Ryan had lived some unique experiences that most of us could only imagine.

He described himself as an ultra-Endurance and adventure racer. Running a marathon was not enough of a challenge for Ryan. He participated in triathlons, which include swimming, biking, and running long distances. But that was not enough, so he progressed to ultra-marathons, cycling across Canada, and recently cycled for five weeks across 12 countries in Europe.

Ryan has participated in an event in Toronto where the participants ran up the steps of the CN Tower. I have taken the elevator to the CN tower observation deck, but climbing those stairs never really crossed my mind. Ryan climbed the stairs five times in the allotted time frame.

Friday, Sep. 9, 2022

Ryan Anderson celebrates after recently cycling from Istanbul, Turkey to the Cathedral de Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

A beach party for old St. Vitalers

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A beach party for old St. Vitalers

John Hindle 3 minute read Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022

A lot of people who grew up in St. Vital still live in the area, and many others maintain a strong connection. That was very evident at a reunion, of sorts, for those who grew up in St. Vital on the beach at Gimli on July 13.

Why Gimli, one might reasonably ask, and not St. Vital Park? Well, the organizers of the event happen to live in Gimli. Randy and Darlene (nee Olson) Bohemier, Jaye Feener (nee English) and Bill Buckels were the driving forces behind the party .Besides, Gimli is a lovely Manitoba town — and we were on a beach.

Word was spread through social media including the Facebook pages for local St. Vital schools. More than 60 people attended throughout the day. There would have been more, but the date was moved from July 1,2 owing to the threat of rain. I know others who were then unable to attend.

Some had attended Dakota Collegiate but there were many who attended Glenlawn and other St. Vital schools. With the date change, I was asked to transport someone I consider St. Vital royalty — former Dakota biology teacher and coach, Jerry Ilchyna. He and his humour played centre stage on the beach.

Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022

More than 60 people attended the St. Vital beach party in Gimli on July 13.

Winnipeg through the eyes of a tourist

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Winnipeg through the eyes of a tourist

John Hindle 3 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 22, 2022

I recently had the opportunity to remember why I love living in St. Vital. An old high school buddy, Bill Nash and his wife, Karen, came into town for a celebration of life and stayed with us. I acted as chauffeur and tour guide and listened to Bill’s memories of the St. Vital of our youth. I can’t print some of those memories but he had such fun recalling them. The stories were so vivid and no doubt get better with age.

Bill was really impressed by the state of St. Vital Park. He thought it was being well maintained and, having not seen it for many years, he noted the improvements. The “new” pavilion next to the duck pond… the updated toboggan slide… the entrance to the park, etc. He even told a story about camping at the Scout park which was amalgamated into St. Vital Park decades ago. It was fun to reminisce through fresh eyes.

We walked through the new gardens and paths west of the duck pond where my family bought a bench in memory of our mom and dad, who loved the park. I appreciate this new area and the connection to my family and so did my buddy. St. Vital Park holds a lot of memories for both of us. Family picnics were always fun. Just like yesteryear, the park is still filled with families enjoying the beauty and nature.

Winnipeg is blessed to have such amazing parks throughout the city. I will always treasure them.

Wednesday, Jun. 22, 2022

Bill Nash (left) and John Hindle pose on the St. Vital park bench that Hindle and his family paid for in memory of his parents.

High school buddies win national bridge title

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High school buddies win national bridge title

John Hindle 3 minute read Wednesday, May. 11, 2022

I learned how to play bridge when I was attending Dakota Collegiate. On weekends, we watched our school teams play on Friday nights and hung out with friends on Saturdays. One of our favourite activities was playing cards… namely, bridge. There is something about the game that is so appealing – the challenge, the probabilities, the social aspect.

Over the years, three of my high school friends and I have continued to play bridge together, usually on our annual “fishing” trips. Over the past two years, however, our bridge-playing really flourished online. A year ago, we decided to compete in this year’s Canadian Bridge Championships, which were to be held in Saskatoon but eventually became a virtual tournament, so for an entire year we played together online, practising and discussing our strategies. It was still fun and we were also improving.

Flight C of the Canadian National Team Championship was held over two long days. from morning into the evenings. We lost our first two games but kept playing better and better, edging ourselves into the playoff rounds in our last round-robin game. It was draining and challenging.

When all was said and done, after over a hundred hands and a lot of ups and downs, the computer announced our team – Dave West, Brian Macri, Jeff Gosman and myself — had won by one point! (One international match point, or IMP, in the scoring system we were using.)

Wednesday, May. 11, 2022

Pictured here on one of their “fishing” trips are the new CNTC-Flight C Canadian bridge champions (from left): John Hindle, Brian Macri, Jeff Gosman and Dave West.

Reflecting on simpler times

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Reflecting on simpler times

John Hindle 3 minute read Friday, Mar. 25, 2022

A Simpler Time

So how are you doing? Are times tough? You bet they are. One of the toughest years for weather in Winnipeg… this winter…two years of dealing with a pandemic…and now a war in Ukraine that threatens peace everywhere.

As I write this, I am looking out the window at huge snow banks. It reminds me of my childhood in St. Vital. Anyone remember the amount of snow in 1966 after the big storm in March? When I was a youngster (I mean actually young, not just feeling young-at-heart) many city roads were lined with ditches. As the snow melted, the ditches would fill with water and you could put a small twig or a match in the water and watch it float away. I recall placing two matches in the water and betting on which one would win a race. I would follow my match sticks for quite a distance, sometimes getting wet in the process. More than once I found my rubber boots filled with water. Mom was not too impressed but even that feels like a peaceful memory now.

We didn’t have to deal with a pandemic back then but my bout with mononucleosis was no fun. As pandemic restrictions loosen, here’s hoping the number of cases does not rise significantly. There is no doubt wearing masks helped slow the spread of the virus, as masks would with any respiratory ailment. With nicer weather we are outside more, so that could help.

Friday, Mar. 25, 2022

Correspondent John Hindle is pictured here as a four-year-old in 1956, fishing in his yard at St. David Road and Portland Avenue after the spring thaw.

Ironman curlers hurry hard on the Red River

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Ironman curlers hurry hard on the Red River

John Hindle 5 minute read Monday, Feb. 21, 2022

 

There is a fair bit of winter to deal with when you live in Winnipeg, and curling is one activity that can help fill those winter days. I don’t play anymore, but know people a lot older than me who still enjoy playing the game and I still enjoy watching curling on TV. I also recently enjoyed watching some outdoor curling at the Ironman outdoor curling event on the Red River here in Winnipeg on Feb. 4 and 5. Forty teams recently participated in the event, which has been held on the first full weekend in February for over 20 years. That is a lot of dedication from some special volunteers. Making curling ice on the river is not an easy feat and requires hours of preparation. If you have never heard of the event, mark down the weekend of Feb. 3 to 5, 2023. It’s worth a visit to see the curling sheets painted on the Red River, the bright lights at the evening draws, and the fun the curlers are having. The event also raises funds for two charities — namely the Heart and Stroke Foundation and Hope worldwide Canada.I may well owe my life to Heart and Stroke because, after my nasty heart attack, the clot-busting drug I was administered in the Kenora Hospital may well have saved my life. So, when Ironman Curling asked if I would help out with media and interviews, it was pretty easy to say “sure!” Funds are raised by the curlers paying an entry fee, garnering pledges, and from the public who support this unique event.  The event was honoured this year when Curling Canada shipped the Tankard trophy, symbol of supremacy in Canadian men’s curling, to Winnipeg to help celebrate Curling Day in Canada on Feb. 5. I had my picture taken alongside the historic trophy, which has several Manitoba names on it, and it brought some extra prestige to this year’s Ironman.Michael Thompson, a main organizer, curled in the first event and has volunteered ever since. When I asked him why, he said “Because we can! When you are involved with a successful event you believe in and are passionate about, you don’t count the number of years. You just keep going.”I salute all of the volunteers who make this event successful. You can still donate at www.ironmancurling.com or plan to enter a team next year. We should all find a way to support this uniquely wonderful Winnipeg event.John Hindle is a community correspondent for St. Vital. Email him at john@johnhindle.com 

There is a fair bit of winter to deal with when you live in Winnipeg, and curling is one activity that can help fill those winter days. I don’t play anymore, but know people a lot older than me who still enjoy playing the game and I still enjoy watching curling on TV. 

I also recently enjoyed watching some outdoor curling at the Ironman outdoor curling event on the Red River here in Winnipeg on Feb. 4 and 5. Forty teams recently participated in the event, which has been held on the first full weekend in February for over 20 years. That is a lot of dedication from some special volunteers. Making curling ice on the river is not an easy feat and requires hours of preparation. 

Monday, Feb. 21, 2022

Supplied photo
The Ironman outdoor curling bonspiel was held Feb. 4 and 5 on the Red River and correspondent John Hindle was able to get his photo with the Tankard trophy, which is presented annually to the Canadian men’s curling champion.

Looking back before looking ahead

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Looking back before looking ahead

John Hindle 5 minute read Sunday, Jan. 16, 2022

 

To start off 2022, I decided to update stories I have written recentl.I started by looking through the Facebook pages of Norberry School and Dakota Collegiate. What great memories! If you attended either school, you should take a peek. The Norberry page now has 525 members and Dakota has 420. Those totals have rocketed in the past year.Glenlawn Collegiate has a page as well and GCI will be celebrating 100 years on May 18 to 22, 2023. Surely, this pandemic will be over by then. In 1969-70, Dakota won the varsity girls and boys volleyball and basketball provincial championships. No school has ever done that before or since and I was in the stands cheering for every team. Hey, Bob Holliday, maybe that should be recognized at the St. Vital Museum?☐ ☐ ☐ Speaking of the Museum. I stopped in there the other day, and it’s looking good! A new coat of paint, a “new” 1924 fire truck, and the two-person horse drawn sleigh have all added to the charm. An annual individual membership costs just $20, so how about it?☐ ☐ ☐I wrote numerous articles about the St. Vital of my youth this past year, but the column on Delta Hardware received the most comments. Articles about the Horseshoe Inn, Roco Stations, Norberry Shoe Repair and  Murphy’s Drug Store all elicited responses from people with similar memories to mine. I also received emails from people who grew up in St. Vital closer to Glenlawn or St. Anne’s Road wrote to me about their favourite establishments. I had fun reading all of their stories. ☐ ☐ ☐I recently met with Paul Edmonds, the radio voice of the Winnipeg Jets. He and I worked together with the Winnipeg Goldeyes for years. It is rewarding to watch a good friend live out his dream as a broadcaster.Every time I hear him on the radio, I think...hey, I’ll spend a little time with Paul and listen to the game. He is a great broadcaster and a fun guy to be around. Speaking of broadcasters, I want to send out congratulations to one of the greats, Bob Irving. Many of us have spent pleasant times listening to his Bombers broadcasts over the years. Enjoy your well-deserved retirement, Bob. ☐ ☐ ☐Finally, my friend Jack Countryman is 86 years young and just celebrated his birthday by walking six miles on the streets of Winnipeg. Jack, my recent book about his life is available through me or at McNally Robinson. Jack is still creative and just launched some YouTube videos at Jack Countryman 25th Century. He still amazes me. ☐ ☐ ☐It was another crazy year. Here’s hoping 2022 brings us some peace and normalcy!John Hindle is a community correspondent for St. Vital. Email him at john@johnhindle.com 

To start off 2022, I decided to update stories I have written recently.

I started by looking through the Facebook pages of Norberry School and Dakota Collegiate. 

Sunday, Jan. 16, 2022

Supplied photo
Players and coaches of Dakota Collegiate's varsity boys and girls basketball and volleyball teams, which won all four provincial championships in the 1969-70 school year, pose with all their trophies. No school had ever done it previously and none has done it since.

The magic of Christmas memories

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The magic of Christmas memories

John Hindle 3 minute read Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2021

The Christmas season is upon us and I hope you all find some joy and peace to nourish. At this time of year, I sometimes reflect on pleasant memories of years long ago.

Cutting down the tree

When I was young, cutting down the Christmas tree was an all-day event. We packed into the car and drove east of Winnipeg, paid our 25 cents at the designated area in Sandilands Provincial Forest, and traipsed into the bush with dad’s axe to figure out which top of one of the tall trees would look best in our living room.

Some years the tree was not perfect. OK, some years it was downright comical. But it smelled fabulous and always looked beautiful once the lights and decorations were adorning it. On occasion, I know Dad drilled holes in the tree trunk where he placed branches to make the tree look fuller.

Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2021

Photo supplied by John Hindle
John Hindle is pictured here in 1956, at four years of age, sitting on Santa’s lap at Eaton’s downtown with his sister, Val.

November is a time to remember

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November is a time to remember

John Hindle 3 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2021

We are living through a pandemicm which has not been fun for anyone. But does that compare to living through a world war and having food rationed, as happened in the 1940s?

In both situations, a lot of people have lost their lives, been ill, injured and inconvenienced. I respect all of our health-care workers fighting on the front lines against COVID-19. In November, we honour all those who served in the Canadian armed forces to protect our way of life.

Remembrance Day is personal to me. Let me tell you why.

The turning point of the Second World War was D-Day — June 6, 1944. Two million men were stationed in England, waiting for that day and over 130,000 of them boarded 5,000 ships to depart for France. My dad, Gar Hindle, a longtime St. Vital resident, was on one of those ships.

Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2021

Supplied photo
A flag flies on a Winnipeg home in remembrance of Canadian war heroes.

Early childhood educators so very important

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Early childhood educators so very important

John Hindle 3 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021

Prior to 1990, Loraine Purdy operated a small nursery school program out of her home. Then her children headed off to school and a neighbour asked if she wanted to work at a new nursery school opening at Dakota Community Centre.

Lorraine said “sure.” That was 31 years ago and she just retired this September.

For the first eight years, the nursery school at Dakota operated as a private entity but since 1998 it has been operated by the community centre and Lorraine was the director until her retirement.

Each year, the program handled approximately 60 children aged three and four. Over 31 years, Loraine connected with a lot of kids, mostly from St. Vital.

Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021

Supplied photo
Loraine Purdy recently retired as director of the nursery school at Dakota Community Centre after 31 years.

Retired biology teacher now a tomato-whisperer

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Retired biology teacher now a tomato-whisperer

John Hindle 3 minute read Monday, Sep. 27, 2021

Jerry Ilchyna is well-known in St. Vital, as he was a biology teacher for many years at Dakota Collegiate.

Jerry grew up on a farm near Anola, Man., where he used to work in the fields when he was a young boy, and he still likes working the fields. Every year, Jerry drives multiple times to the family farm and tends to the vegetables he has planted. I have been the fortunate recipient of some of those vegetables.

What struck me this spring when Jerry asked me if I would like any tomato plants was how many different varieties he grew. It turns out he grows 16 varieties of heritage tomatoes and a few hybrids. One of the hybrids is called tigerella, so named because the tomatoes have some stripes in them.

Decades ago, a fellow Dakota teacher, Doug Wright (who taught me mathematics) gave Jerry all of the varieties his mother brought with her from the Ukraine when they immigrated to Canada. Jerry has diligently maintained the different types of tomatoes ever since.

Monday, Sep. 27, 2021

Photo by John Hindle
Jerry Ilchyna may no longer teach biology to high school students, but his friends are still learning plenty about to how grow tomatoes

There’s nothing like the local hardware store

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There’s nothing like the local hardware store

John Hindle 3 minute read Wednesday, Sep. 15, 2021

I want to thank Jim and Bill Head who recently sent emails. Their parents, George and Isabel, ran Delta Hardware at 980 St. Mary’s Road from 1960 to 1986.  

It was initially called Delta Hardware and Electric but when the Heads began operations it became Delta Hardware & Appliances, as they sold refrigerators, washers, dryers, televisions and more. They also operated a television repair division and bought a 1961 Chevy truck, which George treasured. One of the last pictures ever taken of George was in 2011 beside this refinished truck.

The business evolved through the years, as the neighbourhood and economy changed but, as with any successful small business, the store prided itself in providing personal service that was not available elsewhere.

They built strong relationships with customers from the neighbourhood and were known for their expertise in cutting keys, repairing windows, sharpening saws and skates, and tinting paint just to name a few.  If someone wanted advice, they would often come in to see George.

Wednesday, Sep. 15, 2021

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Delta Hardware was located at 980 St. Mary's Rd. and was a source of many memories for locals who frequented the store.

Help preserve the Belgian Veterans memorial

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Help preserve the Belgian Veterans memorial

John Hindle 3 minute read Thursday, Jul. 29, 2021

I wrote last month about my memories of playing baseball at Provencher Park. That article prompted a response from a reader who asked if I would consider an article about The Belgian Veterans Association Historical War Memorial on Provencher Boulevard, which is located on the strip of land between the lanes of traffic.  

If you are anything like me, you have driven past this memorial countless times but don’t know its history.

The memorial was designed and sculpted by a local artist, Hubert A. Garnier, in 1938, who used stone from the quarry in Haddington Island, B.C.

Garnier, a St. Vital resident, became very well-known as a sculptor and his work can be seen across Canada and the U.S.A. at such locations as the former Hudson’s Bay Store on Portage Avenue, Hotel Vancouver, and the Rockefeller Centre in New York City.

Thursday, Jul. 29, 2021

Photo by John Hindle
The Belgian Veterans Association Historical War Memorial on Provencher is in need of renovation and the Belgian Club is raising funds for the project.

Remembering the boys of summer

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Remembering the boys of summer

John Hindle 3 minute read Thursday, Jul. 1, 2021

I drove past Provencher Park the other day and stopped and got out of my car. It is so noticeable to me that teams are not using the baseball diamonds around town. Provencher is still used for baseball in a normal year for bantam players (aged 14 and 15).

The memories were thick as I walked around and reminisced about games I played there. The St. Boniface Legionaires junior team and the St. Boniface Native Sons senior team both called Provencher Park home. I played for both. We won a provincial championship with the junior team in 1973. Whittier Park, where they play now, did not exist back then.

I feel blessed that I am still friends with teammates I played with from that 1973 team and maybe I was a little nostalgic since losing my outfield partner and long-time friend, Barry Wiebe, a few months ago to brain cancer, and even more recently another great teammate, Clarke Single who was a big strong hitter with a wonderful laugh. Clarke succumbed to another nasty form of brain cancer called glioblastoma.

Barry played centre field and I played left. There is a lot of territory to cover at Provencher Park but, as I remember it, we covered it like a blanket. Of course, that was a long time ago so my memory may have some gaps.

Thursday, Jul. 1, 2021

Photo supplied by John Hindle
The 1973 St. Boniface Legionaires junior team won the provincial championship. Pictured are: (back row, from left) Don McCauley, manager); Denis Saurette, statistician; Jim Devouno, coach; Hank Lemoine; Clarke Single; (third row) Dave Henry; Jason Robinson; John Melnick; Ray Smith; Doug Freeth; Barry Dupre; (second row) Barry Wiebe; Jack Scott; Roger Saurette; Jim Foubister; Steve Hilton; (front row) Wilf Smith, batboy; John Hindle; Dave Roberts; Norm Saurette; Steve Gadient, coach; Brent Harrison, batboy.

A profile of a fascinating man

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A profile of a fascinating man

John Hindle 3 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 2, 2021

First, I’d like to say thank you to the readers who pointed out that the picture used in last month’s article (The Lance, May 5) was not described accurately.

The photo of the flood in 1950 actually depicted the corner of St. Vital Road and St. Mary’s Road. I was going to blame the editors until I realized it was me who made the mistake. (Editor’s note: It’s not always us, John!)

Sorry about that, and thanks to Lindsay Nowosad for sending me that picture. It still amazes me to see that amount of water on St. Mary’s Road.

As you know, I enjoy getting emails from readers in response to my articles. I recently, I received one from Sharon Beggs-Lawrence, who also grew up in St. Vital.

Wednesday, Jun. 2, 2021

Supplied image
St. Vital correspondent John Hindle has published a new book called Jack: The Life, Adventures and Observations of Jack Countryman...

No Black Friday, flood of the century this year

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No Black Friday, flood of the century this year

John Hindle 3 minute read Wednesday, May. 5, 2021

May 5, 1950 was so memorable in Winnipeg it was named Black Friday, long before we associated that term with great shopping.

That day, 71 years ago, marked the peak of the 1950 flood, when Red River rose over 30 feet above normal levels, forcing 100,000 people to be evacuated from their homes. A significant part of St. Vital was under water. The St. Vital Museum has a nice display depicting the flood.

Many of us remember 1997, when the Red River also peaked very close to this date in what was later called The Flood of the Century. In terms of the amount of water discharged by the Red River, it was the largest flood since 1826, and flooded river basin south of Winnipeg was renamed the Red Sea. I remember bringing the Winnipeg Goldeyes staff to help sandbag on Kingston Crescent that year. It does not appear like we have to worry about a flood this year!

☐ ☐ ☐

Wednesday, May. 5, 2021

Photo courtesy of Lindsay Nowosa
This is how the junction of St. Mary’s and St. Vital roads looked on May 5, 1950, during that year’s massive Red River flood. The day became known as Black Friday.

Do you remember Roco gas stations?

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Do you remember Roco gas stations?

John Hindle 3 minute read Monday, Apr. 5, 2021

Readers continue to email me their memories and many are posting on the Norberry School Facebook page, which now has over 400 members. Lots of fun...  

A few questions and recollections have tested my memory, so I have had to ask for help on occasion from my elders. Yes, my brother, Garry, is older than me, even if he has not admitted it for 30 years.

One reader asked what the name of the grocery store was at the junction of St. Anne’s Road and St. Mary’s Road?

It had underground parking which was so cool back then. The answer is …Safeway. The building later became CKND television studios.

Monday, Apr. 5, 2021

Mike Deal/Winnipeg Free Press
A Roco gas station sign sits in the middle of memorabilia set for auction in 2013.

The memories keep flooding back

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The memories keep flooding back

John Hindle 3 minute read Wednesday, Mar. 10, 2021

Last month’s article generated the most responses I have had in my five years writing for The Lance. That small section of St. Mary’s Road south of Norberry School (current school division offices) sure holds a lot of memories for people.

One of the interesting emails I received was from Lindsay Nawosad. Her parents, Joan and Nick, owned Norberry Shoe Repair from 1945 to 1986. The shop is still in business and I have been in it on numerous occasions. In the ’60s, my brother purchased a pair of blue shoes there. Yes…blue. Those were the days.

Lindsay writes: “In the winter, we sold hockey sticks, tape, white leather moccasins, boots and shoe polish, along with the skate sharpening. The skate exchange for new and reconditioned skates was also popular. One of my jobs, which I really liked, was repainting the used skates to get them ready for resale.”

The Nawosads were best friends with Lillian and Trevor John, who operated the Horseshoe Inn. Based on the emails I received, I was not the only person to play pinball at the Horseshoe Inn. Lindsay waitressed there after school and remembered the machines, as they were quite noisy. Trevor was always getting after the boys to stop tilting the machine.

Wednesday, Mar. 10, 2021

Supplied photo
This old photo of Norberry Shoe Repair was supplied by Lindsay Nawosad, whose parents ran the business from 1945 to 1986.

Shared memories of St. Vital childhood

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Shared memories of St. Vital childhood

John Hindle 3 minute read Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021

I grew up in St. Vital when Bishop Grandin Boulevard and St. Vital Centre were just visions of the future. The cornerstones of commerce in those days were St. Mary’s and St. Anne’s Roads.

Jim Hamilton wrote me recently. He’s a name from my past whom I remember as a good athlete.

“I just wanted to let you now how much I look forward to your column in The Lance,” he wrote.

“I find myself reflecting often on growing up on Poplarwood — roaming the streets on foot and bike; walking to St. George School and home each day for lunch — lots of steps.

Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021

Supplied photo
Hawk Patrol of the 100th Scout Troop sets up camp in what is now part of St. Vital Park. (From left) Len Murphy, Garry Hindle, Bob Waddell, and Roger Coll.

All we need is love… in a jar

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All we need is love… in a jar

John Hindle 3 minute read Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021

Who could have imagined what we have lived through this past year and through the recent holiday season? With so many people feeling isolated and alone, it is more important than ever that we stay connected.

How have you done staying connected with friends and acquaintances?

What I realized this past year, more than ever, is how powerful it can be to reach out to someone. I have always been a big believer in doing that. As a matter of fact, one of the books I have written is titled Making Contact: How to Connect with People.

As I was thinking about the people who have touched my life, I recalled two powerful memories.

Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021

Photo by John Hindle
This going-away present from former colleagues is a reminder of what’s important in life to correspondent John Hindle.

Saying farewell to 2020 and creating new memories

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Saying farewell to 2020 and creating new memories

John Hindle 3 minute read Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020

No doubt many of us will be glad to see 2020 in the rear-view mirror but, regardless of the challenges we all face, we can still find ways to have some fun.

My daughter, Allyson, is unable to come home for Christmas due to the pandemic, which is sad. However, we are trying to still make the season special.

Red Lobster is a favourite as it brings back fond memories of family vacations and good times over the years. I recently arranged curbside pickup at the Winnipeg location and also at one near her home in the United States and we enjoyed a video visit as we ate. It was different than other visits, as we had something unique to talk about … the different types of food we had ordered and some of our favourite Red Lobster memories. I expect a lot of people will be sharing online dinners this season.

Then we received a box filled with a homemade Advent calendar. Twenty-four small bags tied together with presents for each day in December before Christmas Day. The amount of work she put into this astonishes me, and it has brought a daily shot in the arm to think of her and how she cared enough to do something like this.

Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020

Photo by John Hindle
The homemade Advent calendar created by John Hindle’s daughter Allyson now hangs in his St. Vital home.

Show respect to others; it will be remembered

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Show respect to others; it will be remembered

John Hindle 3 minute read Monday, Nov. 16, 2020

The month of November is a time to remember. (Surely, I did not invent that rhyme.) This month, I do think more often of my mom, who served overseas in the Second World War with the Canadian Red Cross Corps, and especially my dad, who landed in the first wave of the D-Day invasion forces and fortunately returned home to have a full and rewarding life in St. Vital.

Recently, I walked down the street where I grew up…Portland Avenue. I don’t live in the past but I do cherish the memories of my youth. When regular life was curtailed near the start of the pandemic, I started writing about my childhood experiences and I could not stop. What fun to reminisce of times that were significant enough that I remember them decades later.

It caused me to wonder why we remember certain people and events.

Remembrance Day, of course, is a day chosen to do that specifically which I do, along with many others.

Monday, Nov. 16, 2020

Supplied photo courtesy of John Hindle
A very young John Hindle is pictured here ‘helping’ his parents move into their Portland Avenue home.

Working with a fellow Lance contributor

John Hindle 2 minute read Preview

Working with a fellow Lance contributor

John Hindle 2 minute read Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020

I love talking to St. Vital residents who have lived here for a long time. Their stories of life in our past are fascinating.

I have been fortunate enough to meet and write articles about people such as 94-year-old Tom Nicholl, who lived has lived on Dunraven Avenue for 71 years; Dave Cullen who lived on Glen Avenue and lived to be 100; and Lola Zeemel (nee Groff) who grew up in the house at the end of West Fernwood; to name just a few.

I recently ran across some very interesting information from another senior — my friend Jack Countryman, who can still be seen at the age of 85 walking the streets of St. Vital and Fort Garry as he has done for decades.

Jack asked if I would collaborate on a book with him. I agreed and, during the process, I learned a lot more about him, his philosophies and the interesting life he has led.

Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020

Supplied image
This cartoon by Jack Countryman ran on the editorial page of The Lance on Feb. 18, 1954. The editor had asked for a cartoon illustrating that $1,500 was not enough to control the Winnipeg mosquito population.