Kevin Lamoureux

Kevin Lamoureux

Winnipeg North constituency report

Kevin Lamoureux is the Liberal Member of Parliament for Winnipeg North.

Recent articles of Kevin Lamoureux

Feds make big Transit investment

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Feds make big Transit investment

Kevin Lamoureux 3 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 20, 2022

In Manitoba, the Government of Canada has invested more than $945 million in over 229 infrastructure projects since 2015. From contributing to community splash pads to mega-projects such as supporting Winnipeg Transit, when the different levels of government come together on infrastructure, we can really make a difference.

Earlier this month I joined with Premier Stefanson and Mayor Bowman to make a half billion-dollar commitment to Winnipeg Public Transit, of which over $200 million will be coming from the federal government.

At the announcement, I said “Winnipeg is a fast-growing, thriving city. If we want to continue welcoming more residents in a sustainable fashion, we need a public transit system that is reliable, accessible, and user-friendly. This federal funding will go a long way towards achieving those objectives by adding dozens of buses, many of them electric, on Winnipeg’s roads, and improving the transit system’s technology. The investments we’re making in transit will help connect Winnipeggers to work to school and to each other while creating jobs and reducing emissions.”

Some $110 million of federal funding will help electrify Winnipeg Transit’s bus fleet with the purchase of approximately 100 electric battery and electric fuel-cell buses and related infrastructure. An additional 135 diesel buses will be added to Transit’s fleet to meet the needs of a growing transit system.

Wednesday, Jul. 20, 2022

Mayor Brian Bowman (left), Winnipeg South MP Terry Duguid, Manitoba Premier Heather Stefanson, and Winnipeg North MP Kevin Lamoureux check out a bus after a transit funding announcement in Winnipeg on July 7.

New Philippines agreement is good for Canada

Kevin Lamoureux 2 minute read Preview

New Philippines agreement is good for Canada

Kevin Lamoureux 2 minute read Wednesday, May. 18, 2022

Did you know that the number of Canadians of Filipino heritage is now over one million people? And that Winnipeg North is arguably the heart of the Canadian Filipino community?

Canada’s diversity is one of the reasons we have the ability to build strong relationships with many countries around the world. Last month we saw a good example of how our relationship with the Philippines continues to grow. Canada’s international trade minister, Mary Ng and Ramon Lopez, the secretary of trade and industry from the Philippines witnessed the signing of a memorandum of understanding to establish a joint economic commission between Canada and Philippines.

The new JEC signifies another important step in deepening trade relations between Canada and the Philippines, which will build stronger economic linkages in the Indo-Pacific area. Minister Ng said the JEC will improve dialogue and collaboration on shared and emerging economic, investment and trade priorities— including in growth sectors such as renewable energies, infrastructure, agriculture, sustainable mining, and information and communications technology. The JEC allows for the participation of stakeholders, which will assist in making sure the interests of businesses and workers are well represented.

This development demonstrates the Government of Canada’s commitment to diversifying trade and economic partnerships across the Indo-Pacific region, which will result in creating more opportunities for Canadian businesses to export their innovative products and services, which means more jobs for people here in Canada.

Wednesday, May. 18, 2022

Winnipeg North MP Kevin Lamoureux is pictured at the monument to José Rizal, who inspired the Phillipines Revolution, on Keewatin Street.

Support for Ukraine is unwavering

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Support for Ukraine is unwavering

Kevin Lamoureux 3 minute read Wednesday, Mar. 23, 2022

On Dec. 2, 1991, Canada became the first western country in the world to recognize Ukraine’s independence and since then the two countries have had a very special relationship.

In 2014, a pro-Russian president of Ukraine and other elected parliamentarians tried, but failed, to weaken Ukraine’s ties to the west in favor of strengthening ties to Russia through trade agreements. Canada supported Ukraine in the aftermath with military training and other forms of aid. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s first signed international trade agreement was with Ukraine in 2016.

I visited the Maidan (Independence Square) in Kyiv in 2014 and saw first-hand how the people of Ukraine wanted freedom, democracy and individual rights. In my opinion, Russian president Vladimir Putin played a critical role back then and now he is showing the world how cruel a human being can be. The horrors of war are many, and what Putin is doing today in Ukraine is evil.

Back on Feb. 24, Putin authorized a full-scale military invasion of Ukraine. The war in Ukraine today is the greatest threat to world order since the Second World War. National sovereignty and territorial integrity allows people in democracies around the globe to live free and without fear. Canada has no option, as we must support a rules-based international order as we work with other allied countries in support of Ukraine. We all need to recognize that the attack on Ukraine is an attack on democracies around the world.

Wednesday, Mar. 23, 2022

Winnipeg North MP Kevin Lamoureux visited Kyiv, Ukraine, in 2014.

Thanking immigrant health-care workers

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Thanking immigrant health-care workers

Kevin Lamoureux 3 minute read Friday, Feb. 4, 2022

Canada’s health-care system requires immigrants in order to meet health-care service needs.

Immigration policy over the years has enabled Canadians to experience high-level quality care and health-care services. The reality is there are thousands of immigrants from around the world who were educated and/or worked in health care abroad before they became Canadian residents. Today still hundreds of them that are trying to get their skills fully recognized — but that is for another story.

On Jan. 24, the front page of the Winnipeg Free Press featured a Filipina immigrant working as a registered nurse here in Canada. As I read more about her, I was struck by this line: “Registered nurse April Intertas began nursing in her homeland, the Philippines, and is one of many Filipinas and Filipinos caring for patients in Manitoba hospitals.”

First off, let me express my appreciation and gratitude to April for choosing Winnipeg as her new home and for continuing in her passion for providing care. Canada has been blessed by so many health-care workers and caregivers coming her from the Philippines. April’s story reminded me of a 2016 report from Statistics Canada that estimated that internationally educated Filipino nurses are the largest groups of immigrant nurses in Canada and the United States.

Friday, Feb. 4, 2022

Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press Archives
April Intertas moved to Manitoba from the Philippines to be a nurse and has worked in HSC’s COVID-19 red zone during the pandemic.

Registered nurse April Intertas poses for a portrait in her home in Winnipeg on Thursday, Jan. 20, 2022. She moved to Manitoba from the Philippines to be a nurse here, and has worked in HSC's COVID red zone during the pandemic. For Chris Kitching story.

Winnipeg Free Press 2022.

Building our capacity to develop EVs

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Building our capacity to develop EVs

Kevin Lamoureux 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Winnipeg’s taxi industry was well ahead of everyone else, in my opinion, when it came to transitioning from gas vehicles to electric vehicles. 

Well over 10 years ago taxi owners all over the world, and here in Winnipeg, were purchasing hybrids such as the Toyota Prius whereas the population as a whole was holding back, primarily due to the cost of hybrid vehicles. In Manitoba, we have seen both federal and provincial governments create programs to encourage consumers to purchase electric and hybrid vehicles. I suspect that will continue but it is consumer demand accompanied by a higher sense of environmental awareness that will ultimately make such vehicles more affordable.

Aside from fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, the world is also facing the threat of man-made climate change. The amount of greenhouse gases generated worldwide is affecting our climate, creating destructive weather events such as the ‘atmospheric river’ that caused catastrophic flooding and infrastructure damage in British Columbia. Considering all this, the federal government has strived to cut pollution from all sectors of the economy — including the transportation sector, which is one of the largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada. Almost half these emissions come from cars and light trucks.

One way to reduce the amount of transportation-related GHG emissions is to put more electric vehicles on the road. Since 2015, the federal government has invested a historic $1 billion to make EVs more affordable and accessible for Canadians. These investments are building a coast-to-coast network of fast chargers, installing chargers in local areas where Canadians live, work and play, and providing rebates of up to $5,000 to help more Canadians buy EVs.

Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Dreamstime.com
Supplied photo
The Toyota Prius hybrid, such as this one in Paris, has been the workhorse vehicle of taxi fleets all over the world.

Potato Corner opens first Winnipeg franchise

Kevin Lamoureux 4 minute read Preview

Potato Corner opens first Winnipeg franchise

Kevin Lamoureux 4 minute read Friday, Nov. 19, 2021

Have you ever heard of a restaurant/fast food outlet called Potato Corner?

Chances are you have not but, if you immigrated from the Philippines in the last 20 years, there is a good chance that you are familiar with Potato Corner, which is renowned for its flavoured French fries. 

Back on Nov. 14, I participated in a ribbon-cutting at the grand opening of the first Potato Corner franchise in Manitoba, located in St. Vital Centre.

I was grateful for the invitation and congratulate the franchisees on the launch. Whenever small businesses open in the city, I consider it special because they form the backbone of the Canadian economy. They are what generate jobs.

Friday, Nov. 19, 2021

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Winnipeg North MP Kevin Lamoureux (back row, third from right) attended the grand opening of the Potato Corner franchise in St. Vital Centre on Nov. 14, where he was joined by Waverley MLA Jon Reyes (back centre), franchisee Nelson Rodriguez (left of Lamoureux), Philippines consul general Orontes Castro (back row, second from right) and honorary consul Ronaldo Opina (back row, far right).

Celebrating Canada’s many heritages

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

Celebrating Canada’s many heritages

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Tuesday, Jun. 8, 2021

Over the years I have often talked about how Canada’s diversity is what gives us our strength and recognition from around the world as a strong, healthy, modern nation.

Canada is often listed as the best country in the world to call home as we welcome hundreds of thousands of people every year.

Our heritage is enriched and continues to grow as it recognizes and adopts the contributions to our social, economic, political, and cultural life of Canadians who arrive here from all over the world.

A number of Canadian ethnic communities celebrate their heritage in the month of June, and the month has been so designated by Parliament for many of them.

Tuesday, Jun. 8, 2021

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Liberal MP Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg North) celebrated the beginning of Filipino Heritage Month on June 1 with a Facebook Live presentation.

Budget 2021 will help people to buy, renovate homes

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

Budget 2021 will help people to buy, renovate homes

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Thursday, May. 13, 2021

The 2021 federal budget was announced last month. This huge document does more than just lay out the plans for government finances over the next year, it’s really a road map to Canada’s economic recovery as governments of all levels will need to work together and focus on the new normal and building back better.

The No. 1 priority remains supporting Canadians through the COVID-19 pandemic and to that end we continue with supports for businesses and workers such the wage subsidy program and CERB, which have been extended until the fall.

At the same time, the budget is building on what we have learned from over the past few months and the Government of Canada is making some historic investments to implement national standards for long-term care and to create a national child-care system.

Additionally, the budget delivered substantial additional support for seniors over 75 and children, among many other things. These are all critical parts of setting Canada up for a strong economic recovery.

Thursday, May. 13, 2021

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Winnipeg North MP Kevin Lamoureux writes that Habitat for Humanity’s programs will be supported as part of the federal government’s recent budget.

Supporting people and businesses the only option

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

Supporting people and businesses the only option

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021

It was back on Jan. 4, 2020, that the World Health Organization tweeted, based on a report it had received that “Investigations are underway to identify the cause of this illness.”

The weeks that followed saw countries around the world reporting on how quickly this novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, was spreading. We were initially told masks were not necessary but that we had to wash our hands a lot more.

How things have changed. Let there be no doubt there will be a new normal when things do get better.

We all had decisions to make with respect to the things we did, whether inside or outside our homes. Jobs, families, businesses and so much more were going to be impacted. It became clearly that the severity of the impact was going to depend on decisions made by governments.

Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021

It was back on Jan. 4, 2020, that the World Health Organization tweeted, based on a report it had received that “Investigations are underway to identify the cause of this illness.”

The weeks that followed saw countries around the world reporting on how quickly this novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, was spreading. We were initially told masks were not necessary but that we had to wash our hands a lot more.

How things have changed. Let there be no doubt there will be a new normal when things do get better.

We all had decisions to make with respect to the things we did, whether inside or outside our homes. Jobs, families, businesses and so much more were going to be impacted. It became clearly that the severity of the impact was going to depend on decisions made by governments.

Vaccines are here and the end may be in sight

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

Vaccines are here and the end may be in sight

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Sunday, Mar. 14, 2021

I plan to be the last 59-year-old in Winnipeg North to be vaccinated to fight the coronavirus.

In short, I will only agree to get my shots after every person my age and older has been given the opportunity. I do not want anyone to think or believe that I am getting special treatment.

Delaying my COVID-19 vaccination isn’t about vaccine-hesitancy. It’s about respect. I will wait my turn out of consideration for others - for the essential workers putting their own safety on the line every day, and for those who need the protection most.

This might mean I have to wait a little longer to be close with family and friends again, but so be it. This is a small price to pay to keep my neighbours and my community healthy.

Sunday, Mar. 14, 2021

Dreamstime.com
Canada will have received eight million doses of COVID-19 vaccines by the end of March.

We must reimagine the downtown Bay

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

We must reimagine the downtown Bay

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021

Back on Nov. 18, 1926, the brand-new flagship store of the Hudson’s Bay Company opened its doors in downtown Winnipeg, just up the street from the Manitoba legislature that had opened six years before it. 

Can you imagine what an incredible sight that would have been?

At the time of its opening, the building was still under construction, but the first three floors were humming with customers. At the time, Winnipeg’s downtown Bay was the largest reinforced concrete building in Canada.

There was a time in Winnipeg when talking about Eaton’s and The Bay downtown meant excitement in anticipation of a shopping adventure.

Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021

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The downtown Hudson’s Bay Company building, shown here while under construction in the 1920, is an important piece of Winnipeg’s architectural and cultural heritage.

Winnipeg can be a year-round playground

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

Winnipeg can be a year-round playground

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Friday, Jan. 15, 2021

Winnipeg has four very distinct seasons — from ice-cold winters to extreme summer heat waves. The most common reason so many people leave Winnipeg, either permanently or for a few months every year, is the cold weather.

I believe we need to do more to invest in and promote the benefits of living in Winnipeg year-round. By doing this we will see healthier communities and a healthier economy.

We love our summers but what about our winters? Are there more things we can do to make winter a more enjoyable part of the year? When was the last time you went skiing?

The other day, while driving past Westview Park, which is better known to me and many others as Garbage Hill, I saw what looked to be over 100 people sliding down the hill, running back up, laughing and smiling the whole way.

Friday, Jan. 15, 2021

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A crowd of tobogganers recently enjoyed the warm January weather at Westview Park, a.k.a. Garbage Hill.

Reflecting on the Year of the Coronavirus

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

Reflecting on the Year of the Coronavirus

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Monday, Dec. 21, 2020

I will stay inside my small circle, but I am not cancelling my Christmas celebrations, and I still plan on making some New Year’s resolutions.

The year 2020 will best be remembered for the novel coronavirus pandemic and the impact it had around the world. Even with modern technology and advances in healt care, hundreds of thousands of people died as millions were infected. Countries have been closed to outsiders, economies have been shut down and people have been asked to stay home, all while essential workers continue to support our communities.

Christmas is around the corner, and people across Canada are being asked to stay home this year so that we can better minimize the negative impact of the coronavirus. The holidays are looking different than they ever have.

While we are not visiting homes and attending Christmas and holiday parties this year, Christmas has not been cancelled and we should still celebrate the New Year later this month.

Monday, Dec. 21, 2020

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Winnipeg North MP Kevin Lamoureux will hold a live Christmas event on Facebook at 7 p.m. on Dec. 23.

We must ensure that Folklorama survives

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

We must ensure that Folklorama survives

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Monday, Nov. 23, 2020

Arts festivals and cultural events such as Folklorama are all-important to our city but have unfortunately been affected by COVID-19.

The novel coronavirus has impacted every aspect of our lives but its effects might be the most obvious on community events. There are countless celebrations that bring Winnipeg together each year — my annual Canada Day fireworks at Tyndall Park, the Filipino Street Festival in the Maples, the Blue Bombers’ next winning season …

One of the most significant among these is Folklorama. I think many people in Winnipeg take this incredible event for granted. Most of us probably don’t realize that it’s the largest multicultural festival of its kind in the world. Tourists travel from far and wide to visit for good reason.

You can tour the world in your own backyard here in Winnipeg, and it is often my first recommendation to people visiting Winnipeg. We have held Folklorama for over 50 years, and its impact on our city and province has been significant. We see it every summer for two weeks, but for many of the volunteers, from pavilion co-ordinators to youth creating and practising their performances, it consumes their time year-round.

Monday, Nov. 23, 2020

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Winnipeg North MP Kevin Lamoureux (far right), pictured here with Cindy Lamoureux (back, left), MLA for Tyndall Park, at the Pearl of the Orient pavilion at a past Folklorama, is working to ensure cultural groups survive the COVID-19 pandemic.

Protect and build our canopy of trees

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

Protect and build our canopy of trees

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Monday, Oct. 26, 2020

I am very proud to call Winnipeg home and often, while flying into or out of our city, I will look out the window and see hundreds of thousands of trees.

Our trees are scattered throughout our communities and come in many variations, from the mighty maples and oaks to our Christmas spruce trees to fruit trees, shrubs and so many more. 

Our rivers, parks and public places draw us to them in part because of their trees. From Point Douglas to Tyndall Park you will see thousands of mature trees, while communities in newer neighbourhoods have much younger stock. We are still struggling to recover from the terrible snowstorm last Thanksgiving, in which thousands of trees were damaged and far too many lost, causing serious damage to our canopy.

The point of this story is to say that, no matter where you live in Winnipeg, we could always use more trees.

Monday, Oct. 26, 2020

Supplied photo
A father and son from Iglesia ni Christo church plant a tree in Woodsworth Park. Church members planted 271 trees over two days.

Supporting Winnipeg Transit — for all of us

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

Supporting Winnipeg Transit — for all of us

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Monday, Sep. 28, 2020

The Government of Canada is investing hundreds of millions to support public transportation in Canada, of which well over $20 million should be going to Winnipeg Transit.

I understand the importance of investing in our public buses and I am happy to say the federal government is stepping up to support public transit and this is not our first time, either.

Healthy, vibrant public transit systems are important for big cities for numerous reasons. They provide many people with mobility for work, grocery shopping and more; they reduce traffic in general and fewer cars on the road is better for our environment. It is critical that Winnipeg Transit be supported as we have a growing city and public transit is facing one of the most difficult times in its history.

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected every aspect of our lives and its impact on our transit system can’t be underestimated. There has been a tremendous drop in ridership, as many Manitobans are working from home, avoiding non-essential trips, or choosing cars and bicycles over the bus.

Monday, Sep. 28, 2020

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Thousands of people in Winnipeg North rely on Winnipeg Transit to meet their basic transportation needs.

Looking to Dr. José Rizal for inspiration

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

Looking to Dr. José Rizal for inspiration

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Monday, Aug. 31, 2020

Anyone driving north on Keewatin Street will notice two things once you hit Adsum Drive.

One is, Keewatin Street turns into Dr. Jose Rizal Way; and two, there you will find a more-than-life-size statue of Dr. José Rizal. On Aug. 24 I had the opportunity to attend the unveiling of a new monument and someone later asked me, “Who is Dr. José Rizal?”

A quick Google search will give a lot of detail as to who he was. Rizal is recognized by many people as the founding father of the Philippine Independence movement. While vast majority of people living in Canada of Filipino heritage are familiar with Dr. Rizal, he’s not so well known internationally compared to say, Mahatma Gandhi.

Dr. José Rizal was born in 1861 and led a remarkable life. A brilliant and highly educated person, he spoke 22 languages, worked as a scientist, ophthalmologist, writer and artist. He wrote several novels like Noli Me Tángere (Touch Me Not) that pointed out the terrible unfairness in his society, and fuelled the struggle for Philippine independence.

Monday, Aug. 31, 2020

Anyone driving north on Keewatin Street will notice two things once you hit Adsum Drive.

One is, Keewatin Street turns into Dr. Jose Rizal Way; and two, there you will find a more-than-life-size statue of Dr. José Rizal. On Aug. 24 I had the opportunity to attend the unveiling of a new monument and someone later asked me, “Who is Dr. José Rizal?”

A quick Google search will give a lot of detail as to who he was. Rizal is recognized by many people as the founding father of the Philippine Independence movement. While vast majority of people living in Canada of Filipino heritage are familiar with Dr. Rizal, he’s not so well known internationally compared to say, Mahatma Gandhi.

Dr. José Rizal was born in 1861 and led a remarkable life. A brilliant and highly educated person, he spoke 22 languages, worked as a scientist, ophthalmologist, writer and artist. He wrote several novels like Noli Me Tángere (Touch Me Not) that pointed out the terrible unfairness in his society, and fuelled the struggle for Philippine independence.

The Red River has so much more potential

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

The Red River has so much more potential

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020

Many of us pass over, or along the Red and Assiniboine rivers every day. We might not even think about them, unless we’re stuck in traffic on a bridge.

The mighty Red River that flows through our city is a natural asset that we politicians have neglected for far to long. It is time that we get more serious about a long-term plan for the Red River and how it can best provide its potential for future generations of Winnipeggers. We need a group of people to come together with a mission, a mission that would include a plan that would be friendly to our environment and see that the public in general have access to parks, walkways and so much more.

It’s not just a coincidence that these rivers are at the heart of our city. They’re our city’s very reason for being. In its earliest days, Winnipeg was called the Red River Settlement.

The confluence of the Red and Assiniboine has been a hub of trade and cultural exchange for more than 6,000 years. Indigenous groups and European fur traders chose to settle here so they could control the rivers and travel across the continent.

Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020

Mike Sudoma / Winnipeg Free Press photo archives
A cyclist looks out at a river boat driving along the Red River. Does Winnipeg need a waterways authority?

Connecting our community in new ways

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

Connecting our community in new ways

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Tuesday, Jul. 7, 2020

Summer has always been my favourite season. It’s the time when our community usually gathers to mark so many important milestones.

We celebrate Filipino Heritage Month in June but this year we had to cancel our wonderful street festival and cultural events. June 21 marked Indigenous Peoples Day, and this year I had hoped to launch my first annual celebration in honour of it. We also usually celebrate our great country’s birthday with block parties, concerts and so much more.

I’m sure a few of you missed my annual fireworks show at Tyndall Park. I know I certainly did. I’ve been hosting it for almost 30 years, and cancelling this year’s event was tough.

We’re all adjusting to a ‘new normal’ and it’s been really strange not having the big public parties we’re used to. Even so, that doesn’t mean our holidays are cancelled.

Tuesday, Jul. 7, 2020

Summer has always been my favourite season. It’s the time when our community usually gathers to mark so many important milestones.

We celebrate Filipino Heritage Month in June but this year we had to cancel our wonderful street festival and cultural events. June 21 marked Indigenous Peoples Day, and this year I had hoped to launch my first annual celebration in honour of it. We also usually celebrate our great country’s birthday with block parties, concerts and so much more.

I’m sure a few of you missed my annual fireworks show at Tyndall Park. I know I certainly did. I’ve been hosting it for almost 30 years, and cancelling this year’s event was tough.

We’re all adjusting to a ‘new normal’ and it’s been really strange not having the big public parties we’re used to. Even so, that doesn’t mean our holidays are cancelled.

We must take positive steps to combat racism

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Preview

We must take positive steps to combat racism

Kevin Lamoureux - MP for Winnipeg North 3 minute read Monday, Jun. 15, 2020

Winnipeg North is a diverse community and we aren’t strangers to the issue of racism.

Like many people, I get chills thinking about the video of George Floyd’s death and his last, terrifying words: “I can’t breathe.”

The incredible show of support for the Black Lives Matter movement at our legislature on June 5 brought this problem to light for many people, but it shouldn’t come as a surprise. It’s tempting to think that these problems are far away in Toronto, or the United States, but the sad truth is that many of my constituents face racism every single day.

“Minority communities” actually make up the majority of people in Winnipeg North, and yet they still face unfair barriers and discrimination.

Monday, Jun. 15, 2020

Winnipeg North is a diverse community and we aren’t strangers to the issue of racism.

Like many people, I get chills thinking about the video of George Floyd’s death and his last, terrifying words: “I can’t breathe.”

The incredible show of support for the Black Lives Matter movement at our legislature on June 5 brought this problem to light for many people, but it shouldn’t come as a surprise. It’s tempting to think that these problems are far away in Toronto, or the United States, but the sad truth is that many of my constituents face racism every single day.

“Minority communities” actually make up the majority of people in Winnipeg North, and yet they still face unfair barriers and discrimination.