Leah Gazan

Leah Gazan

Winnipeg Centre constituency report

Leah Gazan is the NDP Member of Parliament for Winnipeg Centre.

Recent articles of Leah Gazan

Lions Place sale should be paused

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Preview

Lions Place sale should be paused

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022

There is a severe shortage of genuinely affordable housing in our city, particularly for seniors. That’s why, along with Uzoma Asagwara, MLA for Union Station, I am calling for the sale of Lions Place to be put on hold until a new non-profit buyer can be found.

Lions Place is a non-profit seniors’ housing complex with 287 affordable housing units in the downtown area. For its many residents, Lions Place is more than just a roof over their heads, it is a thriving community featuring a garden, a library run by volunteers, art classes and more.

I have met with residents who are deeply concerned that if the building is sold to a for-profit buyer, it could result in people being priced out of their homes. This very situation happened recently when a Manitoba Housing complex at 185 Smith St. was sold by the province. What was previously 200 units of affordable housing for low-income seniors has been turned into high-end lofts that rent for $2,000 a month.

We can’t afford to lose any more much-needed affordable seniors’ housing in downtown Winnipeg. That’s why MLA Asagwara and I are calling on the provincial and federal governments to step in and ensure no residents will lose their homes.

Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022

John Woods / Winnipeg Free Press

For its many residents, Lions Place is a thriving community featuring a garden, a library run by volunteers, art classes and more.

Fighting for what our community needs

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Preview

Fighting for what our community needs

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Wednesday, Sep. 14, 2022

With the arrival of fall, I’m reflecting on what a busy and productive summer it’s been here in Winnipeg Centre. I spent much of this summer in conversation with constituents, meeting with community-based organizations, and attending events. I want to thank everyone who came to one of our barbecues, volunteered their time, or visited our office. It has been wonderful to spend time together, discuss the incredible work being done in our communities, and collectively imagine an economic and socially just future. This community is truly a special place.

My No. 1 priority continues to be ensuring that our riding gets the resources and supports that we need. There is plenty of good news to share on this front, including the purchase of the downtown Bay building by the Southern Chiefs Organization, funded in part by $65 million in federal low-cost and forgivable loans. The new space will be transformational for the downtown area and will include 289 new units of affordable housing which are desperately needed in our community. We have also significantly increased the amount of Canada Summer Jobs funding to $2.45 million, up from $1.6 million last year. This money will help support youth employment opportunities throughout Winnipeg Centre.

However, much more needs to be done. Parliament returns on Sept. 19, and I’ll be back in Ottawa fighting for our community and the human rights of all people. I plan to raise issues including the high cost of living, climate justice, mental health and addictions supports, affordable housing, and the ongoing crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

Along with my colleagues, including Jenny Kwan, MP for Vancouver East and NDP critic for immigration, refugees and citizenship, I will also be raising concerns regarding the disastrous state of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). IRCC is in disarray, with over two million applications stuck in a constantly growing backlog. There are lengthy delays affecting permanent resident applications, family reunification, work or study permit renewals or applications, and more. We need urgent action to address this, including an immediate increase in staffing levels to deal with the backlogs and removing the cap on applications.

Wednesday, Sep. 14, 2022

With the arrival of fall, I’m reflecting on what a busy and productive summer it’s been here in Winnipeg Centre. I spent much of this summer in conversation with constituents, meeting with community-based organizations, and attending events. I want to thank everyone who came to one of our barbecues, volunteered their time, or visited our office. It has been wonderful to spend time together, discuss the incredible work being done in our communities, and collectively imagine an economic and socially just future. This community is truly a special place.

My No. 1 priority continues to be ensuring that our riding gets the resources and supports that we need. There is plenty of good news to share on this front, including the purchase of the downtown Bay building by the Southern Chiefs Organization, funded in part by $65 million in federal low-cost and forgivable loans. The new space will be transformational for the downtown area and will include 289 new units of affordable housing which are desperately needed in our community. We have also significantly increased the amount of Canada Summer Jobs funding to $2.45 million, up from $1.6 million last year. This money will help support youth employment opportunities throughout Winnipeg Centre.

However, much more needs to be done. Parliament returns on Sept. 19, and I’ll be back in Ottawa fighting for our community and the human rights of all people. I plan to raise issues including the high cost of living, climate justice, mental health and addictions supports, affordable housing, and the ongoing crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

Along with my colleagues, including Jenny Kwan, MP for Vancouver East and NDP critic for immigration, refugees and citizenship, I will also be raising concerns regarding the disastrous state of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). IRCC is in disarray, with over two million applications stuck in a constantly growing backlog. There are lengthy delays affecting permanent resident applications, family reunification, work or study permit renewals or applications, and more. We need urgent action to address this, including an immediate increase in staffing levels to deal with the backlogs and removing the cap on applications.

Time for real action to address cost of living

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Preview

Time for real action to address cost of living

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 27, 2022

The last few months have been a difficult time for families and individuals in our community, as inflation continues to make the cost of almost everything more expensive. On July 20, inflation rose to 8.1 per cent, a 39-year high.

What does this mean for people? It means higher grocery bills (8.8 per cent increase in food prices) and much more expensive to fill up a tank of gas (54.6 per cent higher prices at the pumps). It means more households in Winnipeg Centre struggling to make ends meet, and more people being forced to use food banks.

At the same time, workers’ wages are not keeping pace with inflation, even as big corporations rake in record profits. Loblaws, Canada’s largest grocery chain, saw its profits soar by 40 per cent in the first quarter of this year, way beyond the rate of inflation.

Workers, seniors, and individuals on social assistance did not cause this inflation crisis, and they should not be the ones to pay for it. By taxing the windfall profits of big grocery chains, fossil fuel companies, banks and insurance companies who are recording record profits, we can give people the help they need to get through this difficult time.

Wednesday, Jul. 27, 2022

The last few months have been a difficult time for families and individuals in our community, as inflation continues to make the cost of almost everything more expensive. On July 20, inflation rose to 8.1 per cent, a 39-year high.

What does this mean for people? It means higher grocery bills (8.8 per cent increase in food prices) and much more expensive to fill up a tank of gas (54.6 per cent higher prices at the pumps). It means more households in Winnipeg Centre struggling to make ends meet, and more people being forced to use food banks.

At the same time, workers’ wages are not keeping pace with inflation, even as big corporations rake in record profits. Loblaws, Canada’s largest grocery chain, saw its profits soar by 40 per cent in the first quarter of this year, way beyond the rate of inflation.

Workers, seniors, and individuals on social assistance did not cause this inflation crisis, and they should not be the ones to pay for it. By taxing the windfall profits of big grocery chains, fossil fuel companies, banks and insurance companies who are recording record profits, we can give people the help they need to get through this difficult time.

We need low-barrier safe spaces

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Preview

We need low-barrier safe spaces

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 8, 2022

The past month has been difficult for our community. Over the span of just a few weeks, three Indigenous women have been killed. Their names are Rebecca Contois, Doris Trout, and Tessa Perry. My heartfelt sympathies go to their families, friends, and communities. Their lives were precious. They were loved.

My love and care also goes to all families who have experienced violence, who might still be searching for loved ones.

Amidst this violence and the ongoing genocide against Indigenous women, girls and two-spirit individuals, our community continues to lead the way. Organizations and families are unwavering in their support for each other, care for one another, and have very clear demands — we must fulfil all 231 Calls for Justice as outlined in the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. This includes Call for Justice 4.7, which calls upon:

“all governments to support the establishment and long-term sustainable funding of Indigenous-led low-barrier shelters, safe spaces, transition homes, second stage housing, and services for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people…”

Wednesday, Jun. 8, 2022

Tessa Perry was one of three Indigenous women recently killed in Winnipeg. Winnipeg Centre MP Leah Gazan writes that the federal government must act on long-term sustainable funding of Indigenous-led low-barrier shelters, safe spaces, transition homes, second-stage housing and services.

Share your vision for Portage Place with us

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Preview

Share your vision for Portage Place with us

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Wednesday, Apr. 20, 2022

On Thurs., March 31, my office hosted a telephone town hall meeting to discuss the future of Portage Place and community priorities for the mall. Nearly 1,600 residents joined the call to imagine what a community-led vision for the space could look like.

The community needs to be at the centre of any new development of the mall; this hasn’t been the case in the past. Recent developments downtown have been built with the aim of bringing people downtown, rather than to benefit the families and individuals already living there.

Since the recently proposed sale of the mall broke down, our team has been working alongside the community to engage with residents, answer questions, and listen to the many creative ideas for the mall.

Portage Place is currently relied upon by many residents as a warm gathering space and de facto community centre. But downtown needs so much more than that! We heard this loud and clear from those on the call and in follow-up communications with our office.

Wednesday, Apr. 20, 2022

Any redevelopment of Portage Place has to consider the community living in the area.

Standing up for our democracy

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Preview

Standing up for our democracy

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Wednesday, Mar. 2, 2022

It has been a difficult time for our country and our community. February has been a month defined by an illegal occupation that, until recently, brought our nation’s capital to its knees and temporarily shut down several international border crossings on which millions of jobs depend. Smaller occupations, including in Winnipeg Centre, have subjected residents to days of harassment and sonic torture.

Over the last few weeks, I have been working to ensure that your voices are heard loud and clear in parliament and that downtown Winnipeg residents are supported.

In parliament, during a debate regarding the federal government’s invocation of the Emergencies Act, I spoke about the threats facing our democracy. I’m concerned by the spread of misinformation, the threats to journalists, the large amount of anonymous, foreign funding that helped sustain the illegal occupation and the roles of former police and intelligence officials who involved in organizing it. I’m deeply concerned by the racist and xenophobic rhetoric espoused by self-proclaimed “leaders” of the convoy, including Pat King, who said that “the Anglo-Saxon race” has “the strongest bloodlines.”

I noted that the NDP’s support for this emergency legislation is not a blank cheque, and we are ready to withdraw our support at any time if there is any overreach or indication that these measures are no longer required.

Wednesday, Mar. 2, 2022

It has been a difficult time for our country and our community. February has been a month defined by an illegal occupation that, until recently, brought our nation’s capital to its knees and temporarily shut down several international border crossings on which millions of jobs depend. Smaller occupations, including in Winnipeg Centre, have subjected residents to days of harassment and sonic torture.

Over the last few weeks, I have been working to ensure that your voices are heard loud and clear in parliament and that downtown Winnipeg residents are supported.

In parliament, during a debate regarding the federal government’s invocation of the Emergencies Act, I spoke about the threats facing our democracy. I’m concerned by the spread of misinformation, the threats to journalists, the large amount of anonymous, foreign funding that helped sustain the illegal occupation and the roles of former police and intelligence officials who involved in organizing it. I’m deeply concerned by the racist and xenophobic rhetoric espoused by self-proclaimed “leaders” of the convoy, including Pat King, who said that “the Anglo-Saxon race” has “the strongest bloodlines.”

I noted that the NDP’s support for this emergency legislation is not a blank cheque, and we are ready to withdraw our support at any time if there is any overreach or indication that these measures are no longer required.

Advocating for a better world for all

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Preview

Advocating for a better world for all

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Monday, Nov. 29, 2021

The House of Commons has resumed sitting in Ottawa and I am ready to continue advocating for Winnipeg Centre.

In addition to being the NDP critic for children, families, and social development, I am now the NDP critic for women and gender equality, as well as the deputy critic for housing. I am committed to pushing for the creation of systems that advance rights and ensure that all individuals in our community have what they need to thrive and not just survive.

This includes many children in Winnipeg Centre who are forced to live in poverty as a result of inadequate political will to ensure their human rights are upheld.

In honour of the National Day of the Child, which was Nov. 20, I wish to highlight the ongoing struggles that many children face in our community and throughout Canada.

Monday, Nov. 29, 2021

The House of Commons has resumed sitting in Ottawa and I am ready to continue advocating for Winnipeg Centre.

In addition to being the NDP critic for children, families, and social development, I am now the NDP critic for women and gender equality, as well as the deputy critic for housing. I am committed to pushing for the creation of systems that advance rights and ensure that all individuals in our community have what they need to thrive and not just survive.

This includes many children in Winnipeg Centre who are forced to live in poverty as a result of inadequate political will to ensure their human rights are upheld.

In honour of the National Day of the Child, which was Nov. 20, I wish to highlight the ongoing struggles that many children face in our community and throughout Canada.

Liberals must support low-income seniors

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Preview

Liberals must support low-income seniors

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Friday, Oct. 29, 2021

First of all, I want to take this opportunity to thank the residents of Winnipeg Centre for allowing me to continue serving as your member of Parliament. I am inspired everyday by the pride we have for our community, and it is an honour to be your representative in Ottawa. Our team will continue to serve our riding with care, love, and solidarity while we fight for human rights for all.

Throughout the pandemic, our Winnipeg Centre office has helped individuals, community organizations, and small businesses access various federal emergency supports that have been available. While many programs have been limited and flawed, members of our community have relied on these supports over the last year and a half.

Despite the fact that we are in a fourth wave of COVID-19, the Liberal government has chosen not to extend several pandemic supports, including the Canada Recovery Benefit, which places many residents in our community at risk of becoming unhoused and food insecure.

This is unfortunate. The success of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit has demonstrated that we have the resources to lift individuals out of poverty and ensure that no one is left behind. What we need, however, is the political will to ensure this happens. This is why I introduced Motion 46, which called on the government to replace the CERB with a permanent guaranteed livable basic income.

Friday, Oct. 29, 2021

First of all, I want to take this opportunity to thank the residents of Winnipeg Centre for allowing me to continue serving as your member of Parliament. I am inspired everyday by the pride we have for our community, and it is an honour to be your representative in Ottawa. Our team will continue to serve our riding with care, love, and solidarity while we fight for human rights for all.

Throughout the pandemic, our Winnipeg Centre office has helped individuals, community organizations, and small businesses access various federal emergency supports that have been available. While many programs have been limited and flawed, members of our community have relied on these supports over the last year and a half.

Despite the fact that we are in a fourth wave of COVID-19, the Liberal government has chosen not to extend several pandemic supports, including the Canada Recovery Benefit, which places many residents in our community at risk of becoming unhoused and food insecure.

This is unfortunate. The success of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit has demonstrated that we have the resources to lift individuals out of poverty and ensure that no one is left behind. What we need, however, is the political will to ensure this happens. This is why I introduced Motion 46, which called on the government to replace the CERB with a permanent guaranteed livable basic income.

Liberals must support low-income seniors

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Preview

Liberals must support low-income seniors

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Friday, Oct. 29, 2021

First of all, I want to take this opportunity to thank the residents of Winnipeg Centre for allowing me to continue serving as your member of Parliament. I am inspired everyday by the pride we have for our community, and it is an honour to be your representative in Ottawa. Our team will continue to serve our riding with care, love, and solidarity while we fight for human rights for all.

Throughout the pandemic, our Winnipeg Centre office has helped individuals, community organizations, and small businesses access various federal emergency supports that have been available. While many programs have been limited and flawed, members of our community have relied on these supports over the last year and a half.

Despite the fact that we are in a fourth wave of COVID-19, the Liberal government has chosen not to extend several pandemic supports, including the Canada Recovery Benefit, which places many residents in our community at risk of becoming unhoused and food insecure.

This is unfortunate. The success of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit has demonstrated that we have the resources to lift individuals out of poverty and ensure that no one is left behind. What we need, however, is the political will to ensure this happens. This is why I introduced Motion 46, which called on the government to replace the CERB with a permanent guaranteed livable basic income.

Friday, Oct. 29, 2021

First of all, I want to take this opportunity to thank the residents of Winnipeg Centre for allowing me to continue serving as your member of Parliament. I am inspired everyday by the pride we have for our community, and it is an honour to be your representative in Ottawa. Our team will continue to serve our riding with care, love, and solidarity while we fight for human rights for all.

Throughout the pandemic, our Winnipeg Centre office has helped individuals, community organizations, and small businesses access various federal emergency supports that have been available. While many programs have been limited and flawed, members of our community have relied on these supports over the last year and a half.

Despite the fact that we are in a fourth wave of COVID-19, the Liberal government has chosen not to extend several pandemic supports, including the Canada Recovery Benefit, which places many residents in our community at risk of becoming unhoused and food insecure.

This is unfortunate. The success of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit has demonstrated that we have the resources to lift individuals out of poverty and ensure that no one is left behind. What we need, however, is the political will to ensure this happens. This is why I introduced Motion 46, which called on the government to replace the CERB with a permanent guaranteed livable basic income.

Our climate is in crisis – it’s time to act

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Preview

Our climate is in crisis – it’s time to act

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Friday, Aug. 13, 2021

On Thurs., July 29, climate justice organizers and community members gathered outside our constituency office at 892 Sargent Ave. to demand action on the climate emergency.

The rally was held as part of 350.org’s national day of action calling on Members of Parliament to act boldly in the fight against the climate crisis.

Using the hashtag #CanadaOnFire, event organizers are sending a clear message that the increase in wildfires is a direct result of the climate emergency, something that has been clearly supported by science.

It is for this reason that, at this critical juncture, I was proud to sign their Canada on Fire pledge, committing to act with the urgency that is required to mitigate the climate crisis.

Friday, Aug. 13, 2021

On Thurs., July 29, climate justice organizers and community members gathered outside our constituency office at 892 Sargent Ave. to demand action on the climate emergency.

The rally was held as part of 350.org’s national day of action calling on Members of Parliament to act boldly in the fight against the climate crisis.

Using the hashtag #CanadaOnFire, event organizers are sending a clear message that the increase in wildfires is a direct result of the climate emergency, something that has been clearly supported by science.

It is for this reason that, at this critical juncture, I was proud to sign their Canada on Fire pledge, committing to act with the urgency that is required to mitigate the climate crisis.

Indigenous rights recognized by Parliament

Leah Gazan - MP for Winnipeg Centre 3 minute read Preview

Indigenous rights recognized by Parliament

Leah Gazan - MP for Winnipeg Centre 3 minute read Thursday, Jul. 15, 2021

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on Sept. 13, 2007, to enshrine the rights that “constitute the minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world.”

The declaration was the result of over two decades of negotiations between Indigenous peoples, civil society groups, and nation-states consisting of a preamble and 46 articles that define the inherent minimum human rights of Indigenous peoples, as there was a recognition that the rights of Indigenous peoples were violated throughout the world.

The articles within the declaration affirm the social, cultural, political, economic, environmental and spiritual rights of Indigenous peoples. This includes the right to self-determination — the right to free, prior and informed consent over matters impacting Indigenous rights including the development of natural resources on Indigenous territories.

After many years of advocacy by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, including so many in our community of Winnipeg Centre, on June 21, Bill C-15, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, received Royal Assent, after passing both chambers of Canada’s House of Parliament.

Thursday, Jul. 15, 2021

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on Sept. 13, 2007, to enshrine the rights that “constitute the minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world.”

The declaration was the result of over two decades of negotiations between Indigenous peoples, civil society groups, and nation-states consisting of a preamble and 46 articles that define the inherent minimum human rights of Indigenous peoples, as there was a recognition that the rights of Indigenous peoples were violated throughout the world.

The articles within the declaration affirm the social, cultural, political, economic, environmental and spiritual rights of Indigenous peoples. This includes the right to self-determination — the right to free, prior and informed consent over matters impacting Indigenous rights including the development of natural resources on Indigenous territories.

After many years of advocacy by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, including so many in our community of Winnipeg Centre, on June 21, Bill C-15, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, received Royal Assent, after passing both chambers of Canada’s House of Parliament.

Indigenous rights recognized by Parliament

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Preview

Indigenous rights recognized by Parliament

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Friday, Jul. 9, 2021

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on Sept. 13, 2007, to enshrine the rights that “constitute the minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world.”

The Declaration was the result of over two decades of negotiations between Indigenous peoples, civil society groups, and nation states consisting of a preamble and 46 articles that define the inherent minimum human rights of Indigenous peoples, as there was a recognition that the rights of Indigenous peoples were violated throughout the world.

The articles within the Declaration affirm the social, cultural, political, economic, environmental and spiritual rights of Indigenous peoples. This includes the right to self-determination, the right to free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) over matters impacting Indigenous rights including the development of natural resources on Indigenous territories.

After many years of advocacy by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, including so many in our community of Winnipeg Centre, on Monday, June 21st, Bill C-15, The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, received Royal Assent, after passing both chambers of Canada’s Houses of Parliament.

Friday, Jul. 9, 2021

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on Sept. 13, 2007, to enshrine the rights that “constitute the minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world.”

The Declaration was the result of over two decades of negotiations between Indigenous peoples, civil society groups, and nation states consisting of a preamble and 46 articles that define the inherent minimum human rights of Indigenous peoples, as there was a recognition that the rights of Indigenous peoples were violated throughout the world.

The articles within the Declaration affirm the social, cultural, political, economic, environmental and spiritual rights of Indigenous peoples. This includes the right to self-determination, the right to free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) over matters impacting Indigenous rights including the development of natural resources on Indigenous territories.

After many years of advocacy by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, including so many in our community of Winnipeg Centre, on Monday, June 21st, Bill C-15, The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, received Royal Assent, after passing both chambers of Canada’s Houses of Parliament.

It’s past time to act on Calls to Action

Leah Gazan - MP for Winnipeg Centre 3 minute read Preview

It’s past time to act on Calls to Action

Leah Gazan - MP for Winnipeg Centre 3 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 16, 2021

Last week, I spoke at an emergency debate about the discovery of the bodies of 215 children at Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc at the Kamloops Indian Residential School, one of the largest schools in the IRS system.

I criticized the Liberal government’s abysmal record on reconciliation and the fact that it has been six years since the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report, and, according to the Yellowhead Institute, only eight of the TRC’s 94 Calls to Action have been completed.

The sad truth is that the tragic discovery at Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc was a reminder of the many children who lost their lives as a result of genocide in the IRS system. Many of these children were placed in unmarked graves, never to return home, leaving families wondering where their loved ones were.

In fact, according to former Sen. Murray Sinclair, the former chair of the TRC, the number of children still to be found could be as high as 25,000 as a result of genocidal actions noted in the TRC’s final report.

Wednesday, Jun. 16, 2021

Last week, I spoke at an emergency debate about the discovery of the bodies of 215 children at Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc at the Kamloops Indian Residential School, one of the largest schools in the IRS system.

I criticized the Liberal government’s abysmal record on reconciliation and the fact that it has been six years since the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report, and, according to the Yellowhead Institute, only eight of the TRC’s 94 Calls to Action have been completed.

The sad truth is that the tragic discovery at Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc was a reminder of the many children who lost their lives as a result of genocide in the IRS system. Many of these children were placed in unmarked graves, never to return home, leaving families wondering where their loved ones were.

In fact, according to former Sen. Murray Sinclair, the former chair of the TRC, the number of children still to be found could be as high as 25,000 as a result of genocidal actions noted in the TRC’s final report.

It’s past time to act upon Calls to Action

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Preview

It’s past time to act upon Calls to Action

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 16, 2021

Last week, I spoke at an emergency debate about the discovery of the bodies of 215 children at Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc at the Kamloops Indian Residential School, one of the largest schools in the IRS system.

I criticised the Liberal government’s abysmal record on reconciliation and the fact that it has been six years since the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report, and, according to the Yellowhead Institute, only eight of the TRC’s 94 Calls to Action have been completed.

The sad truth is that the tragic discovery at Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc was a reminder of the many children who lost their lives as a result of genocide in the IRS system. Many of these children were placed in unmarked graves, never to return home, leaving families wondering where their loved ones were.

In fact, according to former Sen. Murray Sinclair, the former chair of the TRC, the number of children still to be found could be as high as 25,000 as a result of genocidal actions noted in the TRC’s final report.

Wednesday, Jun. 16, 2021

Last week, I spoke at an emergency debate about the discovery of the bodies of 215 children at Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc at the Kamloops Indian Residential School, one of the largest schools in the IRS system.

I criticised the Liberal government’s abysmal record on reconciliation and the fact that it has been six years since the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report, and, according to the Yellowhead Institute, only eight of the TRC’s 94 Calls to Action have been completed.

The sad truth is that the tragic discovery at Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc was a reminder of the many children who lost their lives as a result of genocide in the IRS system. Many of these children were placed in unmarked graves, never to return home, leaving families wondering where their loved ones were.

In fact, according to former Sen. Murray Sinclair, the former chair of the TRC, the number of children still to be found could be as high as 25,000 as a result of genocidal actions noted in the TRC’s final report.

Moving to establish basic income for all

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Preview

Moving to establish basic income for all

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Friday, May. 21, 2021

On April 28, I brought forward a unanimous consent motion in the House of Commons for the establishment of a guaranteed livable basic income (GLBI), also known as Motion-46.

A GLBI would provide a regular and unconditional livable income to those who need it, as an effort to ensure the dignity and human rights of all people living in Canada. Unfortunately, the Liberals said no to my motion.

Regardless, the movement built by thousands across the country in support of Motion-46 has truly changed the conversation around basic income.

Since launching Motion-46 in August 2020, we gathered over 40,000 signatures from folks around the country, including thousands of people here in Winnipeg Centre.

Friday, May. 21, 2021

On April 28, I brought forward a unanimous consent motion in the House of Commons for the establishment of a guaranteed livable basic income (GLBI), also known as Motion-46.

A GLBI would provide a regular and unconditional livable income to those who need it, as an effort to ensure the dignity and human rights of all people living in Canada. Unfortunately, the Liberals said no to my motion.

Regardless, the movement built by thousands across the country in support of Motion-46 has truly changed the conversation around basic income.

Since launching Motion-46 in August 2020, we gathered over 40,000 signatures from folks around the country, including thousands of people here in Winnipeg Centre.

Poverty and income inequality must be addressed

Leah Gazan - MP for Winnipeg Centre 3 minute read Preview

Poverty and income inequality must be addressed

Leah Gazan - MP for Winnipeg Centre 3 minute read Monday, Apr. 19, 2021

On March 31, I had the opportunity to speak with Winnipeg Centre residents during a telephone town hall event. After a difficult year, I was so excited to gather, over the phone, with hundreds of individuals across our riding.

We began the event with a discussion about poverty and income inequality in our community, specifically my private member’s motion, M-46, for a guaranteed livable basic income. M-46 calls for a guaranteed income program that would ensure a basic income for all residents of Canada in addition to current and future investments in our social safety net.

I am pleased to report that even the Parliamentary Budget Officer, an independent and non-partisan officer of parliament, recently reported the benefits of implementing an income guarantee that could cut poverty rates in Canada in half. This is critically important for Manitoba, where we could potentially reduce poverty rates by up to 61.9 per cent. This would have a huge impact in Winnipeg Centre, the third-poorest riding in the country, and it is something that I am committed to continue advocating for.

We also discussed the inadequacies of our current health-care system, and the need to expand health-care coverage to include universal dental care, pharmacare, and mental health care. There are serious gaps in our current system, and it is time that we ensure that everyone living in Canada has access to the care they need.

Monday, Apr. 19, 2021

On March 31, I had the opportunity to speak with Winnipeg Centre residents during a telephone town hall event. After a difficult year, I was so excited to gather, over the phone, with hundreds of individuals across our riding.

We began the event with a discussion about poverty and income inequality in our community, specifically my private member’s motion, M-46, for a guaranteed livable basic income. M-46 calls for a guaranteed income program that would ensure a basic income for all residents of Canada in addition to current and future investments in our social safety net.

I am pleased to report that even the Parliamentary Budget Officer, an independent and non-partisan officer of parliament, recently reported the benefits of implementing an income guarantee that could cut poverty rates in Canada in half. This is critically important for Manitoba, where we could potentially reduce poverty rates by up to 61.9 per cent. This would have a huge impact in Winnipeg Centre, the third-poorest riding in the country, and it is something that I am committed to continue advocating for.

We also discussed the inadequacies of our current health-care system, and the need to expand health-care coverage to include universal dental care, pharmacare, and mental health care. There are serious gaps in our current system, and it is time that we ensure that everyone living in Canada has access to the care they need.

Capitol attack a reminder to be vigilant

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Preview

Capitol attack a reminder to be vigilant

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2021

It was horrifying to watch events unfold in Washington D.C. on Jan. 6, as tens of thousands of people stormed the Capitol building.

This was an attack on democracy, and a clear demonstration of power from a growing and global alt-right terrorist movement. This was not just a collection of individuals upset at the result of the American election. It was an organized attack by extremists, fascists, and white supremacists.

Unfortunately, this is not unique to the United States. We must be vigilant, speak out against all forms of hate, and act decisively to combat fascism, and racism in Canada. Just in the last year, we have seen how violently white supremacy operates in our systems, and is celebrated by some of my political colleagues. This is an immediate threat to our democracy and the safety of our country.

We are witnessing the dangers of extremism in real time and we should not underestimate this threat.

Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2021

It was horrifying to watch events unfold in Washington D.C. on Jan. 6, as tens of thousands of people stormed the Capitol building.

This was an attack on democracy, and a clear demonstration of power from a growing and global alt-right terrorist movement. This was not just a collection of individuals upset at the result of the American election. It was an organized attack by extremists, fascists, and white supremacists.

Unfortunately, this is not unique to the United States. We must be vigilant, speak out against all forms of hate, and act decisively to combat fascism, and racism in Canada. Just in the last year, we have seen how violently white supremacy operates in our systems, and is celebrated by some of my political colleagues. This is an immediate threat to our democracy and the safety of our country.

We are witnessing the dangers of extremism in real time and we should not underestimate this threat.

Capitol attack a reminder to be vigilant

Leah Gazan - MP for Winnipeg Centre 2 minute read Preview

Capitol attack a reminder to be vigilant

Leah Gazan - MP for Winnipeg Centre 2 minute read Friday, Jan. 22, 2021

It was horrifying to watch events unfold in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 6, as thousands of people stormed the Capitol building.

This was an attack on democracy, and a clear demonstration of power from a growing and global alt-right terrorist movement. This was not just a collection of individuals upset at the result of the American election. It was an organized attack by extremists, fascists, and white supremacists.

Unfortunately, this is not unique to the United States. We must be vigilant, speak out against all forms of hate, and act decisively to combat fascism and racism in Canada. Just in the last year, we have seen how violently white supremacy operates in our systems, and is celebrated by some of my political colleagues. This is an immediate threat to our democracy and the safety of our country.

We are witnessing the dangers of extremism in real time and we should not underestimate this threat. We must act with hope, joy, and peace to combat it. It is therefore critical that we address clear human rights violations, and continue fighting for dignity, justice, and security for all persons.

Friday, Jan. 22, 2021

It was horrifying to watch events unfold in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 6, as thousands of people stormed the Capitol building.

This was an attack on democracy, and a clear demonstration of power from a growing and global alt-right terrorist movement. This was not just a collection of individuals upset at the result of the American election. It was an organized attack by extremists, fascists, and white supremacists.

Unfortunately, this is not unique to the United States. We must be vigilant, speak out against all forms of hate, and act decisively to combat fascism and racism in Canada. Just in the last year, we have seen how violently white supremacy operates in our systems, and is celebrated by some of my political colleagues. This is an immediate threat to our democracy and the safety of our country.

We are witnessing the dangers of extremism in real time and we should not underestimate this threat. We must act with hope, joy, and peace to combat it. It is therefore critical that we address clear human rights violations, and continue fighting for dignity, justice, and security for all persons.

Work to right wrongs will never cease

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Preview

Work to right wrongs will never cease

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Monday, Dec. 28, 2020

For most individuals,  this time of year is filled with family and community gatherings.  Along with the many recognized religious and cultural holidays, it is also the darkest month of the year, and closeness with loved ones and friends can bring comfort and warmth.

This year, many of us are missing these moments of togetherness, which is why it is important that we work together to fight isolation and keep our networks of community care going safely, including better supporting members of the shelterless community.

That is why, on Dec. 9, I put forward a unanimous consent Motion calling on members of Parliament to vote in favour of the critical actions required to deal with the housing crisis that has worsened during the pandemic.

This included increasing support for individuals who are chronically unhoused and an Urban Indigenous Housing strategy led by Indigenous people. I am pleased to report that my motion passed with unanimous consent.

Monday, Dec. 28, 2020

For most individuals,  this time of year is filled with family and community gatherings.  Along with the many recognized religious and cultural holidays, it is also the darkest month of the year, and closeness with loved ones and friends can bring comfort and warmth.

This year, many of us are missing these moments of togetherness, which is why it is important that we work together to fight isolation and keep our networks of community care going safely, including better supporting members of the shelterless community.

That is why, on Dec. 9, I put forward a unanimous consent Motion calling on members of Parliament to vote in favour of the critical actions required to deal with the housing crisis that has worsened during the pandemic.

This included increasing support for individuals who are chronically unhoused and an Urban Indigenous Housing strategy led by Indigenous people. I am pleased to report that my motion passed with unanimous consent.

Work to right wrongs will never cease

Leah Gazan - MP for Winnipeg Centre 3 minute read Preview

Work to right wrongs will never cease

Leah Gazan - MP for Winnipeg Centre 3 minute read Monday, Dec. 28, 2020

For most individuals, this time of year is filled with family and community gatherings. Along with the many recognized religious and cultural holidays, it is also the darkest month of the year, and closeness with loved ones and friends can bring comfort and warmth.

This year, many of us are missing these moments of togetherness, which is why it is important that we work together to fight isolation and keep our networks of community care going safely, including better supporting members of the shelterless community.

That is why, on Dec. 9, I put forward a unanimous consent motion calling on members of Parliament to vote in favour of the critical actions required to deal with the housing crisis that has worsened during the pandemic.

This included increasing support for individuals who are chronically unhoused and an Urban Indigenous Housing strategy led by Indigenous people. I am pleased to report that my motion passed with unanimous consent.

Monday, Dec. 28, 2020

For most individuals, this time of year is filled with family and community gatherings. Along with the many recognized religious and cultural holidays, it is also the darkest month of the year, and closeness with loved ones and friends can bring comfort and warmth.

This year, many of us are missing these moments of togetherness, which is why it is important that we work together to fight isolation and keep our networks of community care going safely, including better supporting members of the shelterless community.

That is why, on Dec. 9, I put forward a unanimous consent motion calling on members of Parliament to vote in favour of the critical actions required to deal with the housing crisis that has worsened during the pandemic.

This included increasing support for individuals who are chronically unhoused and an Urban Indigenous Housing strategy led by Indigenous people. I am pleased to report that my motion passed with unanimous consent.

Time for people over profit

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Preview

Time for people over profit

Leah Gazan 2 minute read Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2020

The pandemic has been difficult for most of us. My neighbours are suffering every day, with many individuals and families in Winnipeg Centre facing increased food insecurity, housing and work unpredictability. The supports provided have been exclusionary and inadequate, while some have been left behind completely.

But for the wealthiest in Canada, COVID-19 has proven to be very profitable. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives recently found that the 20 wealthiest people in the country amassed $37 billion in profits during the first six months of the pandemic. The Thomson and Weston families top that list.

Despite being one of the largest COVID-19 profiteers, Galen Weston, the chairman of Loblaws, recently ended the pay premium provided to front-line grocery store workers at the start of the pandemic. This is abhorrent, and yet another example of how we are not “all in this together” as the current government has claimed; corporations are profiting off this crisis, while many are forced deeper into poverty.  

We know that for many of our neighbours, following public health guidelines is impossible because they cannot access housing.

Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2020

The pandemic has been difficult for most of us. My neighbours are suffering every day, with many individuals and families in Winnipeg Centre facing increased food insecurity, housing and work unpredictability. The supports provided have been exclusionary and inadequate, while some have been left behind completely.

But for the wealthiest in Canada, COVID-19 has proven to be very profitable. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives recently found that the 20 wealthiest people in the country amassed $37 billion in profits during the first six months of the pandemic. The Thomson and Weston families top that list.

Despite being one of the largest COVID-19 profiteers, Galen Weston, the chairman of Loblaws, recently ended the pay premium provided to front-line grocery store workers at the start of the pandemic. This is abhorrent, and yet another example of how we are not “all in this together” as the current government has claimed; corporations are profiting off this crisis, while many are forced deeper into poverty.  

We know that for many of our neighbours, following public health guidelines is impossible because they cannot access housing.

Take profit out of long-term care

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Preview

Take profit out of long-term care

Leah Gazan 3 minute read Friday, Nov. 6, 2020

This month, our worst fears surrounding long-term care homes during the COVID-19 pandemic came true in our community of Winnipeg Centre.

As I write this, more than 20 lives have been taken at Parkview Place Care Centre, a long-term care home, as result of a COVID-19 outbreak and the for-profit facility being ill-equipped for a pandemic. At the time of writing, more than 40 per cent of seniors at the home had tested positive for the virus.

The complete disregard for seniors and other residents, including disabled persons, during the COVID-19 pandemic has been a national tragedy. Over 80 per cent of COVID-19 deaths in Canada have been linked to long-term care homes, which is proportionally one of the highest in the world. Unsurprisingly, the largest gap in care has been noted in privately run care homes. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives has reported that ,since 1995, higher rates of hospitalization have been

found in for-profit homes in Manitoba in comparison to non-profit and public care homes.This does not have to do with the failure of front-line workers who are doing their best to care for residents, rather a result of decades of underfunding by provincial and federal governments, often resulting in understaffed and under-resourced long-term care facilities. The shameful lack of value governments have shown for seniors and disabled persons must end.

Friday, Nov. 6, 2020

This month, our worst fears surrounding long-term care homes during the COVID-19 pandemic came true in our community of Winnipeg Centre.

As I write this, more than 20 lives have been taken at Parkview Place Care Centre, a long-term care home, as result of a COVID-19 outbreak and the for-profit facility being ill-equipped for a pandemic. At the time of writing, more than 40 per cent of seniors at the home had tested positive for the virus.

The complete disregard for seniors and other residents, including disabled persons, during the COVID-19 pandemic has been a national tragedy. Over 80 per cent of COVID-19 deaths in Canada have been linked to long-term care homes, which is proportionally one of the highest in the world. Unsurprisingly, the largest gap in care has been noted in privately run care homes. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives has reported that ,since 1995, higher rates of hospitalization have been

found in for-profit homes in Manitoba in comparison to non-profit and public care homes.This does not have to do with the failure of front-line workers who are doing their best to care for residents, rather a result of decades of underfunding by provincial and federal governments, often resulting in understaffed and under-resourced long-term care facilities. The shameful lack of value governments have shown for seniors and disabled persons must end.

We need a guaranteed basic income

By Leah Gazan 2 minute read Preview

We need a guaranteed basic income

By Leah Gazan 2 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020

As the COVID-19 pandemic persists, I am hearing from more and more families and individuals in Winnipeg Centre who are in a financial crisis.

Individuals are becoming more worried by the day about where their next meal will come from, or whether they will be able to pay their rent next month. During a time of pandemic, individuals need to know that they will be looked after. This is a health and safety issue. We must adhere to Health Canada’s guidelines, which recommend physical distancing and frequent hand washing is the best defence against COVID-19; this requires a home and access to clean drinking water.

That is why I submitted a Private Member’s Motion, M-46, on Aug. 10, which called for the replacement of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) with a permanent Guaranteed Livable Basic Income (GLBI).

It is critical that all persons living in Canada are afforded respect, dignity, and security of their person; this means making investments to ensure basic human rights for all. As a member of Parliament, I took an oath to uphold the Canadian Constitution and Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Motion 46 is consistent with this. Governing is about choices and I choose people.

Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020

As the COVID-19 pandemic persists, I am hearing from more and more families and individuals in Winnipeg Centre who are in a financial crisis.

Individuals are becoming more worried by the day about where their next meal will come from, or whether they will be able to pay their rent next month. During a time of pandemic, individuals need to know that they will be looked after. This is a health and safety issue. We must adhere to Health Canada’s guidelines, which recommend physical distancing and frequent hand washing is the best defence against COVID-19; this requires a home and access to clean drinking water.

That is why I submitted a Private Member’s Motion, M-46, on Aug. 10, which called for the replacement of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) with a permanent Guaranteed Livable Basic Income (GLBI).

It is critical that all persons living in Canada are afforded respect, dignity, and security of their person; this means making investments to ensure basic human rights for all. As a member of Parliament, I took an oath to uphold the Canadian Constitution and Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Motion 46 is consistent with this. Governing is about choices and I choose people.

Let’s keep on keeping safe in Manitoba

By Leah Gazan 2 minute read Preview

Let’s keep on keeping safe in Manitoba

By Leah Gazan 2 minute read Monday, Aug. 10, 2020

This past July, I drove from Winnipeg to Ottawa to sit in the House of Commons. I had pressing questions I needed to ask, regarding individuals being cut off from CERB, the failure of the current Liberal government to adequately support small businesses, and adequate support needed by students, seniors, and persons with disabilities.

Now this is not a short drive, but I felt that the risks of flying and having to be in airports was far too great. So, I decided to jump in my car and drive 4,300 kilometres to Ottawa and return to Winnipeg.

It was a worthwhile trip. I was able to ask my questions in the House of Commons and have followed up my questions with letters to the ministers. I feel steadfast in my commitment to fight for what our community deserves, even if it means driving across the country to do so.

Upon my return, I decided to go for a COVID-19 test. Although I did not have any symptoms, as an essential service provider I wanted to ensure that I was safe for our community. With many individuals being tested, I could not help but think about all the front-line health-care providers, who are overworked, administering the same test over and over. I made sure to thank them for their sacrifice. They are going above and beyond to care for our community. We must do our part to keep numbers low as to not further burden health-care teams in Manitoba. I am pleased to report that my test came out negative for COVID-19 and that the number of overall COVID-19 cases in Manitoba continues to remain low.

Monday, Aug. 10, 2020

This past July, I drove from Winnipeg to Ottawa to sit in the House of Commons. I had pressing questions I needed to ask, regarding individuals being cut off from CERB, the failure of the current Liberal government to adequately support small businesses, and adequate support needed by students, seniors, and persons with disabilities.

Now this is not a short drive, but I felt that the risks of flying and having to be in airports was far too great. So, I decided to jump in my car and drive 4,300 kilometres to Ottawa and return to Winnipeg.

It was a worthwhile trip. I was able to ask my questions in the House of Commons and have followed up my questions with letters to the ministers. I feel steadfast in my commitment to fight for what our community deserves, even if it means driving across the country to do so.

Upon my return, I decided to go for a COVID-19 test. Although I did not have any symptoms, as an essential service provider I wanted to ensure that I was safe for our community. With many individuals being tested, I could not help but think about all the front-line health-care providers, who are overworked, administering the same test over and over. I made sure to thank them for their sacrifice. They are going above and beyond to care for our community. We must do our part to keep numbers low as to not further burden health-care teams in Manitoba. I am pleased to report that my test came out negative for COVID-19 and that the number of overall COVID-19 cases in Manitoba continues to remain low.