Louise Hedman

Louise Hedman

Transcona community correspondent

Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona.

Recent articles of Louise Hedman

Beware the Instagram hackers

Louise Hedman 3 minute read Preview

Beware the Instagram hackers

Louise Hedman 3 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 1, 2022

The stories are everywhere; tales of how people are duped into succumbing to scams or fraud, whether through online romance sites, Instagram, Facebook, multiple emails in your inbox or those annoying phone calls for those who still have land line phones (and many who don’t).

For the most part people are savvy to the fraudsters and either hang up or block them. But the hackers seem to be getting more sophisticated, and they are so good at pulling at people’s heartstrings or circumventing their better judgment. It appears our best strategy may just be to trust no one, and thus take no risk. We can no longer have a land-line phone without screening every call. No one under the age of 50 will ever answer it anyway.

Lately there have been numerous reports of Instagram accounts being hacked and taken over by who knows who and then being used to solicit the account’s followers to purchase bitcoin or other fabulous things for sale. The hackers will send requests through Messenger accounts and offer a convincing story that the account holder is making the request. Most people will double-check through other means but not always — and that’s how they get you. A recent CBC news story told of an account whose hackers even used the account-holder’s personal photos to promote adult content.

When your account is hacked, you can try to change the password or get multiple access codes to re-enter, but these methods often do not work, and it is truly impossible to contact Meta to have it corrected. You can email them every day to no avail. When they respond they will tell you they are too busy to help you at this time and instruct you try again later. Meanwhile, your name and your account are being used as a fraudulent tool to fool people into believing you are soliciting things that don’t fit the profile of your account or promoting that doesn’t represent your beliefs or values.

Wednesday, Jun. 1, 2022

The stories are everywhere; tales of how people are duped into succumbing to scams or fraud, whether through online romance sites, Instagram, Facebook, multiple emails in your inbox or those annoying phone calls for those who still have land line phones (and many who don’t).

For the most part people are savvy to the fraudsters and either hang up or block them. But the hackers seem to be getting more sophisticated, and they are so good at pulling at people’s heartstrings or circumventing their better judgment. It appears our best strategy may just be to trust no one, and thus take no risk. We can no longer have a land-line phone without screening every call. No one under the age of 50 will ever answer it anyway.

Lately there have been numerous reports of Instagram accounts being hacked and taken over by who knows who and then being used to solicit the account’s followers to purchase bitcoin or other fabulous things for sale. The hackers will send requests through Messenger accounts and offer a convincing story that the account holder is making the request. Most people will double-check through other means but not always — and that’s how they get you. A recent CBC news story told of an account whose hackers even used the account-holder’s personal photos to promote adult content.

When your account is hacked, you can try to change the password or get multiple access codes to re-enter, but these methods often do not work, and it is truly impossible to contact Meta to have it corrected. You can email them every day to no avail. When they respond they will tell you they are too busy to help you at this time and instruct you try again later. Meanwhile, your name and your account are being used as a fraudulent tool to fool people into believing you are soliciting things that don’t fit the profile of your account or promoting that doesn’t represent your beliefs or values.

The true meaning of ‘team’

Louise Hedman 3 minute read Preview

The true meaning of ‘team’

Louise Hedman 3 minute read Wednesday, Apr. 20, 2022

The feeling of belonging to something is huge for the psyche. It enables people to feel purpose and hope, and attaining a goal after working hard on physical and mental improvement is what makes the journey worthwhile.

The Canadian ringette championships were held from April 3 to 9 in Calgary, Alta. Ringette athletes, coaches and officials from across Canada converged to compete at an elite level and to encourage sportsmanship and visibility of the sport. The tournament determined Canadian champions in the U16AA, U19AA and National Ringette League categories.

Being part of the AA ringette world is one of the best life experiences our family has had. The girls are proof that they can be nurtured and evolve into young women who have learned to physically endure pain and injury but still push themselves to the limit in order to achieve a goal. Proof they do actually listen to adults who are there to guide them through the obstacles. (Go figure.) Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, our team was faced with ice and dryland training restrictions but endured to earn its spots at the national championship.

That their coaches donated their time and talent to teach these young girls is appreciated to an extent that words and gifts can’t express. They reinforced the fact that these girls are genuinely cared about, which is huge for impressionable young women. They encouraged the achievements and gently critiqued the mistakes (even if their inner voices were screaming.) Overall, the U19AA coaches this year were great and we are very sad to see them move on. (Insert tears here.)

Wednesday, Apr. 20, 2022

U16AA ringette teams from Manitoba and British Columbia bonded during the Canadian ringette championships in Calgary earlier this month.

An expression of frustration

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Preview

An expression of frustration

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Saturday, Feb. 19, 2022

Society is a collection of all types. There are those who understand the rules and laws and abide by them, there are those and those who were never taught or who refuse to obey our rules and law. There are also those who will stop at nothing to prove a point or to show their muscle for personal satisfaction and to achieve what they feel they deserve. Whether it’s kids at school who gang together to harass and intimidate chosen targets; workplace bullies who use their devious skills to move up the ladder; or people in the streets who try and intimidate and harass. Documentaries, research and real-life situations are out there for societies to learn from, but it seems nothing ever changes.  School divisions turn a blind eye and tell parents bullying doesn’t exist. Parents believe their children would never behave in that manner. Yet there real-life teenage suicides related to bullying all the time.  Now we have groups causing school lockdowns by showing up and banging on windows and shouting out their cause, as happened in Steinbach a couple of weeks. Truly unfathomable.  Recent “rallies” in multiple cities across Canada and the world are a fine example of bullying. Do these people feel good about themselves, forcing innocent people to stay home from work, depriving them of a good night’s sleep or for just trying to survive after a global pandemic has changed life as we knew it. These bullies are holding people hostage against their will. The last time I checked, that was against the law. We have elections and laws for a reason — to maintain the peaceful co-existence of society. Fringe groups such as this should not be able to dictate how they think things should be.  Many believe governments need to bring in the big guys and arrest, impose fines, impound, evaluate and withhold licenses to regain law and order. These senseless acts of defiance are affecting all of us in one way or another.We get your point - you don’t want to get vaccinated, you don’t want to wear masks, you want to be able to do whatever you want whenever you want and you hate being told what to do. You want ‘freedom.’  In case you haven’t noticed, Canada is one of the freest countries in the world. We have fair elections; all people have access to education, the freedom to obtain employment, to purchase homes or goods, to play, to travel, etc. We already have freedom. The majority understands that when a killer virus descends upon the earth, special rules have to be made to protect the population. Yes, it’s been going on a long time and we are tired of it but if everyone had done their parts when asked, this may have been over long ago. Stop degrading our Canadian flag and let us be proud of it once again.    Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

Society is a collection of all types. 

There are those who understand the rules and laws and abide by them, there are those and those who were never taught or who refuse to obey our rules and law. There are also those who will stop at nothing to prove a point or to show their muscle for personal satisfaction and to achieve what they feel they deserve. 

Whether it’s kids at school who gang together to harass and intimidate chosen targets; workplace bullies who use their devious skills to move up the ladder; or people in the streets who try and intimidate and harass. 

Saturday, Feb. 19, 2022

Daniel Crump / Winnipeg Free Pre
Correspondent Louise Hedman has found protests like the one at the Manitoba Legislature to be extremely frustrating.

Enjoy our winter wonderland

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Preview

Enjoy our winter wonderland

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2022

Many people dread the change of seasons from summer to fall and then to winter.  Others embrace the sights of multi-coloured leaves, the smell of the forest floor and then the crisp, beautiful white landscape and activities not offered in summer months.Winnipeg and the surrounding area never ceases to amaze me with how engaged people and communities are when it comes to fun things to do in the winter.  The Forks offers the awesome Nestaweya River Trail,peppered with imaginative art for people to enjoy while spending time outdoors.  This year the addition of snow bikes is sure to attract people to participate in something new.  Our multiple community centres offer outdoor rinks for beginners learning to skate or for playing a fun game of ringette or hockey with friends. Some communities have come together to create neighbourhood rinks or ponds for people of all ages to enjoy without going too far from home.We have a few (small) ski hills within a short distance of the city where beginners to advanced skiers can enjoy a day practising or learning skills. There are cross country ski trails and multiple walking trails in every neighborhood. Our provincial parks are gems within a short driving distance where one can cross country ski, hike, cycle or just hang out with friends surrounded by the silence of the forest.  For those of you who are brave enough to bundle up and get out that door, the end result of fresh air and a change of scenery can be a life-changer in this world of uncertainty and isolation. Here are a few online sites that suggest winter outdoor activities and every region offer a tourism site with local suggestions:• www.travelmanitoba.com;• www.centrtalmbtourism.com;• www.particpaction.com Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

Many people dread the change of seasons from summer to fall and then to winter.  

Others embrace the sights of multi-coloured leaves, the smell of the forest floor and then the crisp, beautiful white landscape and activities not offered in summer months.

Winnipeg and the surrounding area never ceases to amaze me with how engaged people and communities are when it comes to fun things to do in the winter.  The Forks offers the awesome Nestaweya River Trail, peppered with imaginative art for people to enjoy while spending time outdoors.  This year the addition of snow bikes is sure to attract people to participate in something new.  

Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2022

Sheldon Birnie
Skaters, cyclists, pedestrians and more of all ages have been enjoying the Nestaweya River Trail. At press time, the trail stretched from Hugo Street on the Assiniboine River to the Manitoba Canoe & Kayak Centre at 80 Churchill Dr.

Transcona says farewell to an old friend

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Preview

Transcona says farewell to an old friend

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Friday, Oct. 8, 2021

 

I heard through the grapevine that D & S Auto Service had been sold. I stopped by to confirm and sure enough there was a steady stream of cars filled with longtime friends, customers, family and those who considered them family who had come to say their goodbyes.  Some had been friends with Dave Hrynchuk from way back when he started, 45 years ago.  All were reminiscing about how they had enjoyed bringing their vehicles there, how they enjoyed the conversations and became teary-eyed and emotional while saying their goodbyes.  I had to wait my turn to have a chat, and Dave obliged me. He had been floating the idea of selling for a few years and when the opportunity came along he finally took the leap to retirement. I wrote an article a while back about a secret Transcona place, and now the location has been revealed.  D & S Service has been the heart of the 100 block of Regent Avenue West for over 4 decades. My husband took his first vehicle to the D & S shop at 122 Regent when he was just a teenager, thus beginning the long relationship our family has had with Dave and his brothers, Steve and Jack. They have served multiple generations over the years.Dave was always smiling, always pleasant and would always fit you in. The shop may not have been pretty but you would always receive great service at an affordable price.  You could stop in for a chat and a coffee or drop off some food or drink as a show of appreciation. The back room was a gathering space for a coffee and some laughs.  The phone wasn’t answered often but that would be the signal they were busy and you had to drop by.  It will be a sad day when we can no longer say,:“Just bring it to D & S”.  I happened to be there when one of Dave’s friends brought his vehicle by for a look, which made for the great photo that I am sharing here. Some people will now be lost for where to go for vehicle repairs or a simple tire plug, especially the older generation, who have relied on them for so long. What will my mom do when she can no longer visit with “Dave” every couple of weeks?  I have suggested to Dave that the D & S community gathers once per month for a Dine with Dave event. A different local restaurant location can be chosen, which will continue support of our local businesses while allowing all those who miss the great chats and laughs to continue.   If you haven’t already, take a walk or drive and say your goodbyes before the doors roll down on this great Transcona business.   Thank you, Dave, Jack and Dennis for everything you brought to our little community. Other tributes can be seen on the Transcona, And Proud of It Facebook group.Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona.  

I heard through the grapevine that D & S Auto Service had been sold. I stopped by to confirm and sure enough there was a steady stream of cars filled with longtime friends, customers, family and those who considered them family who had come to say their goodbyes.  

Some had been friends with Dave Hrynchuk from way back when he started, 45 years ago.  All were reminiscing about how they had enjoyed bringing their vehicles there, how they enjoyed the conversations and became teary-eyed and emotional while saying their goodbyes.  

Friday, Oct. 8, 2021

Photo by Louise Hedman
Dave Hrynchuk (right) and Fred Wilson II at D & S Auto Service admire a customer’s classic car. Many in Transcona will miss the shop, which has been sold and will soon close for good.

Preserving our history

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Preview

Preserving our history

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Saturday, Sep. 4, 2021

Most people who have resided in the Transcona area or travel here regularly know of the 2747 train engine which rests just east of Plessis Road in the Rotary Park.  In April of 1926, the 2747 was the first steam engine locomotive to be built at the CN shops in Transcona.  The Transcona Museum acquired the engine in 2015 and alongside volunteers, board members, staff and community members, has begun working on the restoration process. Now that the engine itself has been restored, the next step is to offer protection from the elements in order to offer a safe and inviting space for all to enjoy it.   A capital campaign has been launched to raise funds for a permanent enclosure surrounding the engine.  To date, the museum has raised approximately one half of the required funds and is reaching out to the community to keep the campaign going.  The Transcona Museum will be hosting a Doors Open event at the engine on Sept. 11 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. where the gates will be open for the public to view the engine, take pictures and check out the progress that has been made on the restoration. No one will be permitted to enter the engine or climb on it at this time. The museum will be hosting a similar event on Sat., Sept. 25 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. (weather permitting) for Culture Days.  There will be information and a full display on the capital campaign and preliminary design of the enclosure. The public will have the opportunity to offer comments on the design. There will also be an artifact signing over of components originally from the CN2747 that the Winnipeg Railway Museum has located in its collection and will be donating to the Transcona Museum and the 2747. If the weather does not co-operate, the signing over will be moved to the Transcona Museum. All COVID regulations will be followed for both events and the public will be required to wear masks inside the fenced area.  More information can be found through the Transcona Museum website at www.transconamuseum.mb.ca or www.transconamuseum.mb.ca/get-on-boardLouise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

Most people who have resided in the Transcona area or travel here regularly know of the 2747 train engine which rests just east of Plessis Road in the Rotary Park.  

In April of 1926, the 2747 was the first steam engine locomotive to be built at the CN shops in Transcona.  The Transcona Museum acquired the engine in 2015 and alongside volunteers, board members, staff and community members, has begun working on the restoration process. Now that the engine itself has been restored, the next step is to offer protection from the elements in order to offer a safe and inviting space for all to enjoy it.   

A capital campaign has been launched to raise funds for a permanent enclosure surrounding the engine.  To date, the museum has raised approximately one half of the required funds and is reaching out to the community to keep the campaign going.  

Saturday, Sep. 4, 2021

Image supplied by Thomas Design Builders Ltd.
An artist’s rendering shows a design for a permanent enclosure for the Transcona Museum’s 2747 train engine.

South Transcona CC offers plenty

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Preview

South Transcona CC offers plenty

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2021

Some people have never discovered this place, while others are familiar.  The South Transcona Community Centre sits in a beautiful park setting, nestled between Webster Avenue, Borden Avenue and Copeland Street in south Transcona.The centre goes way back to the early 1960s, when community members came together to create a space for neighbourhood families to gather and play. Since its inception there have been many changes to the facility and words can’t say enough to thank the countless volunteers who help keep it operating.  Owing to its location, getting here is limited to vehicle or access via the South Transcona walking trail. Times have changed and families have become quite busy with the hustle and bustle of daily life. Families don’t seem to have the spare time to just go and hang out at the club, to help fix a broken board or organize a random game of hockey. However, the past 18 months have shown us how that there still are families out there who enjoy the facility when time is abundant. The outdoor rink was used more this past winter than any time we can remember.  Hockey and ringette teams actually came out to practise outdoors. What?   An excellent group of volunteers manually flooded and maintained the ice surface for all to enjoy, all while thoroughly enjoying the process. The weather, of course, plays a huge role in how long the ice will last; with manual equipment it becomes even more difficult.Summer use of the outdoor rink is now in full swing for rollerblading and ball hockey and, of course, our wading pool is open Tuesday to Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. There are three brand new basketball hoops and backboards, and a large pickleball court (equipment is available upon request).  The centre itself has also been fully renovated and includes a fully accessible ramp on the exterior, three brand new washrooms, a larger hall area, and large kitchen space.  The official grand opening was delayed due to unfortunate world events but will occur in the near future. A classic car show-and -shine event is being planned for this fall, so stay tuned.  Now that the space is new again the centre is looking to attract user groups who may find it suitable to run fitness, art or cooking classes or other fun and educational events. The centre also looks forward to continuing annual events such as family fun day, breakfast with Santa, the night of lights, quiz night, and it is considering the addition of bingo and movie nights into the mix.  New board members are needed who are dedicated to go forward with passion to create, attract and maintain this great little club.   If you are interested in keeping on top of the events or renting the facility you can visit the website at www.southtranscona.com Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona and president of the South Transcona Community Centre.

Some people have never discovered this place, while others are familiar.  

The South Transcona Community Centre sits in a beautiful park setting, nestled between Webster Avenue, Borden Avenue and Copeland Street in south Transcona.

The centre goes way back to the early 1960s, when community members came together to create a space for neighbourhood families to gather and play. Since its inception there have been many changes to the facility and words can’t say enough to thank the countless volunteers who help keep it operating.  

Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2021

Photo by Sheldon Birnie
Louise Hedman, pictured above in 2017, invites one and all to come and enjoy what the South Transcona Community Centre has to offer.

Development raises questions with residents

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Preview

Development raises questions with residents

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Friday, Feb. 19, 2021

 

A new industrial development has been proposed within the R.M. of Springfield for a section of land directly south of the Greater Winnipeg Water District Railway and Aqueduct.  Some of the area residents have been present at two online Zoom meetings hosted by Waterside Development at which it has presented reports on ground water management, traffic studies and possible layout and usages for the park. The No. 1 concern of residents is the projected increase of large-truck traffic on Plessis Road North and South and the dangers associated with it. Plessis Road is a two-lane asphalt roadway with skinny gravel shoulders and deep sloping ditches. Its original purpose was not to accommodate continuous semi-trailer traffic to and from the CN Intermodal terminal or become a main transportation hub for business. The proposed development would have no roadway access other than Plessis Road which lies within the City of Winnipeg and is maintained by the City of Winnipeg public works department. The main tenant on this roadway is CN Intermodal, which was pushed into the community of Transcona in 2002 by the city council and executive policy committee at the time. The reasoning was that it would reduce trucking activity on Kenaston Boulevard, reduce vehicular delays at the Kenaston mainline crossing and Wilkes spur, and reduce the cost of a future underpass at Kenaston Boulevard. At the time, the residents of South Tuxedo expressed concerns of excessive noise related to train activity associated with the facility. CN was awarded a grant in the amount of $220,000 to offset the property taxes at the Kenaston site which acted as an incentive to make the move. The residents of Transcona were not given any warning of this recommendation and all of a sudden the terminal was in our community.  At the time, CN had also indicated that they would use Fermor Avenue to access Plessis Road and the relocated terminal, therefore having minimal impact on the residential portion of Plessis north of the terminal. But that’s not what has happened.Since the new neighbors moved in, there have been many accidents and close calls in the residential neighborhood of Plessis Road South, not to mention ongoing road rage expressed at residents.  There is a hope that the proposed development will shine a much needed spotlight on the ongoing struggles of the residents of Plessis Road and surrounding areas and how the increased truck traffic in our community is a danger to all when the roadways are not properly equipped.   This issue also highlights the fact that there is friction between residents of existing residential neighborhoods within city limits when a bordering rural municipality explores development right on its boundary with the city. On one side of the boundary, residents pay a premium in property taxes and the environmental rules may differ within 50 feet of one another.  More info on this proposed development can be found at www.plessiscommercial.ca Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona.  

A new industrial development has been proposed within the R.M. of Springfield for a section of land directly south of the Greater Winnipeg Water District Railway and Aqueduct.  

Some of the area residents have been present at two online Zoom meetings hosted by Waterside Development at which it has presented reports on ground water management, traffic studies and possible layout and usages for the park. 

Friday, Feb. 19, 2021

Supplied image
A proposed commercial development in the R.M. of Springfield is a concern for nearby Transcona residents.

Finding hope for 2021 in little and big things

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Preview

Finding hope for 2021 in little and big things

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2020

As we near the end of the year, we are all hopeful that 2021 will offer optimism for a near-normal existence.  Although some countries have experienced devastating health issues and rampant disease, never before has the entire world been in a pandemic at the same time. As I look around me I wonder what other people are thinking as they go about their meeting their basic needs — are they coping with life as we now know it, are they suffering from depression or is there no difference in their lives. All are wearing masks, most keep their distance and most are abiding by the rules set out to protect us.  Sadness, loneliness and depression are on the rise and I can clearly see why. It is more apparent than ever that most people need other people to feel alive and to function in society. Family members suddenly become closer now that we cannot see them anymore. All those disagreements seem trivial now.  A funny thing happened in Transcona recently. There was a tremendous buzz over the new Wendy’s restaurant located at the corner of Regent Avenue East and Plessis Road. It was almost as if someone important was coming to town. Everywhere you went people were talking about it.“When it will ?” was the common question.  The lot on which it sits has sat empty for many, many years, concrete overrun with weeds and an old chain link fence leaning to the left. I tried to understand the hype and began to think it must represent a glimmer of hope in these terrible times. People have been going about their daily routines with nothing to look forward to and this was a little thing that made them feel good.  On opening day the traffic jams began, a line of cars looped around the building and onto the street with at least a one-hour wait before they could leave. People didn’t care; they were just thrilled there was somewhere they could visit with Frosties flying, burgers grilling and bank accounts dwindling.  In the end they were happy, and Transcona welcomes Wendy’s back to the neighborhood.  The New Year will be great. There is hope on the horizon with vaccines rolling out and case numbers falling. Winter has been kind so far and spring is not that far away. If we can all just hang in there, as the old cat poster use to say, we can make it through.   To all you young people out there, we feel for you, this is not nice and we can see how you are affected. Try to think of it as just a blip in time that will eventually move forward and never be spoken of again. The lesson you can take away is that friends are super-important and shouldn’t be taken for granted because you need each other, now more than ever. Your parents are also way more important than your friends because they made you and love you to the moon and back.  So although home life can be stressful right now, be nice to everyone. Happy holidays to all. Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

As we near the end of the year, we are all hopeful that 2021 will offer optimism for a near-normal existence.  

Although some countries have experienced devastating health issues and rampant disease, never before has the entire world been in a pandemic at the same time.

 As I look around me I wonder what other people are thinking as they go about their meeting their basic needs — are they coping with life as we now know it, are they suffering from depression or is there no difference in their lives. All are wearing masks, most keep their distance and most are abiding by the rules set out to protect us.  

Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2020

As we near the end of the year, we are all hopeful that 2021 will offer optimism for a near-normal existence.  Although some countries have experienced devastating health issues and rampant disease, never before has the entire world been in a pandemic at the same time. As I look around me I wonder what other people are thinking as they go about their meeting their basic needs — are they coping with life as we now know it, are they suffering from depression or is there no difference in their lives. All are wearing masks, most keep their distance and most are abiding by the rules set out to protect us.  Sadness, loneliness and depression are on the rise and I can clearly see why. It is more apparent than ever that most people need other people to feel alive and to function in society. Family members suddenly become closer now that we cannot see them anymore. All those disagreements seem trivial now.  A funny thing happened in Transcona recently. There was a tremendous buzz over the new Wendy’s restaurant located at the corner of Regent Avenue East and Plessis Road. It was almost as if someone important was coming to town. Everywhere you went people were talking about it.“When it will ?” was the common question.  The lot on which it sits has sat empty for many, many years, concrete overrun with weeds and an old chain link fence leaning to the left. I tried to understand the hype and began to think it must represent a glimmer of hope in these terrible times. People have been going about their daily routines with nothing to look forward to and this was a little thing that made them feel good.  On opening day the traffic jams began, a line of cars looped around the building and onto the street with at least a one-hour wait before they could leave. People didn’t care; they were just thrilled there was somewhere they could visit with Frosties flying, burgers grilling and bank accounts dwindling.  In the end they were happy, and Transcona welcomes Wendy’s back to the neighborhood.  The New Year will be great. There is hope on the horizon with vaccines rolling out and case numbers falling. Winter has been kind so far and spring is not that far away. If we can all just hang in there, as the old cat poster use to say, we can make it through.   To all you young people out there, we feel for you, this is not nice and we can see how you are affected. Try to think of it as just a blip in time that will eventually move forward and never be spoken of again. The lesson you can take away is that friends are super-important and shouldn’t be taken for granted because you need each other, now more than ever. Your parents are also way more important than your friends because they made you and love you to the moon and back.  So although home life can be stressful right now, be nice to everyone. Happy holidays to all. Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

As we near the end of the year, we are all hopeful that 2021 will offer optimism for a near-normal existence.  

Although some countries have experienced devastating health issues and rampant disease, never before has the entire world been in a pandemic at the same time.

 As I look around me I wonder what other people are thinking as they go about their meeting their basic needs — are they coping with life as we now know it, are they suffering from depression or is there no difference in their lives. All are wearing masks, most keep their distance and most are abiding by the rules set out to protect us.  

South Transcona’s ‘path to nowhere’

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Preview

South Transcona’s ‘path to nowhere’

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Friday, Oct. 2, 2020

As I explore the City of Winnipeg and its various walking or cycling paths, I find myself comparing them to the path closest to my home.It’s called the South Transcona community path and runs north of South Transcona from Borden Avenue to Terracon Place, close to the Dugald Road overpass. The condition of this path does not compare to that of any of the other paths I have been on and requires careful attention when walking or riding on it. There are multiple trip-and-fall hazards all along the way. I have nicknamed it the “forgotten path to nowhere.” In the past a sidewalk or path did not exist in this location and residents would enter Transcona either by walking or biking through the Transcona CN shops and the midway. The entry point was at the edge of a concrete parking lot west of the malt plant and the exit point was at Pandora Avenue and Bond Street. This right-of-way passage had been in place for over 80 years until the CN was sold.  At that point the company’s management, citing insurance reasons, tried to justify its closure by saying it was extremely dangerous for anyone to cross through it property.  A tall fence was erected, shutting off access.  With limited access to this neighborhood via transit or by vehicle it is nice to have the option of riding a bicycle or walking to the other side. The issue we are facing is that the South Transcona community path only heads west. Junior high or high school students heading east are restricted to riding dangerously on a sloped gravel shoulder alongside vehicles travelling 80 km/h, or they have to head west and add another 20 to 30 minutes to their travel time. I have made inquiries about whether the path will continue on to the east and have been told each time that it’s not going to happen. With the new neighborhood adjacent to Ravenhurst Street, a new bike/walking path has been laid and a controlled crossing will be installed at the tracks. But that is where the “path to nowhere” will end. No connection to South Transcona, no destination to anywhere but the ditch.   Val Cousineau of the Transcona Trails Association says community members have been advocating for a South Transcona trail extension to join at Ravenhurst but there have been no new updates.  In the past few years many new pieces of trail have been put in by developers. The Trails Association is very happy to see the developer has built the trail along Ravenhurst, which improves the cycle route connection to South Transcona. This new section of trail will be an extension of the Pandora Pathway.   So while all the neighborhoods around us, whether old or new, enjoy their beautifully landscaped paths, we will continue to use the only bumpy little path that joins us to the world on the other side. It’s dangerous but functional and we should just shut up and be thankful we don’t have to walk on the shoulder while getting sprayed with gravel or face death by being hit by a vehicle.  Hopefully our time will come. Soon. Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

As I explore the City of Winnipeg and its various walking or cycling paths, I find myself comparing them to the path closest to my home.

It’s called the South Transcona community path and runs north of South Transcona from Borden Avenue to Terracon Place, close to the Dugald Road overpass. The condition of this path does not compare to that of any of the other paths I have been on and requires careful attention when walking or riding on it. There are multiple trip-and-fall hazards all along the way. I have nicknamed it the “forgotten path to nowhere.” 

In the past a sidewalk or path did not exist in this location and residents would enter Transcona either by walking or biking through the Transcona CN shops and the midway. The entry point was at the edge of a concrete parking lot west of the malt plant and the exit point was at Pandora Avenue and Bond Street. 

Friday, Oct. 2, 2020

Louise Hedman
The state of the South Transcona community path (a.k.a. the "road to nowhere") leaves much to be desired.

Taking stock of modern life

Louise Hedman 3 minute read Preview

Taking stock of modern life

Louise Hedman 3 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020

As we move through our busy lives we may take for granted all the people and things around us.  

Not until we are faced with a major world event are we forced to step back and really look at what we have become and where we are in our lives. How have we been acting toward one another? Have we been paying attention to those who mean the most to us? Are we treating our friends with love and respect?  

I think we can all answer no to at least one of those.  

It seems our families are the first to suffer our selfish disregard. They are ignored or pushed aside because they are always there, in the same room but invisible. Technology has also taken over this world with fancy apps and quick methods of communication —  eye candy if you will — that often seem more addictive than the usual vices. It’s funny how people can’t see how they are behaving, oblivious to reality.  

Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020

Photo by Louise Hedman
Meet Leo, a four-legged family member whose love is unconditional.

Spring is just around the corner, honest…

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Preview

Spring is just around the corner, honest…

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Thursday, Apr. 16, 2020

Spring appears to be having an ongoing argument with winter like every second day.  One day she will be the strong one and just push her way past him. Spring brings all things good, such as birds, flowers, grass, gardens and happiness. This spring there will be an overabundance of happiness. I’m betting there will be more people than ever planting gardens and getting out there in their yards to give them extra special care. Although we are normally excited to visit all the fabulous greenhouses our city has to offer, a curveball in the form of the COVID-19 pandemic has been thrown but that doesn’t mean those businesses are not open for business.    A quick online search reveals over 20 greenhouses and nurseries within city limits or close proximity to the Perimeter Highway.  After trying to make a few calls, I was directed to websites, Facebook and Instagram for the greenhouse shopping experience. Most greenhouses are advertising online sales with the option of curbside pickup. Some may even deliver. (I am uncertain what the big box stores have to offer in this regard.)  The one thing missing from the greenhouse shopping experience will be the overall feeling of peace when you walk into one  Instant serenity sweeps over you and transforms the next 30 minutes  — no wait, make that 60 minutes — into the best calming experience ever. Not everyone feels the same when they visit these stores, especially kids. They don’t enjoy being dragged into these places of greenery without toys. There usually has to be a bribe of some sort.  (Note to self: don’t bring the kids again.)    Some high schools are currently running fundraising campaigns selling gardening supplies and seeds to help fund their 2021 school trips. Check with a school near you for more information, as now is the time to start planning which vegetables we would like to experiment with, which flowers we love to look at and how we can help our winter-beaten yards look new again.  We will soon have a chance to immerse ourselves in the world of gardening to help ease the stress of the world. Happy spring.  Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

Spring appears to be having an ongoing argument with winter like every second day. 

One day she will be the strong one and just push her way past him. Spring brings all things good, such as birds, flowers, grass, gardens and happiness. This spring there will be an overabundance of happiness. I’m betting there will be more people than ever planting gardens and getting out there in their yards to give them extra special care. Although we are normally excited to visit all the fabulous greenhouses our city has to offer, a curveball in the form of the COVID-19 pandemic has been thrown but that doesn’t mean those businesses are not open for business.    

A quick online search reveals over 20 greenhouses and nurseries within city limits or close proximity to the Perimeter Highway. After trying to make a few calls, I was directed to websites, Facebook and Instagram for the greenhouse shopping experience. Most greenhouses are advertising online sales with the option of curbside pickup. Some may even deliver. (I am uncertain what the big box stores have to offer in this regard.)  

Thursday, Apr. 16, 2020

Louise Hedman
Even with the novel coronavirus pandemic hovering over us, we’ll be able to forget our worries when we’re able to get into our gardens this spring.

This moment is our real-life movie

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Preview

This moment is our real-life movie

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Friday, Mar. 20, 2020

The next few weeks will be a true testament of love, hate, tolerance, forgiveness, relationships and survival.  Families will be forced to spend way more time together than they ever dreamed of — at home, close to each other, actually talking and figuring out how to make the most of the endless amount of free time.  OK... some of that may not happen — but one can hope.  However, families may find themselves enjoying each other’s company and having some fun and laughs. Life is usually so busy we often don’t stop to really see each other, to appreciate what we have or who we are sharing our everyday lives with.  Even though this whole coronavirus thing is freaking everyone out, this time can also help humanity analyze our whole approach to existence and realize what we need to change.  Will we become involved to prevent a recurrence in the future, or is that beyond our scope as individuals? Will governments review food safety practices going forward, or will this become a new reality? Will relationships change as a result of social distancing and a dependence on online information? Will those distant connections be enough to fulfill our social needs?  Kids are over the moon with joy, their faces stuck in their phones as they strive to keep connected with their friends and carry on with online learning. But this is where the online restriction tools available from the phone providers may come in handy. They may not say it, but young people are looking to us for direction and reassurance. How can we direct if we have never experienced anything like this before? Calmness, humor and love are what come to mind at this point.   There are already many posts about people coming together to remain sane and keep connected. I feel there will be endless good news stories that will overshadow the bad. The sad story is there are many people who are not computer-literate or have no means of connecting to the outside world other than a TV or the good, old-fashioned landline telephone. These are the people who will become isolated and alone if an effort isn’t made to include them. Make an effort to check on your neighbours or friends who fit this bill.  We are now in the middle of an uncharted world experiment; this is our real-life movie.How it will end, nobody knows. But we should all come out of it educated, closer to our loved ones and still have the ability to love.That’s a good thing.  Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

The next few weeks will be a true testament of love, hate, tolerance, forgiveness, relationships and survival.  

Families will be forced to spend way more time together than they ever dreamed of — at home, close to each other, actually talking and figuring out how to make the most of the endless amount of free time.  

OK... some of that may not happen — but one can hope.  

Friday, Mar. 20, 2020

The next few weeks will be a true testament of love, hate, tolerance, forgiveness, relationships and survival.  Families will be forced to spend way more time together than they ever dreamed of — at home, close to each other, actually talking and figuring out how to make the most of the endless amount of free time.  OK... some of that may not happen — but one can hope.  However, families may find themselves enjoying each other’s company and having some fun and laughs. Life is usually so busy we often don’t stop to really see each other, to appreciate what we have or who we are sharing our everyday lives with.  Even though this whole coronavirus thing is freaking everyone out, this time can also help humanity analyze our whole approach to existence and realize what we need to change.  Will we become involved to prevent a recurrence in the future, or is that beyond our scope as individuals? Will governments review food safety practices going forward, or will this become a new reality? Will relationships change as a result of social distancing and a dependence on online information? Will those distant connections be enough to fulfill our social needs?  Kids are over the moon with joy, their faces stuck in their phones as they strive to keep connected with their friends and carry on with online learning. But this is where the online restriction tools available from the phone providers may come in handy. They may not say it, but young people are looking to us for direction and reassurance. How can we direct if we have never experienced anything like this before? Calmness, humor and love are what come to mind at this point.   There are already many posts about people coming together to remain sane and keep connected. I feel there will be endless good news stories that will overshadow the bad. The sad story is there are many people who are not computer-literate or have no means of connecting to the outside world other than a TV or the good, old-fashioned landline telephone. These are the people who will become isolated and alone if an effort isn’t made to include them. Make an effort to check on your neighbours or friends who fit this bill.  We are now in the middle of an uncharted world experiment; this is our real-life movie.How it will end, nobody knows. But we should all come out of it educated, closer to our loved ones and still have the ability to love.That’s a good thing.  Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

The next few weeks will be a true testament of love, hate, tolerance, forgiveness, relationships and survival.  

Families will be forced to spend way more time together than they ever dreamed of — at home, close to each other, actually talking and figuring out how to make the most of the endless amount of free time.  

OK... some of that may not happen — but one can hope.  

Lighten up when watching kids play

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Preview

Lighten up when watching kids play

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Friday, Jan. 24, 2020

I’ve spent many years sitting on cold, hard uncomfortable benches, bleachers and other forms of seating, proudly watching my kids learn and excel in the various sports they chose to participate in.  I’ve been proud, sad and worried — sometimes all within the same hour. In the end, it’s all been worth every minute. At times there has been disappointment in watching a team fall apart while trying its best but then you think “they are trying, they are having fun and will learn from their errors.”When people play games there is never a sure outcome. So many factors come into play. All kids play to the best of their abilities.  They all try their hardest — and everyone needs to remember that. Even the best athletes will make mistakes. The thing our kids absolutely don’t need is people yelling plays or shouting negativity at them from the stands or behind the glass.  They don’t need secret hand-signal plays, either. The absolute worst is when parents bang on the glass of a rink while completely freaking out on their child. Yes, this happens. I’ve seen it.  Not only does this totally make the parents look like fools, it embarrasses the kids and makes the whole team look bad. It makes you wonder how the children are being treated when they get into the vehicle to drive home or, worse, while they are at home. Is this considered bullying if parents are treating kids this way, or does that term  only apply when it happens in school ? Are we obligated to speak up or stay silent?  Parents have been evicted from rinks and fields by the officials for displaying such behaviour and some have had restraining orders filed against them. Hockey parents are required to complete the online Respect in Sport program. If this was mandatory for all sports, would it stop the behaviour completely? Likely not but it may be a deterrent for most. Officiating is never perfect, either. Referees and umpires are people; they make mistakes, sometimes a lot of mistakes but, whatever. These mistakes may make you really angry but yelling and freaking out will not change a thing. It will only get you kicked out or branded as “that parent.”  We’ve all been there. Officiating can and does affect the outcome of games but what can you do about it?So here’s a friendly reminder to all you spectators out there — remember, these are just kids, they are playing to have fun, make friends and improve their sporting ability.Some may go on to bigger and better things but most will not and they should be able to look back on their childhood sporting experiences with happiness.Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

I’ve spent many years sitting on cold, hard uncomfortable benches, bleachers and other forms of seating, proudly watching my kids learn and excel in the various sports they chose to participate in.  

I’ve been proud, sad and worried — sometimes all within the same hour. In the end, it’s all been worth every minute. At times there has been disappointment in watching a team fall apart while trying its best but then you think “they are trying, they are having fun and will learn from their errors.”

When people play games there is never a sure outcome. So many factors come into play. All kids play to the best of their abilities. They all try their hardest — and everyone needs to remember that. Even the best athletes will make mistakes. 

Friday, Jan. 24, 2020

Herald
Remember — regardless what happens on the rink, playing field or in the gymnasium, you’re watching kids play a sport while being officiated by other kids.

15 minutes of feel-good stories each week

Louise Hedman 3 minute read Preview

15 minutes of feel-good stories each week

Louise Hedman 3 minute read Monday, Dec. 23, 2019

Every time I pick up the daily newspaper or click on a news app certain feelings are evoked. More often than not, it’s not a nice feeling. No warm fuzziness or words that might bring a smile to my face. More like feelings of anger, sadness and hopelessness.Our city is in the midst of financial change, our province has a few issues, as well. I won’t even talk about the world.But then there’s that little paper published by Canstar Community News that shows up once a week, tucked within the flyers, that provides at least 15 minutes of good feelings. You can read the entire paper and rarely find a story that makes you feel bad. It’s filled with positive stories about our communities and the people living in them. Our neighbours and friends are actually out there having fun, participating in a variety of sports and bringing home the medals. Members of our communities are singing, laughing, creating and doing great things for one another. If someone is ill, they rally around to support financially or otherwise. If people are down and out, they will serve meals or knit some socks. You name it and our neighbours will attempt it. Although it’s good to keep up on the world around you it’s even better to take the time to read the stories that evoke the good feelings we all have inside us to help us make it through the day.Happy holidays everyone!Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

Every time I pick up the daily newspaper or click on a news app certain feelings are evoked. More often than not, it’s not a nice feeling. No warm fuzziness or words that might bring a smile to my face. More like feelings of anger, sadness and hopelessness.

Our city is in the midst of financial change, our province has a few issues, as well. I won’t even talk about the world.

But then there’s that little paper published by Canstar Community News that shows up once a week, tucked within the flyers, that provides at least 15 minutes of good feelings. You can read the entire paper and rarely find a story that makes you feel bad. It’s filled with positive stories about our communities and the people living in them. Our neighbours and friends are actually out there having fun, participating in a variety of sports and bringing home the medals. 

Monday, Dec. 23, 2019

Every time I pick up the daily newspaper or click on a news app certain feelings are evoked. More often than not, it’s not a nice feeling. No warm fuzziness or words that might bring a smile to my face. More like feelings of anger, sadness and hopelessness.Our city is in the midst of financial change, our province has a few issues, as well. I won’t even talk about the world.But then there’s that little paper published by Canstar Community News that shows up once a week, tucked within the flyers, that provides at least 15 minutes of good feelings. You can read the entire paper and rarely find a story that makes you feel bad. It’s filled with positive stories about our communities and the people living in them. Our neighbours and friends are actually out there having fun, participating in a variety of sports and bringing home the medals. Members of our communities are singing, laughing, creating and doing great things for one another. If someone is ill, they rally around to support financially or otherwise. If people are down and out, they will serve meals or knit some socks. You name it and our neighbours will attempt it. Although it’s good to keep up on the world around you it’s even better to take the time to read the stories that evoke the good feelings we all have inside us to help us make it through the day.Happy holidays everyone!Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

Every time I pick up the daily newspaper or click on a news app certain feelings are evoked. More often than not, it’s not a nice feeling. No warm fuzziness or words that might bring a smile to my face. More like feelings of anger, sadness and hopelessness.

Our city is in the midst of financial change, our province has a few issues, as well. I won’t even talk about the world.

But then there’s that little paper published by Canstar Community News that shows up once a week, tucked within the flyers, that provides at least 15 minutes of good feelings. You can read the entire paper and rarely find a story that makes you feel bad. It’s filled with positive stories about our communities and the people living in them. Our neighbours and friends are actually out there having fun, participating in a variety of sports and bringing home the medals. 

Best Western Premier a welcome addition

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Preview

Best Western Premier a welcome addition

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Friday, Nov. 29, 2019

Situated at 900 Regent Ave. West, not far from the heart of Transcona sits an absolutely gorgeous new Best Western Premier hotel which opened in September of 2019.I recently had the pleasure of meeting with Steven James, the general manager, as I have been watching the construction since 2018 and wanted to take a look.  When you walk into the lobby, you will be in awe. The artwork throughout the hotel has a railway theme, with a mix of old and new, incorporating graffiti modern colour. And black-and-white photos.Sherwood Sharfe, who owns the hotel, was employed with CN Rail in his younger days and thought carrying the railway theme throughout would be a nice way to tie it to the community.  The sundry area of the lobby is set up to display a wide variety of items, with attention paid to providing local product whenever possible. There are a couple of children’s books authored by Elaine Sharfe, who is Sherwood’s wife. Other intriguing items are teddy bears created by artisans in Thailand using leftover carpet yarn. This project is called “Weaving a Better Life” and is just one of the sustainable initiatives with Interface Flooring Products. Sherwood’s Bistro Bar is a bright and spacious restaurant, with a full-wall fireplace adding a cozy touch.  The restaurant is open to the public from 5 to 11 p.m. There is a fully licensed bar with local brews. A large patio, equipped with fire tables sits adjacent to the restaurant and is also open from 5 to 11 p.m. —  a relaxing space to enjoy Transcona evenings with friends.  The Best Western Beer Boutique is situated in the northwest corner of the lot and features a growler bar, with designer craft, international and local beer.   Each of the hotel’s floors has a colour theme tied into the flooring and features room types to fit all needs.   There is a large pool, waterslide and hot tub area featuring a cloud ceiling which tones down the echo that usually comes with an indoor pool. There is also a large gym on site with professional-grade equipment and added extras not found in most hotels. The next phase for this location will be a small conference facility attached to the northeast side of the hotel, with a capacity ranging from 400 to 500 people. It will cater to corporate clients, trade shows, weddings, reunions and other events.  The Sharfe family has done a remarkable job with this hotel, using local companies whenever possible for everything inside and out.  James had nothing but praise for Sherwood, Elaine and their daughter, Heather Fenyes, and is thrilled to be working with them.  Fenyes is involved with the operation of the hotel, along with her many other endeavors to make the world a better place. For more information, visit bestwestern.comLouise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

Situated at 900 Regent Ave. West, not far from the heart of Transcona sits an absolutely gorgeous new Best Western Premier hotel which opened in September.

I recently had the pleasure of meeting with Steven James, the general manager, as I have been watching the construction since 2018 and wanted to take a look.  

When you walk into the lobby, you will be in awe. The artwork throughout the hotel has a railway theme, with a mix of old and new, incorporating graffiti modern colour. And black-and-white photos.

Friday, Nov. 29, 2019

Herald
The new Best Western Premier Hotel sells children's books by co-owner Elaine Sharfe as well as teddy bears made in Thailand using leftover carpet yarn.

Be sure to exercise your right to vote

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Preview

Be sure to exercise your right to vote

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Friday, Oct. 4, 2019

After coming away from last month’s provincial election and having to prepare to vote in the federal election on Oct. 21, many people may be confused or frustrated. But don’t worry, there are people in your districts to assist you with any questions, concerns or changes you may have. Whether you are registering to vote, figuring out where your poll is situated, what sort of identification is required or you have other questions, there are numerous places to get answers.  Elections Canada officials will be setting up a revision and information kiosk in the Elmwood-Transcona electoral district at Transcona Public Library (1 Transcona Blvd.) on Thurs., Oct. 10 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Agents will be present to assist in registering those who did not receive voting cards in the mail or have recently moved into the area. Just because you voted in the provincial election doesn’t necessarily mean you will receive a registration card for the federal election in the mail. If you haven’t received one, contact elections Canada at 1-800-463-6868.If you have access to a computer you can visit www.electionscanada.ca, where there is a trove of information about candidates on the ballet, job opportunities, polling station locations and much more. You can also check to see if you are registered to vote. Are you registered to vote?If you’re voting for the first time or recently moved recently, make sure your registration is up to date.For some, the act of voting can be quite an exciting experience, especially those turning 18 years of age and voting for the first time or those who are new citizens of Canada.There are numerous dates and ways to cast your vote. You can walk into any Elections Canada office between their posted hours and vote, or you can visit the advance polls listed on your voter ID card or the Elections Canada website, or you can wait until Oct. 21.  You will most likely run into friends or neighbours at the polls, which can give you a chance to catch up with them. So, young people, let’s get out there and start the new trend.  We live in a democratic country where all eligible citizens have the right to participate, either directly or indirectly, in making the decisions that affect them. Free, fair and inclusive elections, organized periodically by strong institutions and conducted in accordance with international standards, are essential for any functional democracy.Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

After coming away from last month’s provincial election and having to prepare to vote in the federal election on Oct. 21, many people may be confused or frustrated.

 But don’t worry, there are people in your districts to assist you with any questions, concerns or changes you may have. Whether you are registering to vote, figuring out where your poll is situated, what sort of identification is required or you have other questions, there are numerous places to get answers.  

Elections Canada officials will be setting up a revision and information kiosk in the Elmwood-Transcona electoral district at Transcona Public Library (1 Transcona Blvd.) on Thurs., Oct. 10 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Friday, Oct. 4, 2019

Dreamstime.com
If you haven’t received a voting ID card in the mail from Elections Canada, you can check whether you’re registered at the Elections Canada website or visit its information kiosk at Transcona Library on Oct. 10.

Thoughts on aging and the passion of youth

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Preview

Thoughts on aging and the passion of youth

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Friday, Sep. 6, 2019

When people are young they wish to be older. When they finally age, they regret what they wished for.  Realizing it’s too late and that time will never go backwards, we are constantly flung into the future, bracing ourselves for what it waiting for us. We spend the rest of our lives trying to do whatever we think will maintain our youth. Whether it’s taking care of our bodies or grooming ourselves to appear younger, wearing certain fashion items that are hip or portray the latest trends, we just keep trying.  What makes a human being act in this way?  It’s definitely a thing almost everyone does. Multiple factors in our lives contribute to the human aging process. Whether it’s genetics, geographic location, employment opportunities or our role in society, each small thing plays an integral part.  There are many research papers on the topic of aging, some of which are pretty scientific and can hurt the brain when reading. They offer endless things to think about as we continue on our journey to wherever it is we end up. I’m guessing there have already been breakthroughs that haven’t been made public and may never be.  The world can only sustain so many people and the possibility of extending life would cause undue strain.  Thankfully, the youth of today have become instantly aware of the damage that previous and current generations have caused and are beginning to take immediate action to reverse it.  I am proud to see they are watching, listening and acting to save their home planet. Although they are only young they are thinking like adults and have role models such as 16-year-old Greta Thunberg, who are not afraid to lead the way. So live life to the fullest, have fun and appreciate yourself at whatever age you are. Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

When people are young they wish to be older. When they finally age, they regret what they wished for.  

Realizing it’s too late and that time will never go backwards, we are constantly flung into the future, bracing ourselves for what it waiting for us. We spend the rest of our lives trying to do whatever we think will maintain our youth. 

Whether it’s taking care of our bodies or grooming ourselves to appear younger, wearing certain fashion items that are hip or portray the latest trends, we just keep trying.  

Friday, Sep. 6, 2019

Herald
Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg, pictured earlier this year at the European Union parliament, is a role model for today’s young people.

Celebrating all that Transcona is and was

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Preview

Celebrating all that Transcona is and was

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Friday, Jul. 12, 2019

Every once in a while I hear them. The crude comments and subtle remarks aimed at our little community. They evoke an anger that prompts a response, not necessarily at the time, but eventually in one way or another.  I am not sure if everyone feels the same about where they came from but I feel most have some sense of pride or feel a lifelong connection to their roots.So, let’s not forget which community won BOB FM’s Battle of the Neighbourhoods contest and trophy this spring. During the live radio celebration in Transcona Centennial Square, numerous local business owners came out to offer some of their products to the radio hosts who were overwhelmed by our little community and its uniqueness.  The town of Transcona came into existence in the early 1900s, when the Grand Trunk Pacific and National Transcontinental Railways decided to work together to build a second railway line across Canada.Transcona would become the heart of the two, joining the west and east coasts of Canada while providing a repair and maintenance shop.  When you think of it that way, Transcona was an integral location which enabled the Canadian National Railway to become what it is today. Those who settled in Transcona were the work crews who began the construction of the shops. As a result of this settlement, a board of trade was formed in 1911 and the town of Transcona was incorporated in 1912. It began with hard-working, blue-collar roots and has continued for over 111 years.  Such a community is something to be proud of. It has grown from a vast prairie field to a bustling community with approximately 42,000 people residing in it. The population continues to grow every day and these days Transcona is a diverse and multicultural community. Surrounded by the R.M. of Springfield on three sides, we just missed out on being an island. No, wait — you could say we used to be an island. To the west, the original connection to the City of Winnipeg was a long dirt road stretching past cold prairie fields. Because of its dark and remote location, the Starlite Drive-In Theatre was situated along a stretch of Pandora Avenue West. There are many great memories for all those who were lucky enough to frequent it. There are some days when I think it would be nice if we could go back to being a remote little town full of people who knew their neighbours’ names and who would always offer a friendly hello. But that’s not possible, so all our volunteers, community groups and business members will keep striving to make this community a great one and to educate all those who are unfamiliar with this great place so they can feel the love like we do. There are some great reads on the history of Transcona, its population and the various wards and what they are actually called on the following websites: • www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/mb_history/13/transconatour.shtml• www.transconamuseum.mb.ca/post/2017/11/16/communities-that-time-forgot-south-transcona• winnipeg.ca/Clerks/WardsBoundaries/pdfs/wardmaps/PopulationMaps/Transcona-population.pdfLouise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

Every once in a while I hear them. The crude comments and subtle remarks aimed at our little community. They evoke an anger that prompts a response, not necessarily at the time, but eventually in one way or another.  

I am not sure if everyone feels the same about where they came from but I feel most have some sense of pride or feel a lifelong connection to their roots.

So, let’s not forget which community won BOB FM’s Battle of the Neighbourhoods contest and trophy this spring. During the live radio celebration in Transcona Centennial Square, numerous local business owners came out to offer some of their products to the radio hosts who were overwhelmed by our little community and its uniqueness.  

Friday, Jul. 12, 2019

Herald
Mike Martel (a.k.a. Mr. Transcona) holds the trophy won by the Park City in BOB FM's spring Battle of the Neighbourhoods contest.

Keeping an eye out for the neighbourhood

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Preview

Keeping an eye out for the neighbourhood

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Friday, Mar. 22, 2019

A home is one of the largest investments a person or family will make in their lifetime.They commit to a mortgage and take pride in their purchase. It is considered a safe and happy place where they will raise a family, create memories, make new friends and, in some cases, live their entire lives. When people choose a neighbourhood to live in they carefully consider schools, shopping, recreation and employment.  When neighbourhoods begin to change due to aging infrastructure, declining interest in worship or various other reasons, developers begin to explore the possibilities.There are those developers who carefully plan their next steps within a neighbourhood and who design projects that fit in without disturbing the vibe, so to speak. Others design for maximum profit without regard for the people who have invested everything into their areas.I have lived in the Transcona area for many years and I have seen it evolve from a small-town feel, where everyone knows everyone else, to a place that is changing rapidly. I am beginning to see small empty lots filled with homes that don’t match the surrounding houses and towering complexes overshadowing the neighbourhood’s original one-storey homes. Most people are passive and don’t pay much attention when something new is proposed, while others will stand up to make themselves heard.  In my daily travels I see multiple new complexes that have been approved by the City of Winnipeg that do not allow sufficient parking spaces per unit. The new norm is 1.2 spaces per unit, which means residents of these new complexes park on surrounding streets. Residents who are unwilling neighbors to these complexes now have difficulty finding spots in front of their own homes for an additional vehicle or visiting friends or relatives.  Something else that has been overlooked is building height. Some units being proposed are three or more storeys high (35 feet), adjacent to homes that are 14 feet tall, on average. Homeowners will no longer have privacy in their own yards and, in certain circumstances, will no longer experience sunlight through the windows or in their yards.  All of these things ultimately affect the value of our properties and not always for the better. Many neighbourhoods have been in the news lately, protesting these very scenarios.Should we be allowing those we elected to office and the committees making the decisions to continue with these approvals, or should we be standing up for the little things we enjoy in the biggest investments of our lives? It’s your call. Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

A home is one of the largest investments a person or family will make in their lifetime.

They commit to a mortgage and take pride in their purchase. It is considered a safe and happy place where they will raise a family, create memories, make new friends and, in some cases, live their entire lives. 

When people choose a neighbourhood to live in they carefully consider schools, shopping, recreation and employment.  

Friday, Mar. 22, 2019

A home is one of the largest investments a person or family will make in their lifetime.They commit to a mortgage and take pride in their purchase. It is considered a safe and happy place where they will raise a family, create memories, make new friends and, in some cases, live their entire lives. When people choose a neighbourhood to live in they carefully consider schools, shopping, recreation and employment.  When neighbourhoods begin to change due to aging infrastructure, declining interest in worship or various other reasons, developers begin to explore the possibilities.There are those developers who carefully plan their next steps within a neighbourhood and who design projects that fit in without disturbing the vibe, so to speak. Others design for maximum profit without regard for the people who have invested everything into their areas.I have lived in the Transcona area for many years and I have seen it evolve from a small-town feel, where everyone knows everyone else, to a place that is changing rapidly. I am beginning to see small empty lots filled with homes that don’t match the surrounding houses and towering complexes overshadowing the neighbourhood’s original one-storey homes. Most people are passive and don’t pay much attention when something new is proposed, while others will stand up to make themselves heard.  In my daily travels I see multiple new complexes that have been approved by the City of Winnipeg that do not allow sufficient parking spaces per unit. The new norm is 1.2 spaces per unit, which means residents of these new complexes park on surrounding streets. Residents who are unwilling neighbors to these complexes now have difficulty finding spots in front of their own homes for an additional vehicle or visiting friends or relatives.  Something else that has been overlooked is building height. Some units being proposed are three or more storeys high (35 feet), adjacent to homes that are 14 feet tall, on average. Homeowners will no longer have privacy in their own yards and, in certain circumstances, will no longer experience sunlight through the windows or in their yards.  All of these things ultimately affect the value of our properties and not always for the better. Many neighbourhoods have been in the news lately, protesting these very scenarios.Should we be allowing those we elected to office and the committees making the decisions to continue with these approvals, or should we be standing up for the little things we enjoy in the biggest investments of our lives? It’s your call. Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

A home is one of the largest investments a person or family will make in their lifetime.

They commit to a mortgage and take pride in their purchase. It is considered a safe and happy place where they will raise a family, create memories, make new friends and, in some cases, live their entire lives. 

When people choose a neighbourhood to live in they carefully consider schools, shopping, recreation and employment.  

Ah, the joy of pets and parenting

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Preview

Ah, the joy of pets and parenting

Louise Hedman 5 minute read Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019

When someone you love asks you if your family can add a pet as an addition to your family, just say no!   There’s always that thing that kids do when they ask a parent the all-important question: First they put their little hand in yours and give you a hug “just because” — then they look you in the eye, lower their voices and say, “Mom, can we get a cat, (or dog, fish, hamster, guinea pig, tea cup pig, hedgehog, horse, donkey or a rabbit)?  It’s the way they do it that melts your heart and lowers your defences. The batting of the eyelashes, the cutesy voice and, of course, the promises. They will use that word more than they ever have or will in the next 15 years.  “I promise I will take care of it, I promise I will feed it, I promise I will play with it,” and, most important of all, “I promise I will clean up its poop.” So what do we do? We agree, knowing that they may or may not live up to all the promises. It’s like we are conducting an experiment on our children to see if they are able to keep promises. I’d love to hear the stats on exactly how many families have had a positive result on this test.  Once the pet arrives in your home, it’s a big deal for about two months and then the poor little thing starts to get lonely.The reminders start to come weekly, then daily. The pet may start to act out to get attention. It may chew your furniture, your hockey jerseys and anything paper-like. It will mark its territory on your precious things.  In the end, someone other than the promiser will have to do all the necessary tasks involved with caring for the pet and each and every time they are performing the task the same thought will resurface:“I will never do this again.”The funniest thing is the kids keep on trying. Every few months they will say “can we get a dog?  I love dogs, I will take care of it, and I will do everything.”That’s when the look will come out, they know exactly what it means but they don’t care, they will continue to test us to see when we are ready to crack again.  Joey is a blue dwarf rabbit who is loved.Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

When someone you love asks you if your family can add a pet as an addition to your family, just say no! 

There’s always that thing that kids do when they ask a parent the all-important question: First they put their little hand in yours and give you a hug “just because” — then they look you in the eye, lower their voices and say, “Mom, can we get a cat, (or dog, fish, hamster, guinea pig, tea cup pig, hedgehog, horse, donkey or a rabbit)?  

It’s the way they do it that melts your heart and lowers your defences. The batting of the eyelashes, the cutesy voice and, of course, the promises. They will use that word more than they ever have or will in the next 15 years.  

Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019

When someone you love asks you if your family can add a pet as an addition to your family, just say no!   There’s always that thing that kids do when they ask a parent the all-important question: First they put their little hand in yours and give you a hug “just because” — then they look you in the eye, lower their voices and say, “Mom, can we get a cat, (or dog, fish, hamster, guinea pig, tea cup pig, hedgehog, horse, donkey or a rabbit)?  It’s the way they do it that melts your heart and lowers your defences. The batting of the eyelashes, the cutesy voice and, of course, the promises. They will use that word more than they ever have or will in the next 15 years.  “I promise I will take care of it, I promise I will feed it, I promise I will play with it,” and, most important of all, “I promise I will clean up its poop.” So what do we do? We agree, knowing that they may or may not live up to all the promises. It’s like we are conducting an experiment on our children to see if they are able to keep promises. I’d love to hear the stats on exactly how many families have had a positive result on this test.  Once the pet arrives in your home, it’s a big deal for about two months and then the poor little thing starts to get lonely.The reminders start to come weekly, then daily. The pet may start to act out to get attention. It may chew your furniture, your hockey jerseys and anything paper-like. It will mark its territory on your precious things.  In the end, someone other than the promiser will have to do all the necessary tasks involved with caring for the pet and each and every time they are performing the task the same thought will resurface:“I will never do this again.”The funniest thing is the kids keep on trying. Every few months they will say “can we get a dog?  I love dogs, I will take care of it, and I will do everything.”That’s when the look will come out, they know exactly what it means but they don’t care, they will continue to test us to see when we are ready to crack again.  Joey is a blue dwarf rabbit who is loved.Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

When someone you love asks you if your family can add a pet as an addition to your family, just say no! 

There’s always that thing that kids do when they ask a parent the all-important question: First they put their little hand in yours and give you a hug “just because” — then they look you in the eye, lower their voices and say, “Mom, can we get a cat, (or dog, fish, hamster, guinea pig, tea cup pig, hedgehog, horse, donkey or a rabbit)?  

It’s the way they do it that melts your heart and lowers your defences. The batting of the eyelashes, the cutesy voice and, of course, the promises. They will use that word more than they ever have or will in the next 15 years.  

The thrill of being a movie stuntman

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Preview

The thrill of being a movie stuntman

Louise Hedman 6 minute read Friday, Jan. 25, 2019

Being in front of a camera isn’t always about the glamour. Sometimes it’s about the thrill, excitement and danger of doing something for a living where each day is never the same and you love every minute of it.  There are so many aspects of the movie industry that the general population would never fathom.  When we see the final results in the form of a movie, mini-series, video, documentary or short film, we usually don’t care to know how many hundreds of people are involved from start to finish in every aspect.  I spoke with B.J. Verot, a local filmmaker and stunt artist to learn more about the stunt portion of his career. B.J. began by enrolling in a stage combat course through the University of Winnipeg theatre and film department when he was 25 years old.  His instructor was Rick Skene, who made quite the impression, and B.J. was forever hooked. After completing the course, B.J. began to work with Skene Stunts, for whom he has since performed multiple stunts in a variety of genres. B.J. has been shot by Keanu Reeves in the movie Siberia, surfed down the hood of a vehicle moving up to 70 km/h per hour in Joy Ride 3, performed as a stunt double for Robert Englund (a.k.a. Freddy Krueger) in Midnight Man and was set on fire in the movie I Still See You.  The fire story intrigued me as being the most dangerous. In a nutshell. B.J. says the process boils down to preparation, trusting in your team,and staying calm in the moment. He stresses that the stunt community in Manitoba is tight-knit and safety is a top priority when working with stunt actors.  Working in the stunt industry has allowed B.J. to further pursue his interest in film making, writing and producing. He recently collaborated with Ken Janssens to co-write a feature film entitled The Return, a sci-fi horror film about a student returning to his family home where horrors from his childhood may not be as dead as he thought. The film is currently in post-production and is set to be released in mid-2019.B.J. won a 2018 ACTRA Manitoba award for outstanding performance by a male actor in a short, for his work alongside Sean Skene in the film, Fisher Cove, in which a fisherman and his dog hunt down a creature that does not belong in Falcon Lake. You can find out more about B.J. Looking him up at IMDB.com If you’re interested in pursuing a career in stunts, it’s generally advised you be 18 years of age; it’s helpful to have a background in sports such as gymnastics or judo, as they teach the art of soft landing and you may want to visit Skene Stunts online at skenestunts.comLouise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

Being in front of a camera isn’t always about the glamour. Sometimes it’s about the thrill, excitement and danger of doing something for a living where each day is never the same and you love every minute of it.  

There are so many aspects of the movie industry that the general population would never fathom. When we see the final results in the form of a movie, mini-series, video, documentary or short film, we usually don’t care to know how many hundreds of people are involved from start to finish in every aspect.  

I spoke with B.J. Verot, a local filmmaker and stunt artist to learn more about the stunt portion of his career. 

Friday, Jan. 25, 2019

Supplied photo
Local stuntman, actor and filmmaker B.J. Verot won an ACTRA Manitoba award for his work in Fisher Cove.

Live life to the fullest — every day

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Preview

Live life to the fullest — every day

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Friday, Nov. 30, 2018

We will all experience death at some point in our lifetimes. It’s a fact of living. We dread the day but know it is coming. The experience of losing important people we have shared our lives with is not a good one.When it happens multiple times within a short period of time, it’s even worse. We try to shield our children from it for as long as possible but when the experience happens to them, your heart goes out even more because we never want to see them hurting. It makes a person think about how precious life really is and how short it can be for some.  We all start out the same but our destinies are all so different. Multiple factors come into play that will steer us to our final destinations. We all hope for a long and happy life full of children, friends and family.  Most people end up on the long road of life with great life stories to tell. Others are not so lucky. Even though they have great stories to tell, their lives end far too soon, with unfinished business to be taken care of.  When we lose those special peopl,e a part of us is lost with them. There will always be a lump in your throat or a throbbing in your heart when you think of them. You keep checking your phone, hoping they will continue that last text conversation you had, or a song comes on that reminds you of those crazy things you used to do together. Certain times of the year are meant for celebrating with family and friends to enjoy their company and to appreciate the things you have.  This holiday season, make an effort to really appreciate everything in your life — your partner, your children, your neighbours, your favorite co-workers, and all those friends you haven’t seen because we are all just too busy.Life can be short, let’s make the most of it. Louise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

We will all experience death at some point in our lifetimes. It’s a fact of living. We dread the day but know it is coming. The experience of losing important people we have shared our lives with is not a good one.

When it happens multiple times within a short period of time, it’s even worse. We try to shield our children from it for as long as possible but when the experience happens to them, your heart goes out even more because we never want to see them hurting. It makes a person think about how precious life really is and how short it can be for some.  

We all start out the same but our destinies are all so different. Multiple factors come into play that will steer us to our final destinations. We all hope for a long and happy life full of children, friends and family.  

Friday, Nov. 30, 2018

The sadnesses of life should be a reminder to enjoy as much of it as you can.

The Painter’s Cafe is a creative haven

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Preview

The Painter’s Cafe is a creative haven

Louise Hedman 4 minute read Friday, Nov. 2, 2018

Tucked away in a small storefront at the northernmost end of Plessis Road, The Painter’s Cafe is a cool place to learn how to explore your creativity and/or to purchase fantastic treasures made by Michele and Angie Zubrin.  The sisters had a dream of making a living doing what made them happy and they have done just that. In June, 2017, they began establishing a beautiful store at 2089 Plessis Rd. full of reborn furniture, hand-painted rustic signs, home decor items and much more.  Angie uses her creativity to transform the look of almost anything to make it beautiful again. She’ll also create a custom sign or revive a piece of furniture on request. The signs have become quite popular with real estate representatives as gifts for clients. For her part, Michele will whip up multiple woodworking projects and The Painter’s Cafe offers a variety of weeknight classes. You can learn the techniques of working with chalk paint, wax and brushes to create your own masterpieces.  They also offer team-building sessions and even do teen birthday parties. Every Thursday evening,a sign workshop comes to life, offering people an opportunity to paint custom signs with more than 100 different stencils to choose from. Angie’s paint of choice is a Canadian product called Fat Paint which eliminates the need to strip sand or prime anything. There are 56 colorus to choose from and it can be purchased at the store. A Tuesday night course is offered to help people learn how to use the product, as it is not the same as using regular paint (a 10 per cent discount is offered on completion of the class). To enroll in any of the classes you must register at least one week in advance to allow preparation time. Milk classes will be a new addition in the new year. With the holiday season approaching, they are stocking up on unique gift items and will have stocking stuffer gifts under $45 and an assortment of packaged gifts at $25.  Enjoy a gourmet hot chocolate or coffee while you browse the store. Find out more by checking out the website at www.thepainterscafe.com, look for them on Facebook, or find them on Instagram: @thepainterscafeLouise Hedman is a community correspondent for Transcona. 

Tucked away in a small storefront at the northernmost end of Plessis Road, The Painter’s Cafe is a cool place to learn how to explore your creativity and/or to purchase fantastic treasures made by Michele and Angie Zubrin.  

The sisters had a dream of making a living doing what made them happy and they have done just that. In June, 2017, they began establishing a beautiful store at 2089 Plessis Rd. full of reborn furniture, hand-painted rustic signs, home decor items and much more.  

Angie uses her creativity to transform the look of almost anything to make it beautiful again. She’ll also create a custom sign or revive a piece of furniture on request. The signs have become quite popular with real estate representatives as gifts for clients. 

Friday, Nov. 2, 2018

Herald
The Painter's Cafe, at 2089 Plessis Rd., is already preparing for the holiday season — which will be here before we know it.