Malaya Marcelino

Malaya Marcelino

Notre Dame constituency report

Malaya Marcelino is the NDP MLA for Notre Dame.

Recent articles of Malaya Marcelino

Take action — call the Notre Dame Powerline

Malaya Marcelino 2 minute read Preview

Take action — call the Notre Dame Powerline

Malaya Marcelino 2 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2022

Notre Dame families want to live in a thriving, supportive community that’s safe for all ages. That’s why community safety is top of mind for those across Notre Dame. I’ve hosted multiple meetings throughout Notre Dame including in Sargent Park, Daniel Mac and with the West Alexander Residents Association.

Since this spring, community members have raised concerns over unsafe activity in the neighbourhood. Community members have reported seeing an increase in garbage and litter build-up , as well as reported increases in theft, violent incidents, and substance abuse. I have also heard concerns about abandoned properties.

Volunteers have since taken the initiative to address these concerns through organized community-based action by creating the Notre Dame Powerline. Notre Dame has modelled this Powerline after the North Point Douglas Powerline. This original initiative was created 14 years ago by concerned community members such as Sel Burrows in order to empower our communities to make a positive change to community health and safety.

Notre Dame Powerline is volunteer-run and works in partnership with City By-law enforcement, the police community support unit and fire prevention services. Notre Dame Powerline focuses on:

Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2022

Notre Dame families want to live in a thriving, supportive community that’s safe for all ages. That’s why community safety is top of mind for those across Notre Dame. I’ve hosted multiple meetings throughout Notre Dame including in Sargent Park, Daniel Mac and with the West Alexander Residents Association.

Since this spring, community members have raised concerns over unsafe activity in the neighbourhood. Community members have reported seeing an increase in garbage and litter build-up , as well as reported increases in theft, violent incidents, and substance abuse. I have also heard concerns about abandoned properties.

Volunteers have since taken the initiative to address these concerns through organized community-based action by creating the Notre Dame Powerline. Notre Dame has modelled this Powerline after the North Point Douglas Powerline. This original initiative was created 14 years ago by concerned community members such as Sel Burrows in order to empower our communities to make a positive change to community health and safety.

Notre Dame Powerline is volunteer-run and works in partnership with City By-law enforcement, the police community support unit and fire prevention services. Notre Dame Powerline focuses on:

Addressing crime in Notre Dame

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Preview

Addressing crime in Notre Dame

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2022

Winnipeg is experiencing a significant increase in violent crime.

I recently took part in a community meeting with West End residents and councillor Cindy Gilroy at Freedom International Church to hear community concerns. They have good reason to raise this issue. Violent crime increased in 2021, and preliminary data from the Winnipeg Police Service’s Crime Map suggest there has been a nearly 20 per cent increase in violent crime in Winnipeg over the last twelve months. That same source showed that property crime has also begun to increase over last year.

While there are no easy answers to address violent crime, we know there are several things that must be done to address this problem. One of the big drivers of crime is mental health and addiction, and we have long called for much greater resources for mental health and harm reduction and the focused attention of government to address addiction. We know that existing initiatives are not doing near enough as the harm of drug addiction has exploded over the last five years. We want to see a lot more done to address the rising cost of addiction and its impact on crime in Winnipeg.

We also know that poverty has an impact on the rate of crime. While the issue is complex, we know that crime is less likely to happen when people have their basic needs met. That’s why we have long called for Manitoba to adopt a living wage. No one who works full-time should have to live in poverty. Unfortunately, even with recent announcements, by this fall, Manitoba will still have the second-lowest minimum wage in the country. We feel this is an urgent issue that needs to be addressed.

Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2022

Winnipeg is experiencing a significant increase in violent crime.

I recently took part in a community meeting with West End residents and councillor Cindy Gilroy at Freedom International Church to hear community concerns. They have good reason to raise this issue. Violent crime increased in 2021, and preliminary data from the Winnipeg Police Service’s Crime Map suggest there has been a nearly 20 per cent increase in violent crime in Winnipeg over the last twelve months. That same source showed that property crime has also begun to increase over last year.

While there are no easy answers to address violent crime, we know there are several things that must be done to address this problem. One of the big drivers of crime is mental health and addiction, and we have long called for much greater resources for mental health and harm reduction and the focused attention of government to address addiction. We know that existing initiatives are not doing near enough as the harm of drug addiction has exploded over the last five years. We want to see a lot more done to address the rising cost of addiction and its impact on crime in Winnipeg.

We also know that poverty has an impact on the rate of crime. While the issue is complex, we know that crime is less likely to happen when people have their basic needs met. That’s why we have long called for Manitoba to adopt a living wage. No one who works full-time should have to live in poverty. Unfortunately, even with recent announcements, by this fall, Manitoba will still have the second-lowest minimum wage in the country. We feel this is an urgent issue that needs to be addressed.

Support needed for neighbourhood cleanups

Malaya Marcelino 2 minute read Preview

Support needed for neighbourhood cleanups

Malaya Marcelino 2 minute read Wednesday, May. 25, 2022

After a long and snowy winter, spring is finally upon us and like many Notre Dame residents, I can’t wait to spend more time outside enjoying the warmer temperatures. However, we have all noticed that as the snow fades from sight, there is now a massive amount of garbage piled up through the winter.

I have been calling on the city to speed up the clean-up process but with an issue of this proportion it is clear that the city can’t do it alone and the province needs to step in with more resources. In the short term, I have asked for support from the province to organize multiple, large community-wide clean-ups, the type that require small Bobcats, dumpster bins and transportation rentals. I am hoping to get a positive response soon.

Despite the huge challenges presented by the amount of garbage in our communities, there are so many people and organizations, such as the West Alexander Resident’s Association, Spence Neighbourhood Association, and Central Neighbourhoods, which have stepped up and organized major cleaning operations. It has been amazing to see our community come together because we care about a clean environment and the safety of kids and neighbours.

However, we also need long-term solutions to the many issues, including hazardous garbage, that are so interconnected. There are so many systemic issues contributing to our city’s garbage problem but the Progressive Conservative government is not doing nearly enough to address these issues. It has sold off social housing and failed to repair existing social housing, it cut people off from disability and regular EIA benefits, and it has raised Manitoba Hydro rates while letting our minimum wage fall to the lowest in the country by the end of the year. These are the issues my NDP colleagues and I raise in the Legislature every single day.

Wednesday, May. 25, 2022

After a long and snowy winter, spring is finally upon us and like many Notre Dame residents, I can’t wait to spend more time outside enjoying the warmer temperatures. However, we have all noticed that as the snow fades from sight, there is now a massive amount of garbage piled up through the winter.

I have been calling on the city to speed up the clean-up process but with an issue of this proportion it is clear that the city can’t do it alone and the province needs to step in with more resources. In the short term, I have asked for support from the province to organize multiple, large community-wide clean-ups, the type that require small Bobcats, dumpster bins and transportation rentals. I am hoping to get a positive response soon.

Despite the huge challenges presented by the amount of garbage in our communities, there are so many people and organizations, such as the West Alexander Resident’s Association, Spence Neighbourhood Association, and Central Neighbourhoods, which have stepped up and organized major cleaning operations. It has been amazing to see our community come together because we care about a clean environment and the safety of kids and neighbours.

However, we also need long-term solutions to the many issues, including hazardous garbage, that are so interconnected. There are so many systemic issues contributing to our city’s garbage problem but the Progressive Conservative government is not doing nearly enough to address these issues. It has sold off social housing and failed to repair existing social housing, it cut people off from disability and regular EIA benefits, and it has raised Manitoba Hydro rates while letting our minimum wage fall to the lowest in the country by the end of the year. These are the issues my NDP colleagues and I raise in the Legislature every single day.

Bill 222 seeks to close the gender wage-gap

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Preview

Bill 222 seeks to close the gender wage-gap

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Wednesday, Apr. 6, 2022

Everyone deserves equal pay for work of equal value. That is why I have introduced Bill 222 - The Pay Transparency Act, which would require employers to include pay information in publicly advertised job postings and require private sector employers with more than 100 employees to file a pay audit report with the pay equity commissioner, including information on gender, diversity, and pay of employees.

From our own community of Notre Dame to all of Canada, the gender wage-gap is demonstrated in lower wages for women everywhere. It’s time to close the gender wage gap, particularly where it is greatest — for Indigenous, newcomer and racialized women, and women with disabilities. As life keeps getting more expensive for working families we can’t ignore gender discrimination on the pay scale. Women make, on average, 75 cents for every dollar a man makes. Newcomer women earn 71 cents for every dollar a man makes; and Indigenous women make 65 cents for every dollar a man makes.

This bill is the first step to ensure fair pay for all women, gender diverse folks, and racialized groups. Public reporting of positions and pay by the private sector is an important step to help stop pay discrimination in the workplace. Conducting pay audits will make sure employers identify any pay gaps that exist because of gender, race and even disabilities. This bill will do exactly these things — but it will go even further. It will also prevent employers from seeking pay history about potential employees — this initiative will remove one of the tools employers use to pay employees less than they deserve. Bill 222 will also require employers to post salaries on job postings, so that people can accurately compare rates of pay for similar jobs so they can ensure they are being paid fairly.

Communities thrive when everyone is equal. One way we can start chipping away at the gender pay gap is to advance pay transparency and pay equity legislation. This legislation represents a key step forward in the actions necessary to begin closing the gap, which has become increasingly important as the economic impacts of the pandemic unfold. Unfortunately, the Progressive Conservative government spoke out against the bill during debate, but I hope that this will be the first step in the government eventually seeing the benefits of pay equity and lending its support to this bill in the future.

Wednesday, Apr. 6, 2022

Everyone deserves equal pay for work of equal value. That is why I have introduced Bill 222 - The Pay Transparency Act, which would require employers to include pay information in publicly advertised job postings and require private sector employers with more than 100 employees to file a pay audit report with the pay equity commissioner, including information on gender, diversity, and pay of employees.

From our own community of Notre Dame to all of Canada, the gender wage-gap is demonstrated in lower wages for women everywhere. It’s time to close the gender wage gap, particularly where it is greatest — for Indigenous, newcomer and racialized women, and women with disabilities. As life keeps getting more expensive for working families we can’t ignore gender discrimination on the pay scale. Women make, on average, 75 cents for every dollar a man makes. Newcomer women earn 71 cents for every dollar a man makes; and Indigenous women make 65 cents for every dollar a man makes.

This bill is the first step to ensure fair pay for all women, gender diverse folks, and racialized groups. Public reporting of positions and pay by the private sector is an important step to help stop pay discrimination in the workplace. Conducting pay audits will make sure employers identify any pay gaps that exist because of gender, race and even disabilities. This bill will do exactly these things — but it will go even further. It will also prevent employers from seeking pay history about potential employees — this initiative will remove one of the tools employers use to pay employees less than they deserve. Bill 222 will also require employers to post salaries on job postings, so that people can accurately compare rates of pay for similar jobs so they can ensure they are being paid fairly.

Communities thrive when everyone is equal. One way we can start chipping away at the gender pay gap is to advance pay transparency and pay equity legislation. This legislation represents a key step forward in the actions necessary to begin closing the gap, which has become increasingly important as the economic impacts of the pandemic unfold. Unfortunately, the Progressive Conservative government spoke out against the bill during debate, but I hope that this will be the first step in the government eventually seeing the benefits of pay equity and lending its support to this bill in the future.

Full-day kindergarten would benefit Manitobans

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Preview

Full-day kindergarten would benefit Manitobans

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

The Winnipeg School Division recently announced that it would cut its full-day kindergarten pilot program which has been running in 11 of its schools for several years.

The reason given was that, while the program found that children benefited at the beginning of Grade 1, students in the half-day kindergarten program are catching up by the end of Grade 2.

However, the program did not study the economic or social benefits of full-day kindergarten, of which there are many. For example, Manitoba has a huge child-care deficit, and many parents struggle with the logistics of getting kids to a short half day of kindergarten and then to daycare placements, if they are available. Inadequate child care and educational opportunities hurt the workforce and women in particular, an issue which has been exacerbated during this pandemic. This can affect awhole family’s social and economic wellbeing, not just the child’s school academic readiness.

Full-day kindergarten is actually quite common in other Canadian provinces. In eight out of 13 provinces and territories, full-day kindergarten is widely available or even the norm. In Alberta, studies have shown that disadvantaged students benefit greatly from full-day kindergarten, which helped narrow the gap between them and other students. There are so many reasons why Manitoba should make full-day kindergarten more widely available, and it is time for the Progressive Conservative government to invest seriously in our children and families by helping them to have the best possible academic and economic outcomes.

Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

The Winnipeg School Division recently announced that it would cut its full-day kindergarten pilot program which has been running in 11 of its schools for several years.

The reason given was that, while the program found that children benefited at the beginning of Grade 1, students in the half-day kindergarten program are catching up by the end of Grade 2.

However, the program did not study the economic or social benefits of full-day kindergarten, of which there are many. For example, Manitoba has a huge child-care deficit, and many parents struggle with the logistics of getting kids to a short half day of kindergarten and then to daycare placements, if they are available. Inadequate child care and educational opportunities hurt the workforce and women in particular, an issue which has been exacerbated during this pandemic. This can affect awhole family’s social and economic wellbeing, not just the child’s school academic readiness.

Full-day kindergarten is actually quite common in other Canadian provinces. In eight out of 13 provinces and territories, full-day kindergarten is widely available or even the norm. In Alberta, studies have shown that disadvantaged students benefit greatly from full-day kindergarten, which helped narrow the gap between them and other students. There are so many reasons why Manitoba should make full-day kindergarten more widely available, and it is time for the Progressive Conservative government to invest seriously in our children and families by helping them to have the best possible academic and economic outcomes.

Staff shortages a growing problem in child care

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Preview

Staff shortages a growing problem in child care

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Friday, Nov. 26, 2021

There’s a growing labour shortage in Canada, and the child-care sector in Manitoba has not been exempt. I have heard from numerous childcare providers in Notre Dame who are sounding the alarm about the staffing shortages and the many negative effects this has on providing quality child care in our area and our province.

The main reason for the shortage of certified early childhood educators in Manitoba is that many ECEs earn little more than minimum wage because of the provincial government’s five-year funding freeze to the childcare sector — led by former families minister Heather Stefanson. With these low wage prospects, completing the required two-year certificate just doesn’t make sense for most people.

Staffing shortages are directly related to the lack of child-care spaces in Manitoba, because having fewer staff forces child-care centres to reduce enrolment in programs, hours of operation, and results in staff having to work too much overtime.

Many facilities, especially smaller centres, have to close whenever a staff member falls ill because there are not enough substitutes available to cover for them.

Friday, Nov. 26, 2021

There’s a growing labour shortage in Canada, and the child-care sector in Manitoba has not been exempt. I have heard from numerous childcare providers in Notre Dame who are sounding the alarm about the staffing shortages and the many negative effects this has on providing quality child care in our area and our province.

The main reason for the shortage of certified early childhood educators in Manitoba is that many ECEs earn little more than minimum wage because of the provincial government’s five-year funding freeze to the childcare sector — led by former families minister Heather Stefanson. With these low wage prospects, completing the required two-year certificate just doesn’t make sense for most people.

Staffing shortages are directly related to the lack of child-care spaces in Manitoba, because having fewer staff forces child-care centres to reduce enrolment in programs, hours of operation, and results in staff having to work too much overtime.

Many facilities, especially smaller centres, have to close whenever a staff member falls ill because there are not enough substitutes available to cover for them.

Rising food costs creating hardships for Manitobans

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Preview

Rising food costs creating hardships for Manitobans

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Friday, Oct. 29, 2021

If you’ve been to a grocery store in recent months, you’ve probably noticed that the cost of food has gone up significantly. This is largely due to the supply chain disruptions and inflation caused by the pandemic, with overall food prices increasing by 3.9 per cent in the last year. For products such as meat, the cost has gone up almost 10 per cent, and products like oils and margarine have increased by 18.5 per cent.

These prices have hit many Notre Dame residents especially hard, such as low-income families, seniors, and those on fixed incomes, so I want to highlight some of the supports available in the community to help out folks who are struggling to access enough nutritious food for themselves and their families.

Organizations such as the The NorWest Co-op Community Food Centre have been a vital support for many people in our community, especially during the pandemic. They offer several food support programs open to all people in need, without asking for personal information. On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays they offer free, nutritious take-out lunches from noon to 1:30 p.m. and suppers on Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. For more information, visit www.norwestcoop.ca/community-food-centre/

This Centre relies entirely on donations to keep its doors open, so if you are able and willing, you could consider donating your money or time as a volunteer to help support this great organization and our community.

Friday, Oct. 29, 2021

If you’ve been to a grocery store in recent months, you’ve probably noticed that the cost of food has gone up significantly. This is largely due to the supply chain disruptions and inflation caused by the pandemic, with overall food prices increasing by 3.9 per cent in the last year. For products such as meat, the cost has gone up almost 10 per cent, and products like oils and margarine have increased by 18.5 per cent.

These prices have hit many Notre Dame residents especially hard, such as low-income families, seniors, and those on fixed incomes, so I want to highlight some of the supports available in the community to help out folks who are struggling to access enough nutritious food for themselves and their families.

Organizations such as the The NorWest Co-op Community Food Centre have been a vital support for many people in our community, especially during the pandemic. They offer several food support programs open to all people in need, without asking for personal information. On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays they offer free, nutritious take-out lunches from noon to 1:30 p.m. and suppers on Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. For more information, visit www.norwestcoop.ca/community-food-centre/

This Centre relies entirely on donations to keep its doors open, so if you are able and willing, you could consider donating your money or time as a volunteer to help support this great organization and our community.

Thanks to who fought government bills

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Preview

Thanks to who fought government bills

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Friday, Oct. 1, 2021

In only a few days, Manitobans will finally get see five harmful bills officially withdrawn by the Progressive Conservative government.

For months now, my NDP colleagues and I have heard from folks all over the province about their concerns regarding these bills that the PCs were trying to pass.

I talked to so many residents of Notre Dame that were especially worried about how these bills would affect our community.

I am proud to say we stopped Bill 35, which would have made it easier for the government to keep raising your Hydro bills without checking with the experts. Recently, Hydro released its annual report, which shows it is profitable, proving the near three per cent rate increase Manitobans got last December was unnecessary.

Friday, Oct. 1, 2021

In only a few days, Manitobans will finally get see five harmful bills officially withdrawn by the Progressive Conservative government.

For months now, my NDP colleagues and I have heard from folks all over the province about their concerns regarding these bills that the PCs were trying to pass.

I talked to so many residents of Notre Dame that were especially worried about how these bills would affect our community.

I am proud to say we stopped Bill 35, which would have made it easier for the government to keep raising your Hydro bills without checking with the experts. Recently, Hydro released its annual report, which shows it is profitable, proving the near three per cent rate increase Manitobans got last December was unnecessary.

Manitobans need stronger climate leadership

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Preview

Manitobans need stronger climate leadership

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Monday, Sep. 6, 2021

Devastating droughts and smoke-filled skies — this summer Manitobans have begun to experience what the climate crisis will mean for us personally if we don’t take action now.

Manitoba’s greenhouse gas emissions are at an all-time high and are growing quickly under this government. Instead of fighting climate change, the government picks fights with the federal government and wastes money on lengthy court challenges that could be invested in making Manitoba more sustainable.

We know that the climate crisis will be hardest on low-income communities around the world, despite them having the smallest environmental footprint. Here in Notre Dame, there are many families who want to do their part, but can’t afford large expenses like an electric car or retrofitting their home.

Government needs to act now to reduce our province’s emissions and help low-income communities withstand the impacts of climate change.

Monday, Sep. 6, 2021

Devastating droughts and smoke-filled skies — this summer Manitobans have begun to experience what the climate crisis will mean for us personally if we don’t take action now.

Manitoba’s greenhouse gas emissions are at an all-time high and are growing quickly under this government. Instead of fighting climate change, the government picks fights with the federal government and wastes money on lengthy court challenges that could be invested in making Manitoba more sustainable.

We know that the climate crisis will be hardest on low-income communities around the world, despite them having the smallest environmental footprint. Here in Notre Dame, there are many families who want to do their part, but can’t afford large expenses like an electric car or retrofitting their home.

Government needs to act now to reduce our province’s emissions and help low-income communities withstand the impacts of climate change.

Keeping on top of lead levels in Notre Dame

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Preview

Keeping on top of lead levels in Notre Dame

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Monday, Aug. 16, 2021

Since being elected as your MLA in 2019, one of the issues facing our community close to my heart has been lead contamination in our soil.

Lead contamination can have harmful impacts on human health and our fight as a community to get the improvements we need is still ongoing.

Children under seven are most sensitive to lead exposure as their nervous systems are still developing. There can be irreversible effects on learning, behaviour, and intelligence. For adults, long-term lead exposure can contribute to high blood pressure, heart disease, kidney problems and reproductive effects.

In Notre Dame, the field at Weston School on Logan Avenue was closed for three years over concerns about lead in the soil. In spring 2020, the field was re-opened with no work done and children were allowed to play on it. After one and a half years of further community organizing and raising this issue in the legislature, the government finally agreed to conduct remediation at Weston School, which is currently underway and expected to be complete before school starts this fall.

Monday, Aug. 16, 2021

Since being elected as your MLA in 2019, one of the issues facing our community close to my heart has been lead contamination in our soil.

Lead contamination can have harmful impacts on human health and our fight as a community to get the improvements we need is still ongoing.

Children under seven are most sensitive to lead exposure as their nervous systems are still developing. There can be irreversible effects on learning, behaviour, and intelligence. For adults, long-term lead exposure can contribute to high blood pressure, heart disease, kidney problems and reproductive effects.

In Notre Dame, the field at Weston School on Logan Avenue was closed for three years over concerns about lead in the soil. In spring 2020, the field was re-opened with no work done and children were allowed to play on it. After one and a half years of further community organizing and raising this issue in the legislature, the government finally agreed to conduct remediation at Weston School, which is currently underway and expected to be complete before school starts this fall.

Higher Hydro rates and fewer daycare spaces

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Preview

Higher Hydro rates and fewer daycare spaces

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Friday, Jul. 16, 2021

Two weeks ago, the Progressive Conservative government announced it is, yet again, moving forward with increasing Hydro rates on all Manitobans during the pandemic.

In addition to the 2.9 per cent Hydro rate increase in December 2020, the government is planning to increase rates by 2.5 per cent each year for the next three years, without an independent review from the Public Utilities Board.

This means that regular Manitobans — the folks in Notre Dame who own Manitoba Hydro — won’t be able to even explain how higher electricity bills will affect their families, and we won’t know whether Manitobans are being asked to overpay.

To make matters worse, the Public Utilities Ratepayer Protection and Regulatory Reform Act (Bill 35) will force the PUB to approve electricity rates in five-year intervals rather than annually and rate adjustments can be made at the minister’s discretion.

Friday, Jul. 16, 2021

Two weeks ago, the Progressive Conservative government announced it is, yet again, moving forward with increasing Hydro rates on all Manitobans during the pandemic.

In addition to the 2.9 per cent Hydro rate increase in December 2020, the government is planning to increase rates by 2.5 per cent each year for the next three years, without an independent review from the Public Utilities Board.

This means that regular Manitobans — the folks in Notre Dame who own Manitoba Hydro — won’t be able to even explain how higher electricity bills will affect their families, and we won’t know whether Manitobans are being asked to overpay.

To make matters worse, the Public Utilities Ratepayer Protection and Regulatory Reform Act (Bill 35) will force the PUB to approve electricity rates in five-year intervals rather than annually and rate adjustments can be made at the minister’s discretion.

Daniel McIntyre AP program is one of a kind

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Preview

Daniel McIntyre AP program is one of a kind

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Monday, Jun. 21, 2021

As the school year comes to a close, students from Daniel McIntyre Collegiate Institute’s advanced placement capstone program will be graduating at the end of the month.

Although this past year has been very difficult for students across the province, these students have continued to excel academically. 

Daniel McIntyre is the first school in Manitoba to offer this one-of-a-kind AP capstone program, which aims to provide post-secondary level education in a high school setting. The program consists of two parts: an AP seminar portion which students complete in Grade 11 and an AP research portion, which is completed in Grade 12.

In AP seminars, students get to choose the topics they’d like to learn about such as medicine, environmental science, education, political studies, sociology and more. While learning about these topics, they also learn critical academic writing and research skills.

Monday, Jun. 21, 2021

Supplied photo
An AP student paints a mural for the new Muslim prayer room at Daniel McIntyre Collegiate Institute.

Bill 64 will negatively affect Notre Dame students

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Preview

Bill 64 will negatively affect Notre Dame students

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Wednesday, May. 26, 2021

As a parent of two young boys, I am very concerned about the impact the Pallister government’s Bill 64, The Education Modernization Act, will have on public schools in the Notre Dame constituency.

One of the biggest changes is that Winnipeg School Division will no longer exist as it currently does. Instead, big decisions that have historically been made at the local level will now all be made by a ‘Provincial Education Authority’ that is politically appointed by the education minister.

One major concern with this massive change is that Winnipeg School Division and our community will lose control over programming offered at our schools that are specific to the needs of our families. 

WSD provides nutrition programs, adult crossing guards, ‘walking’ school buses, WRENCH bike repair, adult literacy, parenting programs and more. The worry is that the fate of these programs lies with a provincially controlled authority that will not need to consult our community.

Wednesday, May. 26, 2021

As a parent of two young boys, I am very concerned about the impact the Pallister government’s Bill 64, The Education Modernization Act, will have on public schools in the Notre Dame constituency.

One of the biggest changes is that Winnipeg School Division will no longer exist as it currently does. Instead, big decisions that have historically been made at the local level will now all be made by a ‘Provincial Education Authority’ that is politically appointed by the education minister.

One major concern with this massive change is that Winnipeg School Division and our community will lose control over programming offered at our schools that are specific to the needs of our families. 

WSD provides nutrition programs, adult crossing guards, ‘walking’ school buses, WRENCH bike repair, adult literacy, parenting programs and more. The worry is that the fate of these programs lies with a provincially controlled authority that will not need to consult our community.

PC budget fails to protect Manitobans

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Preview

PC budget fails to protect Manitobans

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Monday, Apr. 26, 2021

The Pallister government recently released its 2021 budget, which yet again fails to address Manitobans needs and the issues they face such as safe, affordable personal care homes and returning to work.

Several months after the Premier choked back tears at press conferences as he talked about the tragic deaths that occurred at Parkview Place and Maples, this budget was a real opportunity to remedy many of the problems our facilities face.

However, the 2021 budget seems to forget about PCH residents, as it does nothing to address the problems that caused the tragic outbreaks and deaths at PCHs we saw in fall, such as chronic understaffing, cleanliness and lack of funds. The funding in this budget doesn’t even keep pace with inflation. Our seniors deserve better than this so they can live with dignity and respect.

This budget also fails to provide supports for women and underrepresented groups in job recovery. I know many of my constituents could benefit from supports that help them get back to work like affordable, accessible public child care, so it’s unfortunate that this government hasn’t taken any meaningful action to help them and has instead frozen their funding for the fifth year in a row. 

Monday, Apr. 26, 2021

The Pallister government recently released its 2021 budget, which yet again fails to address Manitobans needs and the issues they face such as safe, affordable personal care homes and returning to work.

Several months after the Premier choked back tears at press conferences as he talked about the tragic deaths that occurred at Parkview Place and Maples, this budget was a real opportunity to remedy many of the problems our facilities face.

However, the 2021 budget seems to forget about PCH residents, as it does nothing to address the problems that caused the tragic outbreaks and deaths at PCHs we saw in fall, such as chronic understaffing, cleanliness and lack of funds. The funding in this budget doesn’t even keep pace with inflation. Our seniors deserve better than this so they can live with dignity and respect.

This budget also fails to provide supports for women and underrepresented groups in job recovery. I know many of my constituents could benefit from supports that help them get back to work like affordable, accessible public child care, so it’s unfortunate that this government hasn’t taken any meaningful action to help them and has instead frozen their funding for the fifth year in a row. 

Filipinos disproportionately hit by COVID-19

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Preview

Filipinos disproportionately hit by COVID-19

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Tuesday, Mar. 30, 2021

The Pallister government failed to release race-based and workplace COVID-19 data to Manitobans for months. Now that this data has been released, it’s confirmed what we already knew — people of colour, specifically Filipinos, have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Filipinos make up the largest share of COVID-19 cases compared to our share of the population in the province. The data also shows that Filipino women were more affected by the virus than other Filipino Manitobans. We currently represent 12 per cent of all COVID-19 cases, even though we only make up seven per cent of the provincial population.

Filipino Manitobans are not simply contracting COVID-19 due to individual behaviour, but largely due to the jobs they work. Many Filipinos, especially women, work in the health-care sector in housekeeping, as health-care aides, nurses, home-care workers, and personal-care home workers.

Additionally, many Filipinos work in food manufacturing, the service industry, as well as in the transportation sector. All these sectors have some of the highest rates of COVID-19 infection in Canada. Filipinos also tend to live in multi-generational households or in tight living quarters, which leads to easier spread of the virus.

Tuesday, Mar. 30, 2021

The Pallister government failed to release race-based and workplace COVID-19 data to Manitobans for months. Now that this data has been released, it’s confirmed what we already knew — people of colour, specifically Filipinos, have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Filipinos make up the largest share of COVID-19 cases compared to our share of the population in the province. The data also shows that Filipino women were more affected by the virus than other Filipino Manitobans. We currently represent 12 per cent of all COVID-19 cases, even though we only make up seven per cent of the provincial population.

Filipino Manitobans are not simply contracting COVID-19 due to individual behaviour, but largely due to the jobs they work. Many Filipinos, especially women, work in the health-care sector in housekeeping, as health-care aides, nurses, home-care workers, and personal-care home workers.

Additionally, many Filipinos work in food manufacturing, the service industry, as well as in the transportation sector. All these sectors have some of the highest rates of COVID-19 infection in Canada. Filipinos also tend to live in multi-generational households or in tight living quarters, which leads to easier spread of the virus.

We need lead contamination assurances

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Preview

We need lead contamination assurances

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Tuesday, Mar. 2, 2021

As some of you may know, Weston School on Logan Avenue closed its sports field for three years waiting for results from the province’s commissioned report on lead-contaminated soil in Winnipeg. 

That report made specific recommendations for the Weston School yard and sports field, including a lead prevention public awareness campaign, further soil testing, and a seasonal landscaping maintenance plan for school grounds and green spaces in the community. 

Unfortunately, the sports field was re-opened afterwards without any of these recommendations being followed. We were told at the time (February 2020) by the province that the school field is safe to re-open and no work is necessary on the school grounds since it was only closed out of an “abundance of caution.”

Now, after a year of advocacy requesting the province to protect our community from lead exposure, there has finally been a tender posted by the Winnipeg School Division for a contract for a lead maintenance plan for landscaping the Weston School grounds which would include excavation and disposal of lead contaminated soils, replacement of clean fill and reinstallation of site elements.

Tuesday, Mar. 2, 2021

As some of you may know, Weston School on Logan Avenue closed its sports field for three years waiting for results from the province’s commissioned report on lead-contaminated soil in Winnipeg. 

That report made specific recommendations for the Weston School yard and sports field, including a lead prevention public awareness campaign, further soil testing, and a seasonal landscaping maintenance plan for school grounds and green spaces in the community. 

Unfortunately, the sports field was re-opened afterwards without any of these recommendations being followed. We were told at the time (February 2020) by the province that the school field is safe to re-open and no work is necessary on the school grounds since it was only closed out of an “abundance of caution.”

Now, after a year of advocacy requesting the province to protect our community from lead exposure, there has finally been a tender posted by the Winnipeg School Division for a contract for a lead maintenance plan for landscaping the Weston School grounds which would include excavation and disposal of lead contaminated soils, replacement of clean fill and reinstallation of site elements.

Mentoring opportunities in Notre Dame

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Preview

Mentoring opportunities in Notre Dame

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Monday, Feb. 1, 2021

While community outreach activities continue to be disrupted by COVID-19, we are excited to announce that we recently began setting up youth mentorships that virtually link youth with professionals over Zoom.

So far, we’ve set up three first-year University of Manitoba students - all graduates of Daniel McIntyre Collegiate - with mentors. The students expressed interest in medicine, psychiatry, psychology, addictions, mental health and youth so we found mentors who reflected these interests.

The mentors are health professionals, including a doctor in residence, a psychiatric nurse who specializes in working with youth and addictions, and a forensic psychologist who also specializes in working with youth.

The mentors share the education and career paths they took and what their day-to-day work is like. All three students are young Filipina women and their mentors also come from similar ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. This matching was done by design and allowed for more personal, in-depth exchanges between students and mentors as they explored topics like family, cultural expectations, and ways to find work and other opportunities to finance their university degrees.

Monday, Feb. 1, 2021

While community outreach activities continue to be disrupted by COVID-19, we are excited to announce that we recently began setting up youth mentorships that virtually link youth with professionals over Zoom.

So far, we’ve set up three first-year University of Manitoba students - all graduates of Daniel McIntyre Collegiate - with mentors. The students expressed interest in medicine, psychiatry, psychology, addictions, mental health and youth so we found mentors who reflected these interests.

The mentors are health professionals, including a doctor in residence, a psychiatric nurse who specializes in working with youth and addictions, and a forensic psychologist who also specializes in working with youth.

The mentors share the education and career paths they took and what their day-to-day work is like. All three students are young Filipina women and their mentors also come from similar ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. This matching was done by design and allowed for more personal, in-depth exchanges between students and mentors as they explored topics like family, cultural expectations, and ways to find work and other opportunities to finance their university degrees.

Province must act on lead contamination

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Preview

Province must act on lead contamination

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2020

Over the past year, I’ve been meeting with constituents and experts to discuss the issue of lead contamination in the Notre Dame area and several other Winnipeg neighbourhoods, including Point Douglas and St. Boniface.

Children who are seven and under are the most sensitive to the side effects of lead exposure as their nervous systems are still developing. These effects are irreversible and can include effects on learning, behaviour and intelligence. For adults, long-term lead exposure can contribute to high blood pressure, heart disease, kidney problems and reproductive effects.

Although the risk of lead exposure is not very high, the risk is still there. Unfortunately, there is currently no plan in place to deal with lead-in-soil, nor is there a public awareness campaign educating residents on how they can reduce their risks of lead exposure. Instead, people in these areas continue to garden and work in the soil, and children continue to play in the dirt and leaves, often without any knowledge of the risks associated with doing so.

Certain Winnipeg neighbourhoods in Notre Dame are disproportionately affected by lead exposure due to past industrial activity in the area, such as lead smelting and scrap yards.

Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2020

File photo by Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press
The field at Weston School was fenced off from the concrete play area lead levels of more than 1,000 mg/g lead levels were found in some parts in September 2018. The government must act on this contamination immediately, Notre Dame MLA Malaya Marcelino writes.

Government should take over long-term care homes

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Preview

Government should take over long-term care homes

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Friday, Dec. 4, 2020

The NDP recently introduced a motion in the legislature urging the government to immediately take over management of Revera’s long-term care homes such as Maples and Parkview, which I spoke on.

Long-term care homes across Manitoba have been overwhelmed by the second wave of the pandemic but the outbreaks at Revera’s for-profit facilities have been the worst by far.

It is no surprise that the worst outbreaks have been at Revera-owned and operated care homes as their staff, and residents and their loved ones all cited concerns with living conditions and understaffing even before the pandemic.

Unfortunately, owing to the pandemic, where there were cracks there are now holes.

Friday, Dec. 4, 2020

The NDP recently introduced a motion in the legislature urging the government to immediately take over management of Revera’s long-term care homes such as Maples and Parkview, which I spoke on.

Long-term care homes across Manitoba have been overwhelmed by the second wave of the pandemic but the outbreaks at Revera’s for-profit facilities have been the worst by far.

It is no surprise that the worst outbreaks have been at Revera-owned and operated care homes as their staff, and residents and their loved ones all cited concerns with living conditions and understaffing even before the pandemic.

Unfortunately, owing to the pandemic, where there were cracks there are now holes.

The new Canada Sickness Benefit

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Preview

The new Canada Sickness Benefit

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 3 minute read Friday, Nov. 13, 2020

Thanks to a deal struck by Jagmeet Singh, the leader of the federal New Democratic Party, the federal government recently announced its plan for national paid sick leave, which will be delivered through the Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit. If you are sick, but can’t afford to take time off, you don’t have to compromise anymore — you can now stay home and continue earning money for you and your family, without repercussion from your employer.                           

How will Manitobans benefit? Manitoba workers who do not already receive paid sick leave from their employer will have access to $500 a week for up to two weeks total if they meet certain requirements, including being unable to work at least 50 per cent of their scheduled work week for one of several reasons. These reasons are:

You are sick with COVID-19 or may have COVID-19;You are advised to self-isolate due to COVID-19 by your employer, the government or a medical professional; orYou have an underlying health condition that puts yourself at greater risk of getting COVID-19, as advised by the government or medical professional.When can Manitobans access this benefit? Manitobans can apply right now up until Sept. 25, 2021.

To apply/for more information please visit the page titled Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit on the Government of Canada website: www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/benefits/recovery-sickness-benefit.html

Friday, Nov. 13, 2020

Thanks to a deal struck by Jagmeet Singh, the leader of the federal New Democratic Party, the federal government recently announced its plan for national paid sick leave, which will be delivered through the Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit. If you are sick, but can’t afford to take time off, you don’t have to compromise anymore — you can now stay home and continue earning money for you and your family, without repercussion from your employer.                           

How will Manitobans benefit? Manitoba workers who do not already receive paid sick leave from their employer will have access to $500 a week for up to two weeks total if they meet certain requirements, including being unable to work at least 50 per cent of their scheduled work week for one of several reasons. These reasons are:

You are sick with COVID-19 or may have COVID-19;You are advised to self-isolate due to COVID-19 by your employer, the government or a medical professional; orYou have an underlying health condition that puts yourself at greater risk of getting COVID-19, as advised by the government or medical professional.When can Manitobans access this benefit? Manitobans can apply right now up until Sept. 25, 2021.

To apply/for more information please visit the page titled Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit on the Government of Canada website: www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/benefits/recovery-sickness-benefit.html

Brookside Cemetery tour teaches history

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Preview

Brookside Cemetery tour teaches history

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Friday, Oct. 9, 2020

Last week I had the pleasure of taking part in a tour of Brookside Cemetery, located at 3001 Notre Dame Ave.

The tour was hosted by Paul Moist, a former president of the Canadian Union of Public Employees.

The topic of the tour was the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike, as several prominent leaders of the movement are buried there.

Paul used his extensive knowledge of the history of social movements and labour to educate us on the strike, teaching us that it was the largest general strike in Canadian history, with 20 per cent of all Winnipeggers (35,000 workers) taking part.

Friday, Oct. 9, 2020

Supplied photo
Paul Moist (above) regularly leads tours of Brookside Cemetery, where many prominent participants in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike are buried.

Health and security top concern for residents

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Preview

Health and security top concern for residents

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Monday, Sep. 21, 2020

I connected for the first time with residents of 515 Elgin Ave., a 100-suite, 55-plus, Manitoba Housing high-rise this past spring during a food donation drive that our office organized with generous church members from Iglesia ni Cristo. 

During my visits to the building and in letters that residents wrote to me, I was informed by the older adults who live there that they no longer feel safe in their building. 

According to numerous residents, many vulnerable community members, usually women, have been entering the building as a place to seek shelter, use drugs and go to the bathroom in stairwells or in the laundry room. The residents feel for these individuals, as they know there is a need for more community shelter and addictions support from our government. But they are concerned because of incidents of harassment and theft, as well as illegal drug sales.

On Aug. 18, I met with the building’s tenants’ association committee to listen to residents’ concerns and also to do some brainstorming about ideas and solutions they might have regarding their home and community. 

Monday, Sep. 21, 2020

Supplied photo
MLA Malaya Marcelino (Notre Dame), meets with 515 Elgin Ave. tenants’ association committee.

A healthier community — one bike at a time

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Preview

A healthier community — one bike at a time

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Monday, Aug. 17, 2020

Over the spring and summer months, I have been working very closely with an organization in the Notre Dame constituency that does really great work.

The Winnipeg Repair Education and Cycling Hub, also known as The WRENCH, builds, repairs, and helps to maintain bikes. They sell, rent, and donate their bikes, not just to individual people, but they even have entire fleets available for businesses.

Bicycles are a fantastic way to participate in active transportation. We know that getting around by bike is healthy not only for ourselves but for the environment and our community, as well. In cities around the world where bike use is more common, traffic congestion lightens up and air pollution is reduced.

The WRENCH is a permanent fixture of Hugh John Macdonald School, where staff and volunteers provide skills and training to students. They also do community outreach events such as  cycling safety workshops and bike giveaway/tune-up events which they have held at IRCOM and Rossbrook House.

Monday, Aug. 17, 2020

Supplied photo
Notre Dame MLA Malaya Marcelino is pictured here with Geoff Health, educational director of The WRENCH, and WRENCH summer staff member Dylan Nicolau.

Should the speed limit on residential streets be lowered?

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Preview

Should the speed limit on residential streets be lowered?

Malaya Marcelino - MLA for Notre Dame 2 minute read Monday, Jul. 20, 2020

In Notre Dame there are far too many traffic accidents and collisions. Pedestrians are often seriously injured and there have also been fatalities, including those of young children.

Our community is ready to make the streets safer for all of us, especially for our kids. That’s why I am working with Safe Speeds Winnipeg and promoting its #Love30on30 campaign to raise awareness of the benefits of lowering residential speed limits in our city.

Our community has been very active in campaigning to reduce the residential speed limit.

Many of you may have been seeing a team of dedicated volunteers out canvassing in the neighbourhood every Friday.

Monday, Jul. 20, 2020

Supplied photo
Elizabeth Chubb, a Notre Dame advocate for Safer Speeds Safer Streets, was struck by a speeding vehicle two months ago.