Markus Chambers

Markus Chambers

St. Norbert - Seine River ward report

Markus Chambers is deputy mayor of the City of Winnipeg and city councillor for St. Norbert – Seine River.

Recent articles of Markus Chambers

City poised for economic rebound

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Preview

City poised for economic rebound

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Wednesday, Mar. 23, 2022

Last November, Winnipeg city councillors voted to adopt an exhaustive, two-year strategy to boost economic activity and support businesses dealt a blow by the COVID-19 pandemic.

As we ease cautiously from the two-year fog of this pandemic, it is crucial that the city focuses all efforts on kickstarting our economy and moves Winnipeg forward with projects that support economic recovery and sustainability.

There are two distinct interests — downtown and the city’s 15 wards. In support of Winnipeg businesses, we are continuing to increase the small business tax credit threshold, and will continue the temporary patio program and waiver of fees until the end of 2022.

In collaboration with downtown community stakeholders including businesses, Business Improvement Zones and various social service agencies, priority projects have been identified that will assist in lessening the economic impact to area businesses and downtown residents.

Wednesday, Mar. 23, 2022

Winnipeg’s economic recovery strategy for recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic includes encourage companies and workers to return to their office spaces.

Let’s support one another in this difficult time

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Preview

Let’s support one another in this difficult time

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Friday, Dec. 31, 2021

I wish to start by wishing everyone the very best of the holiday season, hoping that 2022 brings much happiness, health, prosperity and much needed travel when appropriate.

The Province of Manitoba introduced new health restrictions which came into effect on Dec. 21, 2021. These restrictions are in place until Jan. 11, 2022 with further review as circumstances dictate. The Omicron variant now in every province in Canada has forced the hands of every provincial government to enact enhanced restrictions at this critical time as the transmissibility rate of this strain spreads much quicker than the previous Delta variant. 

Although many residents anticipated a relatively normal holiday season, the additional restrictions have placed us where we were at this time last year (although larger family gatherings are allowed this season).

The new restrictions and uncertainty of how they will affect us, as well as when this will all end, impacts our mental health and wellbeing. If you are feeling overwhelmed, there are resources available to help including:

Friday, Dec. 31, 2021

I wish to start by wishing everyone the very best of the holiday season, hoping that 2022 brings much happiness, health, prosperity and much needed travel when appropriate.

The Province of Manitoba introduced new health restrictions which came into effect on Dec. 21, 2021. These restrictions are in place until Jan. 11, 2022 with further review as circumstances dictate. The Omicron variant now in every province in Canada has forced the hands of every provincial government to enact enhanced restrictions at this critical time as the transmissibility rate of this strain spreads much quicker than the previous Delta variant. 

Although many residents anticipated a relatively normal holiday season, the additional restrictions have placed us where we were at this time last year (although larger family gatherings are allowed this season).

The new restrictions and uncertainty of how they will affect us, as well as when this will all end, impacts our mental health and wellbeing. If you are feeling overwhelmed, there are resources available to help including:

Let’s support one another in this difficult time

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Preview

Let’s support one another in this difficult time

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Tuesday, Dec. 28, 2021

I wish to start by wishing everyone the very best of the holiday season, hoping that 2022 brings much happiness, health, prosperity and much needed travel when appropriate.

The Province of Manitoba introduced new health restrictions which came into effect on Dec. 21, 2021. These restrictions are in place until Jan. 11, 2022 with further review as circumstances dictate. The Omicron variant now in every province in Canada has forced the hands of every provincial government to enact enhanced restrictions at this critical time as the transmissibility rate of this strain spreads much quicker than the previous Delta variant.  

Although many residents anticipated a relatively normal holiday season, the additional restrictions have placed us where we were at this time last year (although larger family gatherings are allowed this season).

The new restrictions and uncertainty of how they will affect us, as well as when this will all end, impacts our mental health and wellbeing. If you are feeling overwhelmed, there are resources available to help including:

Tuesday, Dec. 28, 2021

I wish to start by wishing everyone the very best of the holiday season, hoping that 2022 brings much happiness, health, prosperity and much needed travel when appropriate.

The Province of Manitoba introduced new health restrictions which came into effect on Dec. 21, 2021. These restrictions are in place until Jan. 11, 2022 with further review as circumstances dictate. The Omicron variant now in every province in Canada has forced the hands of every provincial government to enact enhanced restrictions at this critical time as the transmissibility rate of this strain spreads much quicker than the previous Delta variant.  

Although many residents anticipated a relatively normal holiday season, the additional restrictions have placed us where we were at this time last year (although larger family gatherings are allowed this season).

The new restrictions and uncertainty of how they will affect us, as well as when this will all end, impacts our mental health and wellbeing. If you are feeling overwhelmed, there are resources available to help including:

Still time to have your say on the city budget

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Preview

Still time to have your say on the city budget

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 3, 2021

Winnipeg City Council will be tabling a budget update to the four-year, multi-year budget on Nov. 26, which will be voted on at a special meeting of council on Dec. 15.

This budget update takes into consideration the challenges of revenue income as a result of the global pandemic, while recognizing the importance of maintaining critical services to the citizens Winnipeg.

I would like to applaud the efforts of our finance chair Scott Gillingham (St. James) for working with all members of council to bring forward ward-specific priorities and city-wide initiatives to be discussed for consideration by the budget working group.

Residents of the St. Norbert-Seine River ward have been quite clear of their priorities, identifying public safety, infrastructure renewal and maintenance, increasing local amenities, climate action goals, the vibrancy and livability of our neighbourhoods as community wellness. 

Friday, Dec. 3, 2021

Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press
Winnipeg City Council, seen here in a file photo from April 2021, will vote on its latest budget update on Dec. 15.

Still time to have your say on the city budget

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Preview

Still time to have your say on the city budget

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021

Winnipeg City Council will be tabling a budget update to the four-year, multi-year budget on Nov. 26, which will be voted on at a special meeting of council on Dec. 15.

This budget update takes into consideration the challenges of revenue income as a result of the global pandemic, while recognizing the importance of maintaining critical services to the citizens Winnipeg.

I would like to applaud the efforts of our finance chair Scott Gillingham (St. James) for working with all members of council to bring forward ward-specific priorities and city-wide initiatives to be discussed for consideration by the budget working group.

Residents of the St. Norbert-Seine River ward have been quite clear of their priorities, identifying public safety, infrastructure renewal and maintenance, increasing local amenities, climate action goals, the vibrancy and livability of our neighbourhoods as community wellness.  City services including, but not limited to, garbage pickup, snow clearing, transit, police, fire/paramedics are funded in part by property taxes. Each city department receives a budget allocation to meet the mandated services under the City of Winnipeg Charter. There are also services that are not mandated under the charter that still have an impact on resources.

Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021

Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press
Winnipeg City Council, seen here in a file photo from April 2021, will vote on its latest budget update on Dec. 15.

Traffic safety improvements in River Park South

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Preview

Traffic safety improvements in River Park South

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2021

Residents of River Park South have a new pedestrian half-signal that spans St. Anne’s Road along the active transportation trailway leading to the Seine River.

The installation of this important traffic infrastructure will improve the safety of many pedestrians, cyclists and motorists as the signal will alert motorists to slow down and stop to allow pedestrians and cyclists to cross safely.  

Increased vehicle volumes in the south area of the city have dramatically affected traffic conditions and the ability of pedestrians and cyclists to safely cross many roadways. Once the motion to address traffic safety was approved, there were several discussions with the traffic engineering department to decide which treatment would be most effective in mitigating safety concerns.

There are essentially four types of pedestrian corridor treatments that have been used in the City of Winnipegm including fround-mounted signs, rectangular rapid flashing beacons (RRFB), pedestrian corridors (overhead flashing beacons) or half- or full-signal lights. The decision to use a half-signal took into consideration the two full-signal lights at the intersections directly north and south of this crossing and the importance of maintaining the flow of traffic during peak hours.  

Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2021

Supplied photo
Coun. Markus Chambers (Seine River-St. Norbert), at left, and Coun. Matt Allard (St. Boniface) turn on a new pedestrian half-signal on St. Anne's Road.

Expanding our sports and recreation offerings

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Preview

Expanding our sports and recreation offerings

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Friday, Oct. 8, 2021

Our city’s community centres will be experiencing a renaissance as we begin efforts to re-open with vaccination uptake increasing. 

The shutdown of our sports fields and community centres over the last 18 months has had a devastating effect on our physical health and well-being, as well as our mental health. Our children and youth need outlets to build life skills while remaining physically active.

When my family emigrated to Canada from England in the late ’60s, my father asked local residents what they did to keep children occupied and active. The answer was hockey in the winter and soccer in the summer. That was the regime my brother and I had throughout our formative years; one I maintained until just recently.

As our city continues to grow through immigration, it is important to embrace other sports that are enjoyed around the world, that may not be part of our current sports offerings. Over the last five to 10 years, I have noticed an increase in sports such as disc golf, beach volleyball, cricket and skateboarding. 

Friday, Oct. 8, 2021

Our city’s community centres will be experiencing a renaissance as we begin efforts to re-open with vaccination uptake increasing. 

The shutdown of our sports fields and community centres over the last 18 months has had a devastating effect on our physical health and well-being, as well as our mental health. Our children and youth need outlets to build life skills while remaining physically active.

When my family emigrated to Canada from England in the late ’60s, my father asked local residents what they did to keep children occupied and active. The answer was hockey in the winter and soccer in the summer. That was the regime my brother and I had throughout our formative years; one I maintained until just recently.

As our city continues to grow through immigration, it is important to embrace other sports that are enjoyed around the world, that may not be part of our current sports offerings. Over the last five to 10 years, I have noticed an increase in sports such as disc golf, beach volleyball, cricket and skateboarding. 

Expanding our sports and recreation offerings

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Preview

Expanding our sports and recreation offerings

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021

Our city’s community centres will be experiencing a renaissance as we begin efforts to re-open with vaccination uptake increasing.  

The shutdown of our sports fields and community centres over the last 18 months has had a devastating affect on our physical health and well-being ,as well as our mental health. Our children and youth need outlets to build life skills while remaining physically active.

When my family emigrated to Canada from England in the late ’60s, my father asked local residents what they did to keep children occupied and active. The answer was hockey in the winter and soccer in the summer. That was the regime my brother and I had throughout our formative years; one I maintained until just recently.

As our city continues to grow through immigration, it is important to embrace other sports that are enjoyed around the world, that may not be part of our current sports offerings. Over the last five to 10 years, I have noticed an increase in sports such as disc golf, beach volleyball, cricket and skateboarding.  

Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021

Our city’s community centres will be experiencing a renaissance as we begin efforts to re-open with vaccination uptake increasing.  

The shutdown of our sports fields and community centres over the last 18 months has had a devastating affect on our physical health and well-being ,as well as our mental health. Our children and youth need outlets to build life skills while remaining physically active.

When my family emigrated to Canada from England in the late ’60s, my father asked local residents what they did to keep children occupied and active. The answer was hockey in the winter and soccer in the summer. That was the regime my brother and I had throughout our formative years; one I maintained until just recently.

As our city continues to grow through immigration, it is important to embrace other sports that are enjoyed around the world, that may not be part of our current sports offerings. Over the last five to 10 years, I have noticed an increase in sports such as disc golf, beach volleyball, cricket and skateboarding.  

Time for vigilance to keep children safe

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Preview

Time for vigilance to keep children safe

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Friday, Sep. 10, 2021

September is here and children and university students will be returning to the halls and classrooms of many institutions across our city.

Many school divisions have made the decision to maintain mandatory masks for students and staff out of an abundance of caution.

School division administrators have stated that a provincial mask mandate, supported by a public health order, would create a more effective and consistent understanding of what is required. School divisions also recognize the vast majority of parents and guardians want to be informed and up to speed on all aspects of their children’s education and safety as we course our way through this pandemic.

Regardless of where you stand on the vaccination or mask debate, children under age 12 now represent a large majority of our unvaccinated population. Not only are they potentially susceptible to the variant strains of COVID-19, but there is also the added concerns of the regular cold and flu season that accompanies the colder fall weather.

Friday, Sep. 10, 2021

Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press
Children under the age of 12 now represent a majority of the unvaccinated population, and schools are working hard to keep them safe.

A field of dreams at Highbury School

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Preview

A field of dreams at Highbury School

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Thursday, Aug. 12, 2021

I am happy to have partnered with St. Vital councillor Brian Mayes and the Bonivital Minor Baseball Association to upgrade the baseball diamond at Highbury School.  

A major renovation has seen significant upgrades at the ballpark to create a refreshed high-performance baseball diamond.  This upgrade project will see a raised mound, refreshed infield, a brand-new warning track and an upgraded backstop and dugout as well as enhanced fencing in the outfield.  

Designed for AA and AAA 18U, 15U, and 13U baseball, this high-performance field will be the gem of South St. Vital.  

Staff continue to work on addressing additional safety enhancements, which include planting trees along the third base line beside the warning track to protect the homes adjacent to the field. Additional fencing will also separate the ball diamond from the adjoining soccer field directly to the west.

Thursday, Aug. 12, 2021

Supplied photo
Bonivital Blacksox 13U AAA players (from left) Quinn Legace, Cole Pritchard and Jackson Bailor were pictured recently with Coun. Markus Chambers (St. Norbert - Seine River) at the newly refurbished baseball diamond at Highbury School.

A message to 2021 graduates

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Preview

A message to 2021 graduates

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Thursday, Jul. 15, 2021

I would like to take this opportunity to offer special congratulations to all our graduating students in St. Norbert-Seine River ward.

Regardless of the challenges and sacrifices brought on as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to recognize what an important accomplishment and milestone this is for you, your family, your friends and your community. I hope that as you go forward in life, you will reflect on your secondary school experience and enter this next phase with more confidence and less doubt.

At this stage of your life, it is very important that you take charge of your future, and that you are an active participant in the planning of your future. Set goals and accomplish tasks that allow you to measure progress and make any adjustments along the way. If there is one thing that this past 18 months has taught us - it is the unpredictability of life. Setting goals for yourself gives you purpose and allows you to stay focused. Do not let anyone or anything deter you from achieving them.

As you get older and accept more responsibility, it will become increasingly important where you choose to focus your time and energy as it will directly impact what comes to you later in life. Volunteering in your community will always yield positive results for you and your community. Volunteering now is an investment in your future that will inevitably provide you with new skills and a network of like-minded individuals who see the value in connecting with one’s community.

Thursday, Jul. 15, 2021

I would like to take this opportunity to offer special congratulations to all our graduating students in St. Norbert-Seine River ward.

Regardless of the challenges and sacrifices brought on as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to recognize what an important accomplishment and milestone this is for you, your family, your friends and your community. I hope that as you go forward in life, you will reflect on your secondary school experience and enter this next phase with more confidence and less doubt.

At this stage of your life, it is very important that you take charge of your future, and that you are an active participant in the planning of your future. Set goals and accomplish tasks that allow you to measure progress and make any adjustments along the way. If there is one thing that this past 18 months has taught us - it is the unpredictability of life. Setting goals for yourself gives you purpose and allows you to stay focused. Do not let anyone or anything deter you from achieving them.

As you get older and accept more responsibility, it will become increasingly important where you choose to focus your time and energy as it will directly impact what comes to you later in life. Volunteering in your community will always yield positive results for you and your community. Volunteering now is an investment in your future that will inevitably provide you with new skills and a network of like-minded individuals who see the value in connecting with one’s community.

Historical perspective is always changing

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Preview

Historical perspective is always changing

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Thursday, Jun. 17, 2021

The debate about removing historical names from streets, statues and other place markers has loudly reached the floor of Winnipeg city council since the revelation of the mass graves of 215 Indigenous children were discovered on the grounds of the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation in British Columbia, at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School.

Names such as Bishop Grandin, Adolphus Egerton Ryerson, Hector-Louis Langevin and other prominent figures who advocated for the creation of residential schools are being challenged on the basis of their role in our country’s history. The call to remove their names from buildings, streets and other place markers is not new, but the voices are now amplified and we hear the anger and outrage behind the cries for change and justice.

The City of Winnipeg is committed to engaging with community organizations, particularly Indigenous groups, to move forward on our journey of reconciliation.

 I was fortunate to be elected to council when we approved the establishment of the Welcoming Winnipeg Initiative to assist in the City of Winnipeg’s journey towards reconciliation.  

Thursday, Jun. 17, 2021

The debate about removing historical names from streets, statues and other place markers has loudly reached the floor of Winnipeg city council since the revelation of the mass graves of 215 Indigenous children were discovered on the grounds of the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation in British Columbia, at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School.

Names such as Bishop Grandin, Adolphus Egerton Ryerson, Hector-Louis Langevin and other prominent figures who advocated for the creation of residential schools are being challenged on the basis of their role in our country’s history. The call to remove their names from buildings, streets and other place markers is not new, but the voices are now amplified and we hear the anger and outrage behind the cries for change and justice.

The City of Winnipeg is committed to engaging with community organizations, particularly Indigenous groups, to move forward on our journey of reconciliation.

 I was fortunate to be elected to council when we approved the establishment of the Welcoming Winnipeg Initiative to assist in the City of Winnipeg’s journey towards reconciliation.  

Historical perspective is always changing

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Preview

Historical perspective is always changing

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Saturday, Jun. 12, 2021

The debate about removing historical names from streets, statues and other place markers has loudly reached the floor of Winnipeg city council since the revelation of the mass graves of 215 Indigenous children were discovered on the grounds of the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation in British Columbia, at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School.

Names such as Bishop Grandin, Adolphus Egerton Ryerson, Hector-Louis Langevin and other prominent figures who advocated for the creation of residential schools are being challenged on the basis of their role in our country’s history. The call to remove their names from buildings, streets and other place markers is not new, but the voices are now amplified and we hear the anger and outrage behind the cries for change and justice.

The City of Winnipeg is committed to engaging with community organizations, particularly Indigenous groups, to move forward on our journey of reconciliation. 

I was fortunate to be elected to council when we approved the establishment of the Welcoming Winnipeg Initiative to assist in the City of Winnipeg’s journey towards reconciliation. 

Saturday, Jun. 12, 2021

File photo
Many are calling for the name of Bishop Grandin Boulevard to be changed.

Greenspace key to healthy, vibrant Winnipeg

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Preview

Greenspace key to healthy, vibrant Winnipeg

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Wednesday, May. 19, 2021

Over the next couple of weeks, council will be debating the proposed OurWinnipeg bylaw 2045.

OurWinnipeg is the City’s development document, which sets a vision for the next 25 years. An important component of these documents is land use, including greenspace and major open spaces, and the City’s plans for land as our population grows steadily toward one million people.

Why is greenspace and the consideration of biodiversity so important to our city? Biodiversity is the rich variety of life on earth. There is variety in genes, variety in species and variety in ecosystems. Much like a spider’s web, everything is interconnected.

Winnipeg’s local ecosystem requires a healthy balance of living things to thrive and build resiliency. As an example, plants require plenty of sunlight and rain as well as healthy soil full of nutrients. Bees and other insects feed on the plants, helping pollinate and make seeds. Local wildlife animal such as deer, rabbits, and grasshoppers eat the plants as well and return nutrients to the soil making it a healthy place for plants to grow and thrive.

Wednesday, May. 19, 2021

Over the next couple of weeks, council will be debating the proposed OurWinnipeg bylaw 2045.

OurWinnipeg is the City’s development document, which sets a vision for the next 25 years. An important component of these documents is land use, including greenspace and major open spaces, and the City’s plans for land as our population grows steadily toward one million people.

Why is greenspace and the consideration of biodiversity so important to our city? Biodiversity is the rich variety of life on earth. There is variety in genes, variety in species and variety in ecosystems. Much like a spider’s web, everything is interconnected.

Winnipeg’s local ecosystem requires a healthy balance of living things to thrive and build resiliency. As an example, plants require plenty of sunlight and rain as well as healthy soil full of nutrients. Bees and other insects feed on the plants, helping pollinate and make seeds. Local wildlife animal such as deer, rabbits, and grasshoppers eat the plants as well and return nutrients to the soil making it a healthy place for plants to grow and thrive.

Green space key to healthy, vibrant Winnipeg

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Preview

Green space key to healthy, vibrant Winnipeg

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Tuesday, May. 18, 2021

Over the next couple of weeks, council will be debating the proposed OurWinnipeg bylaw 2045.

OurWinnipeg is the City’s development document, which sets a vision for the next 25 years. An important component of these documents is land use, including green space and major open spaces, and the City’s plans for land as our population grows steadily toward one million people.

Why is green space and the consideration of biodiversity so important to our city? Biodiversity is the rich variety of life on earth. There is variety in genes, variety in species and variety in ecosystems. Much like a spider’s web, everything is interconnected.

Winnipeg’s local ecosystem requires a healthy balance of living things to thrive and build resiliency. As an example, plants require plenty of sunlight and rain as well as healthy soil full of nutrients. Bees and other insects feed on the plants, helping pollinate and make seeds. Local wildlife such as deer, rabbits, and grasshoppers eat the plants as well and return nutrients to the soil making it a healthy place for plants to grow and thrive.

Tuesday, May. 18, 2021

Over the next couple of weeks, council will be debating the proposed OurWinnipeg bylaw 2045.

OurWinnipeg is the City’s development document, which sets a vision for the next 25 years. An important component of these documents is land use, including green space and major open spaces, and the City’s plans for land as our population grows steadily toward one million people.

Why is green space and the consideration of biodiversity so important to our city? Biodiversity is the rich variety of life on earth. There is variety in genes, variety in species and variety in ecosystems. Much like a spider’s web, everything is interconnected.

Winnipeg’s local ecosystem requires a healthy balance of living things to thrive and build resiliency. As an example, plants require plenty of sunlight and rain as well as healthy soil full of nutrients. Bees and other insects feed on the plants, helping pollinate and make seeds. Local wildlife such as deer, rabbits, and grasshoppers eat the plants as well and return nutrients to the soil making it a healthy place for plants to grow and thrive.

Together we can build a safer community

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Preview

Together we can build a safer community

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Wednesday, Apr. 21, 2021

The emergence of the warmer spring weather (last week’s now notwithstanding) has hastened many of the activities associated with being outdoors.

I have been monitoring social media and have noted an increase in reports of property crime. Unfortunately, it is inevitable that all areas of the city of Winnipeg will see a rise in property related crime throughout the spring and summer months.

Winnipeggers want to feel safe and secure in their homes and neighbourhoods. It’s essential that we all work together to secure and maintain not only the perception of safety but the reality of safety for our families.

Recognizing the potential within the community to foster safety and well-being we must work closely with members of the Winnipeg Police Service to identify current and emerging threats to community safety and security to establish the first step in creating effective strategies.  

Wednesday, Apr. 21, 2021

The emergence of the warmer spring weather (last week’s now notwithstanding) has hastened many of the activities associated with being outdoors.

I have been monitoring social media and have noted an increase in reports of property crime. Unfortunately, it is inevitable that all areas of the city of Winnipeg will see a rise in property related crime throughout the spring and summer months.

Winnipeggers want to feel safe and secure in their homes and neighbourhoods. It’s essential that we all work together to secure and maintain not only the perception of safety but the reality of safety for our families.

Recognizing the potential within the community to foster safety and well-being we must work closely with members of the Winnipeg Police Service to identify current and emerging threats to community safety and security to establish the first step in creating effective strategies.  

All Zoomed out

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Preview

All Zoomed out

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Monday, Mar. 22, 2021

Manitoba’s first presumptive case of COVID-19 was identified on March 12, 2020. Our world as we knew it was about to change in a way we had never imagined.

First of all, I would like to acknowledge the dedication and hard work of our front-line responders who, throughout this year, have put it on the line day in day out.

Secondly, I would like to acknowledge all of the families who have lost loved ones to COVID-19 and who have not had the opportunity to grieve in a way that celebrates the lives of lost loved ones in a traditional, fulsome way.

Over the course of the pandemic, we needed a safe way to maintain business continuity. We also needed a way to connect with loved ones that were not part of our immediate bubble. As a result we witnessed a sharp rise in the use of video conferencing tools to facilitate meetings for the millions of office workers who started to work from home. Video conferencing tools also a way to connect for birthdays, baby showers and, sadly, funerals.

Monday, Mar. 22, 2021

Dreamstime.com
People have been interacting via video-conferencing platforms since the COVID-19 pandemic began over a year ago, but nothing will replace in-person and face-to-face meetings.

Building safe communities for seniors

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Preview

Building safe communities for seniors

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Friday, Feb. 26, 2021

Building safe and welcoming communities for seniors to age-in-place is a sign of a healthy community.

Assuming there is an availability of affordable housing options and community resources, the vast majority of Canadians would prefer to remain in their homes or condominiums and find sources for the necessary services required to maintain the standard of living to which they are accustomed.

The most common responses in surveys of seniors and their desire to age-in-place indicate that they feel safer in their home because of familiarity and that they would like to continue to have access to nearby services. 

Residents in the St. Norbert–Seine River ward may have noticed an increased number of multi-family dwellings that have been developed over the years along major transportation corridors such as St. Mary’s Road, St. Anne’s Road, Pembina Highway and Dakota Street.

Friday, Feb. 26, 2021

Building safe and welcoming communities for seniors to age-in-place is a sign of a healthy community.

Assuming there is an availability of affordable housing options and community resources, the vast majority of Canadians would prefer to remain in their homes or condominiums and find sources for the necessary services required to maintain the standard of living to which they are accustomed.

The most common responses in surveys of seniors and their desire to age-in-place indicate that they feel safer in their home because of familiarity and that they would like to continue to have access to nearby services. 

Residents in the St. Norbert–Seine River ward may have noticed an increased number of multi-family dwellings that have been developed over the years along major transportation corridors such as St. Mary’s Road, St. Anne’s Road, Pembina Highway and Dakota Street.

Building safe communities for seniors

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Preview

Building safe communities for seniors

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021

Building safe and welcoming communities for seniors to age-in-place is a sign of a healthy community.

Assuming  there is an availability of affordable housing options and community resources, the vast majority of Canadians would prefer to remain in their homes or condominiums and source the necessary services required to maintain the standard of living to which they are accustomed.

The most common responses in surveys of seniors and their desire to age-in-place indicate that they feel safer in their home because of familiarity and that they would like to continue to access nearby services.  

Residents in the St. Norbert – Seine River Ward may  have notices an increased number of multi-family dwellings that have been developed over the years along major transportation corridors such as St. Mary’s Road, St. Anne’s Road, Pembina Highway and Dakota Street.  Many of these accommodations are geared to a 55-plus lifestyle and are close to many amenities such as passive parks, grocery stores and shops and professional services. Developing multi-family dwellings along high-frequency transit networks also means there will be less reliance on personal vehicles for transport around the city.

Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021

Building safe and welcoming communities for seniors to age-in-place is a sign of a healthy community.

Assuming  there is an availability of affordable housing options and community resources, the vast majority of Canadians would prefer to remain in their homes or condominiums and source the necessary services required to maintain the standard of living to which they are accustomed.

The most common responses in surveys of seniors and their desire to age-in-place indicate that they feel safer in their home because of familiarity and that they would like to continue to access nearby services.  

Residents in the St. Norbert – Seine River Ward may  have notices an increased number of multi-family dwellings that have been developed over the years along major transportation corridors such as St. Mary’s Road, St. Anne’s Road, Pembina Highway and Dakota Street.  Many of these accommodations are geared to a 55-plus lifestyle and are close to many amenities such as passive parks, grocery stores and shops and professional services. Developing multi-family dwellings along high-frequency transit networks also means there will be less reliance on personal vehicles for transport around the city.

Transportation and growth in Winnipeg

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Preview

Transportation and growth in Winnipeg

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021

Winnipeg’s population has grown over the last 10 to 15 years, based largely on immigration to our province.  

While the success of the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program has helped to fill labour skill shortages and diversify our communities, with it comes greater opportunities and challenges for transportation. With projected growth over the next two decades, we must seek innovative and proactive transportation solutions to meet the needs of Winnipeg’s current and future economic and population growth.

Transportation has been one of the focal issues of our city’s vision for the future. The Transportation Master Plan 2050 will study our future transportation needs by researching and consulting a wide swath of stakeholders. There are a variety of considerations to address including safety, accessibility, efficiency and the environment to name a few.

Winnipeggers’ primary mode of travel is by private motor vehicle, a trend that began as growth and design of our city spread our communities into suburbia. As the city grows, corresponding commute times are likely to increase, while our aging road infrastructure will deteriorate at a faster pace.  It is critical that Winnipeg finds a different means of accommodating more people and more travel demand before growth outpaces resources and the ability to respond to the needs of our residents.  

Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021

Winnipeg’s population has grown over the last 10 to 15 years, based largely on immigration to our province.  

While the success of the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program has helped to fill labour skill shortages and diversify our communities, with it comes greater opportunities and challenges for transportation. With projected growth over the next two decades, we must seek innovative and proactive transportation solutions to meet the needs of Winnipeg’s current and future economic and population growth.

Transportation has been one of the focal issues of our city’s vision for the future. The Transportation Master Plan 2050 will study our future transportation needs by researching and consulting a wide swath of stakeholders. There are a variety of considerations to address including safety, accessibility, efficiency and the environment to name a few.

Winnipeggers’ primary mode of travel is by private motor vehicle, a trend that began as growth and design of our city spread our communities into suburbia. As the city grows, corresponding commute times are likely to increase, while our aging road infrastructure will deteriorate at a faster pace.  It is critical that Winnipeg finds a different means of accommodating more people and more travel demand before growth outpaces resources and the ability to respond to the needs of our residents.  

The importance of public consultation

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Preview

The importance of public consultation

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Monday, Dec. 28, 2020

The creation of public policy starts with addressing a specific issue that requires direction or a principle to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes.

A policy is a statement of intent, and is implemented as a procedure or protocol. Policies are generally adopted by a governance body within an organization such as City Council.

The development of public policy begins with involving the public and gauging their desired outcome to creation or adjustments to public policy. Similarly, private industry uses focus groups to solicit opinions and reactions to a variety of products they plan to bring to market.

While the development of public policy is and should be based largely on information that is evidence-based and researched, it should also be supported by efforts to strengthen the policy capacity through robust discussion and consultation.

Monday, Dec. 28, 2020

The creation of public policy starts with addressing a specific issue that requires direction or a principle to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes.

A policy is a statement of intent, and is implemented as a procedure or protocol. Policies are generally adopted by a governance body within an organization such as City Council.

The development of public policy begins with involving the public and gauging their desired outcome to creation or adjustments to public policy. Similarly, private industry uses focus groups to solicit opinions and reactions to a variety of products they plan to bring to market.

While the development of public policy is and should be based largely on information that is evidence-based and researched, it should also be supported by efforts to strengthen the policy capacity through robust discussion and consultation.

Public consultation important

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Preview

Public consultation important

Markus Chambers 2 minute read Monday, Dec. 28, 2020

The creation of public policy starts with addressing a specific issue that requires direction or a principle to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes.

A policy is a statement of intent, and is implemented as a procedure or protocol. Policies are generally adopted by a governance body within an organization such as City Council.

The development of public policy begins with involving the public and gauging their desired outcome to creation or adjustments to public policy. Similarly, private industry uses focus groups to solicit opinions and reactions to a variety of products they plan to bring to market.

While the development of public policy is and should be based largely on information that is evidence-based and researched, it should also be supported by efforts to strengthen the policy capacity through robust discussion and consultation.

Monday, Dec. 28, 2020

The creation of public policy starts with addressing a specific issue that requires direction or a principle to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes.

A policy is a statement of intent, and is implemented as a procedure or protocol. Policies are generally adopted by a governance body within an organization such as City Council.

The development of public policy begins with involving the public and gauging their desired outcome to creation or adjustments to public policy. Similarly, private industry uses focus groups to solicit opinions and reactions to a variety of products they plan to bring to market.

While the development of public policy is and should be based largely on information that is evidence-based and researched, it should also be supported by efforts to strengthen the policy capacity through robust discussion and consultation.

2020 in review: it’s been exhausting

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Preview

2020 in review: it’s been exhausting

Markus Chambers 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 4, 2020

Actually, to say that 2020 has been exhausting  is likely the understatement of the year. Winnipeg and the world have been in the grips of a global pandemic which has defined the news narrative of the past 12 months. 

March was certainly a time for caution as the uncertainty we experienced when our first cases of the virus were diagnosed resulted in the province shutting down all non-essential contact, including businesses, services, schools, and social activity. When Manitoba experienced low transmission of the virus we had reason for cautious optimism.

Through the spring and summer months and as restrictions eased, Winnipeggers began to explore their city and province, discovering hidden gems that have been taken for granted over the years. Not a week passed where a new vista was not reported by media and many flocked to enjoy.

This past fall brought concerns and worry to many Winnipeggers as children returned to school and medical experts warned about the reality of a second wave of infections. While numbers through September were still low, it did not take long before that wave hit, in unprecedented numbers.

Friday, Dec. 4, 2020

Actually, to say that 2020 has been exhausting  is likely the understatement of the year. Winnipeg and the world have been in the grips of a global pandemic which has defined the news narrative of the past 12 months. 

March was certainly a time for caution as the uncertainty we experienced when our first cases of the virus were diagnosed resulted in the province shutting down all non-essential contact, including businesses, services, schools, and social activity. When Manitoba experienced low transmission of the virus we had reason for cautious optimism.

Through the spring and summer months and as restrictions eased, Winnipeggers began to explore their city and province, discovering hidden gems that have been taken for granted over the years. Not a week passed where a new vista was not reported by media and many flocked to enjoy.

This past fall brought concerns and worry to many Winnipeggers as children returned to school and medical experts warned about the reality of a second wave of infections. While numbers through September were still low, it did not take long before that wave hit, in unprecedented numbers.

2020 in review — it’s been exhausting

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Preview

2020 in review — it’s been exhausting

Markus Chambers — St. Norbert-Seine River City Councillor Ward Report 3 minute read Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020

Actually, to say that 2020 has been exhausting is likely the understatement of the year. Winnipeg and the world have been in the grips of a global pandemic which has defined the news narrative of the past 12 months.  

March was certainly a time for caution as the uncertainty we experienced when our first cases of the virus were diagnosed resulted in the province shutting down all non-essential contact, including businesses, services, schools, and social activity. When Manitoba experienced low transmission of the virus we had reason for cautious optimism.

Through the spring and summer months and as restrictions eased, Winnipeggers began to explore their city and province, discovering hidden gems that have been taken for granted over the years. Not a week passed where a new vista was not reported by media and many flocked to enjoy.

This past fall brought concerns and worry to many Winnipeggers as children returned to school and medical experts warned about the reality of a second wave of infections. While numbers through September were still low, it did not take long before that wave hit, in unprecedented numbers.

Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020

Actually, to say that 2020 has been exhausting is likely the understatement of the year. Winnipeg and the world have been in the grips of a global pandemic which has defined the news narrative of the past 12 months.  

March was certainly a time for caution as the uncertainty we experienced when our first cases of the virus were diagnosed resulted in the province shutting down all non-essential contact, including businesses, services, schools, and social activity. When Manitoba experienced low transmission of the virus we had reason for cautious optimism.

Through the spring and summer months and as restrictions eased, Winnipeggers began to explore their city and province, discovering hidden gems that have been taken for granted over the years. Not a week passed where a new vista was not reported by media and many flocked to enjoy.

This past fall brought concerns and worry to many Winnipeggers as children returned to school and medical experts warned about the reality of a second wave of infections. While numbers through September were still low, it did not take long before that wave hit, in unprecedented numbers.