Marty Morantz

Marty Morantz

Charleswood - St. James - Assiniboia - Headingley constituency report

Marty Morantz is the Conservative MP for Charleswood – St. James – Assiniboia – Headingley.

Recent articles of Marty Morantz

Holding the federal government to account

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Preview

Holding the federal government to account

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2022

I was recently honoured to be named associate shadow minister for finance and middle-class prosperity under new Conservative Party of Canada leader Pierre Poilievre.

As Pierre has rightly pointed out, the cost of government has become too expensive for Canadians under the Trudeau Liberals. It’s critical that this government be held to account for its out-of-control spending, and this is exactly what I plan to do in this new role.

It’s time that we begin the journey to replace this tired government that costs you more and delivers you less with a new government that puts you first.

Today, people feel like they’ve lost control of their pocketbooks and their lives. That everything is broken.

Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2022

File photo

Charleswood-St.James-Assiniboia-Headingley MP Marty Morantz was recently named associate shadow minister of finance and middle-class prosperity by new Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre.

Summer jobs program has young people working

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Preview

Summer jobs program has young people working

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022

Young Canadians have been deeply affected by the loss of employment opportunities as we recover from the pandemic. The energy young people bring to Canada’s economy is often under-recognized as a powerful force in our financial recovery. They deserve meaningful, high-quality jobs that offer valuable experience in the workforce. After all, young Canadians are the key to a positive future.

From the cancellation of their high school graduations to prolonged virtual education, young constituents of Charleswood-St. James-Assiniboia-Headingley have overcome countless challenges over the past two years. I know it has not been easy, and I know many of them are eager to move forward with their lives.

With the help of the Canada Summer Jobs program, over 130 young people in our community will be able to do just that. They will receive valuable work experience this summer that will give them the opportunity to develop the foundational skills they will need to succeed in their chosen careers. I cannot think of a better, more worthwhile investment in our community’s future.

One of my favourite things to do as a member of Parliament is visiting young students who have found employment through the Canada Summer Jobs program. I will be continuing to make these visits throughout the summer so keep an eye out for me at local businesses in our community.

Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022

Young Canadians have been deeply affected by the loss of employment opportunities as we recover from the pandemic. The energy young people bring to Canada’s economy is often under-recognized as a powerful force in our financial recovery. They deserve meaningful, high-quality jobs that offer valuable experience in the workforce. After all, young Canadians are the key to a positive future.

From the cancellation of their high school graduations to prolonged virtual education, young constituents of Charleswood-St. James-Assiniboia-Headingley have overcome countless challenges over the past two years. I know it has not been easy, and I know many of them are eager to move forward with their lives.

With the help of the Canada Summer Jobs program, over 130 young people in our community will be able to do just that. They will receive valuable work experience this summer that will give them the opportunity to develop the foundational skills they will need to succeed in their chosen careers. I cannot think of a better, more worthwhile investment in our community’s future.

One of my favourite things to do as a member of Parliament is visiting young students who have found employment through the Canada Summer Jobs program. I will be continuing to make these visits throughout the summer so keep an eye out for me at local businesses in our community.

Free income tax clinic a huge success

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Preview

Free income tax clinic a huge success

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Friday, Jun. 17, 2022

Filing your taxes is no easy task.

Oftentimes, it is confusing and downright difficult.

Many do not have access to or can’t afford the resources they need to file their taxes — such as a computer, a printer, or money to pay expensive accountants or income tax offices.

I recognize that filing your taxes can be a frustrating process and that for many, there is nowhere to go.

Friday, Jun. 17, 2022

Filing your taxes is no easy task.

Oftentimes, it is confusing and downright difficult.

Many do not have access to or can’t afford the resources they need to file their taxes — such as a computer, a printer, or money to pay expensive accountants or income tax offices.

I recognize that filing your taxes can be a frustrating process and that for many, there is nowhere to go.

Parliament unified in support of Ukraine

Marty Morantz 3 minute read Preview

Parliament unified in support of Ukraine

Marty Morantz 3 minute read Wednesday, Apr. 27, 2022

Most Canadians take for granted that politicians always seem to be at each other’s throats.

I often get asked why is your party so critical of the government? Why are you always opposed to anything the government does?

My response is usually something like… “Well, it is the job of the official opposition to oppose the government and to hold the government to account. It is an extremely important role in a parliamentary democracy.”

We see time and time again that countries without a strong political opposition often take a dark path.

Wednesday, Apr. 27, 2022

Most Canadians take for granted that politicians always seem to be at each other’s throats.

I often get asked why is your party so critical of the government? Why are you always opposed to anything the government does?

My response is usually something like… “Well, it is the job of the official opposition to oppose the government and to hold the government to account. It is an extremely important role in a parliamentary democracy.”

We see time and time again that countries without a strong political opposition often take a dark path.

When charities are hurting, people are hurting

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Preview

When charities are hurting, people are hurting

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Wednesday, Mar. 9, 2022

As citizens across the country are looking forward to easing their way out of the COVID-19 pandemic, lawmakers can and must play a crucial role in supporting the multiple organizations that have stepped up to help Canadians in their time of need.

The loss of regular donations for charities has taken a devastating toll on our communities, leaving many of these organizations in a state of uncertainty as they work day and night to get back on track with their regular operations that help those who need it the most.

The bottom line is simple — when charities are hurting, people are hurting.

Fortunately, the current government has an opportunity to deliver immediate, compassionate, and common-sense relief to help Canadians through the present economic emergency without any significant additional strain to the current fiscal framework that is already running massive and unnecessary historic deficits. The solution to this problem is very simple, achievable, and functions at an affordable cost that will spur significant growth within Canada’s charitable sectors.

Wednesday, Mar. 9, 2022

As citizens across the country are looking forward to easing their way out of the COVID-19 pandemic, lawmakers can and must play a crucial role in supporting the multiple organizations that have stepped up to help Canadians in their time of need.

The loss of regular donations for charities has taken a devastating toll on our communities, leaving many of these organizations in a state of uncertainty as they work day and night to get back on track with their regular operations that help those who need it the most.

The bottom line is simple — when charities are hurting, people are hurting.

Fortunately, the current government has an opportunity to deliver immediate, compassionate, and common-sense relief to help Canadians through the present economic emergency without any significant additional strain to the current fiscal framework that is already running massive and unnecessary historic deficits. The solution to this problem is very simple, achievable, and functions at an affordable cost that will spur significant growth within Canada’s charitable sectors.

Calling for more tools to combat COVID-19

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Preview

Calling for more tools to combat COVID-19

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Friday, Jan. 14, 2022

The resiliency shown by the residents of Charleswood-St. James-Assiniboia-Headingley in the continuing wave of the Omicron variant  of the SARS-CoV-2 virus has been nothing short of inspiring.

Individuals and families making sacrifices in the face of this new challenge, staying home and keeping their distance, is truly evidence of the caring Canadian spirit.

To help protect their fellow citizens, families, and our health care system, residents, including myself, have rolled up our sleeves to receive the COVID-19 vaccine and booster.  

During the latest spike in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, I have, alongside my fellow Conservative colleagues in Ottawa, been advocating for solutions that would allow Canadians to manage the latest wave of this pandemic.  

Friday, Jan. 14, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Most Canadians have been vaccinated, but MP Marty Morantz writes that he and his parliamentary colleagues are pressuring the federal government to employ more tools in the fight against the ongoing pandemic.

Canada’s best days are ahead of us

Marty Morantz 3 minute read Preview

Canada’s best days are ahead of us

Marty Morantz 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

It is an incredible honour to serve the people of Charleswood-St. James-Assiniboia-Headingley as we step into 2022.

I love our community. No matter the challenge, people here repeatedly come together with typical Canadian humility and resilience. The COVID-19 pandemic has been a challenge for all Canadians over the past two years and I owe a huge thanks to all my constituents for doing their part in helping the people within our communities get through this pandemic together. We are united in getting back to a healthy and prosperous life as Canada finally returns to a state of normality.  

Each day, I am working hard to advocate for the people Charleswood-St. James-Assiniboia-Headingley. The Conservative Party of Canada is the only party that is standing up for families facing rising living costs, for businesses unsure what the next few months look like, and for Canadians who are worried about their future and the future of their children.

It is my honour and duty to serve as your voice in Ottawa so that everyday issues are heard loud and clear, bringing real results for the people that need it most within our beautiful riding, within the province of Manitoba, and of course, all of Canada.  

Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Mathieu Girard, House of Commons
Charleswood-St. James-Assiniboia-Headingley MP Marty Morantz is pictured at the House of Commons swearing-in ceremony last month.

Back to work serving our community

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Preview

Back to work serving our community

Marty Morantz 2 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021

I want to give a huge thank you to all the voters of Charleswood-St. James-Assiniboia-Headingley for putting their faith in me to continue serving our community.

For more than two years I’ve been listening to the feedback I’ve received from residents of our community and have been using my office to ensure that your feedback is heard by the government.

One issue I have heard consistently over the last few months is how inflation is negatively affecting our community and family’s abilities to make ends meet.

Inflation makes it hard for young families and those on fixed incomes such as seniors to make ends meet.

Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021

Mathieu Girard, House of Commons
MP Marty Morantz is thankful that the voters of Charleswood-St.James-Assiniboia-Headingley saw fit to re-elect him last month.

No more delays – help should be three digits away

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Preview

No more delays – help should be three digits away

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Friday, Jun. 25, 2021

It’s been over 200 days since we unanimously passed a motion in the House of Commons to create a three-digit 9-8-8 national suicide hotline. Every 24 hours, 11 Canadians die by suicide. A further 275 attempt it. Using those numbers, more than 2,000 Canadians have died by suicide since this motion was passed. A further 50,000 have attempted suicide.Each number represents a person who couldn’t get the assistance they needed, and their family and loved ones left struggling on how to move forward.Suicide is the second-leading cause of death of young children in Canada. Research conducted by the Canadian Mental Health Association has shown that more Canadians, especially the most vulnerable, are thinking about suicide. Sadly, rather than taking immediate action to implement a three-digit suicide prevention hotline, the federal government passed the buck to the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), which is just beginning consultations six months later. We can’t allow initiatives focused on suicide prevention to be slowed because of these unnecessary delays. The longer the government waits to act, the more lives that will be lost. It’s clear that we cannot wait for the government to table legislation to make the necessary addition of this hotline to the Telecommunications Act, and that’s why my colleague Todd Doherty tabled Bill C-294. This bill will require the CRTC to dedicate a three-digit suicide-prevention service within one year. Canada’s National Suicide Prevention Hotline is currently a standard 10-digit number. When someone is in crisis and at the point where they want to ask for help, a simple three-digit and easy to remember number could make the difference between a life saved and a life lost.This hotline has experienced a call increase of 200 per cent during the pandemic, leading to increased wait times. Imagine calling 9-1-1 during an emergency and being asked to hold the line, or worse, getting an automated message. This is unacceptable.The United States has acted on this issue by passing bipartisan legislation to address it. Starting in 2022, Americans will have access to a simple, easy to remember three-digit national suicide prevention hotline. Here at home, there is no reason why we cannot do the same.When minutes count, help should only be three digits away, and I will continue working with my colleagues to make this happen. In the meantime, should you or someone you know be struggling with thoughts of suicide, please call 1-833-456-4566.

It’s been over 200 days since we unanimously passed a motion in the House of Commons to create a three-digit 9-8-8 national suicide hotline. 

Every 24 hours, 11 Canadians die by suicide. A further 275 attempt it. Using those numbers, more than 2,000 Canadians have died by suicide since this motion was passed. A further 50,000 have attempted suicide.

Each number represents a person who couldn’t get the assistance they needed, and their family and loved ones left struggling on how to move forward.

Friday, Jun. 25, 2021

17 Wing is a longstanding part of St. James

Marty Morantz 4 minute read Preview

17 Wing is a longstanding part of St. James

Marty Morantz 4 minute read Friday, May. 28, 2021

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the RM of St. James, currently known as the St. James Ward of the City of Winnipeg. Within those 100 years, St. James has grown from a small rural community to the beautiful neighbourhood we know today. There are many places and organizations that have helped shape St. James into the community it is today and support those to put down roots and make fond memories to share with Canadians across the country.One of these places is 17 Wing. Originally called RCAF Station Winnipeg, the base officially opened in April 1925 and was one of the first Air Force bases in Canada. In its long history, 17 Wing has not only played a role in the history of our community but has also played a role in shaping the history of our country.During the Second World War, the base played a major part in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. Today, 17 Wing supports NORAD fighter operations as a deployed operations base for the CF-18 Hornets.With these major roles, there have been many within the RCAF and other branches of the Canadian Armed Forces who have called St. James home. One of these people, Erin O’Toole, is now the leader of the Conservative Party of Canada.Moving to Winnipeg, he lived right on the base, near the Military Family Resource Centre. It was at 17 Wing that Erin received his wings and learned to golf at the little course around the bottom of the runway that is now the CFB Winnipeg Golf Club.In addition to those calling St. James home during their time at 17 Wing, many dignitaries have come to visit the community by flying into the base. These include Her Majesty the Queen and the late Duke of Edinburgh, who visited in 2002, on what would be their last royal visit to the city.The St. James community has grown so much since being officially established in 1921. I look forward to working with members of our community to celebrate its history and work towards ensuring the future of St. James is bright and prosperous for those who call it home.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the RM of St. James, currently known as the St. James Ward of the City of Winnipeg. Within those 100 years, St. James has grown from a small rural community to the beautiful neighbourhood we know today. There are many places and organizations that have helped shape St. James into the community it is today and support those to put down roots and make fond memories to share with Canadians across the country.

One of these places is 17 Wing. Originally called RCAF Station Winnipeg, the base officially opened in April 1925 and was one of the first Air Force bases in Canada. In its long history, 17 Wing has not only played a role in the history of our community but has also played a role in shaping the history of our country.

During the Second World War, the base played a major part in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. Today, 17 Wing supports NORAD fighter operations as a deployed operations base for the CF-18 Hornets.

Friday, May. 28, 2021

Supplied photo
Charleswood-St. James-Assiniboia-Headingley MP Marty Morantz (in the cockpit of the plane) visits 17 Wing.

Federal budget rolls the dice with your future

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Preview

Federal budget rolls the dice with your future

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Friday, Apr. 30, 2021

During challenging times, such as the ones we are experiencing today, it may be necessary to go into deficit to stimulate the economy to help people get back up on their feet, and build infrastructure, including rebuilding our manufacturing capabilities.We have been waiting for a federal budget to do exactly that, however. what the federal government  has tabled will only worsen Canada’s debt problem and make it more difficult for us to recover from this pandemic in the long-term.Because of this budget alone, every Canadian each now owes over $33,000 in debt alongside the interest payments to service this debt. This is on top of already existing levels of high consumer and provincial debt. This budget is building on federal government’s previous policies of higher debt, higher taxes, and lower economic output. Creditors who loan us money have already shown hesitancy about our increasing debt. Last year, Fitch downgraded our national credit rating, with S & P also talking about downgrading our rating should the deterioration in the government’s fiscal position become more severe and prolonged than we currently expect. There are real consequences to being downgraded, such as an increase in interest rates, resulting in how much we need to pay to tackle our debt.  We saw this during the 1990s. The Liberal government of Jean Chrétien was forced to slash over 10 per cent in total spending, reducing health transfers to provinces, cutting post-secondary education and social services, and restraining Employment Insurance. This was in addition to slashed funding for our military, civil service, and customs and immigration. Major government cuts became necessary to pay off the immense debt. Simply put, promised government services cannot last if we do not have an ability to pay for them. The Prime Minister with this budget is rolling the dice and gambling with our future. Instead of gambling with financial policy, we need a solid and clear plan forward that will help Canadians who are struggling be able to return to their jobs or have other job opportunities available to them, unlike what this budget has delivered. The Conservative recovery plan is a real alternative that is focused on creating financial security and certainty. It’s a plan that is focused on securing jobs and the economy for Canadians, so that no one is left behind. This plan will ensure that manufacturing at home is bolstered, wages for workers will go up, and where the dream of affording a better life for their children can be realized by all Canadians. 

During challenging times, such as the ones we are experiencing today, it may be necessary to go into deficit to stimulate the economy to help people get back up on their feet, and build infrastructure, including rebuilding our manufacturing capabilities.

We have been waiting for a federal budget to do exactly that, however. what the federal government  has tabled will only worsen Canada’s debt problem and make it more difficult for us to recover from this pandemic in the long-term.

Because of this budget alone, every Canadian each now owes over $33,000 in debt alongside the interest payments to service this debt. This is on top of already existing levels of high consumer and provincial debt. This budget is building on federal government’s previous policies of higher debt, higher taxes, and lower economic output. 

Friday, Apr. 30, 2021

Bernard Thibodeau, HOC-CDC
Marty Morantz speaks in the House of Commons in June 2020.

Proud to support Rotary Club proposal

Marty Morantz 3 minute read Preview

Proud to support Rotary Club proposal

Marty Morantz 3 minute read Friday, Apr. 9, 2021

For decades, the Assiniboine Forest has helped members of our community connect with nature without needing to drive outside the city. In fact, at 700 acres, it’s the largest urban natural forest in Canada.

The Assiniboine Forest is a jewel of our community, drawing people from around the province. More people use the forest now more than ever due to the pandemic for a safe way to remain active, while enjoying the natural beauty of the forest. There are a series of six paved and unpaved trails established within its southern portion for a total of 18 kilometres of maintained trails. Some of the trails are paved with crushed limestone, others with asphalt or wood chips, and are used heavily year-round by pedestrians and cyclists. The trails make the forest easy to navigate, fascinating to study and a delightful place to get some exercise or connect with nature.

Thirty years ago, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club reached an initial accord with the City of Winnipeg, whereby it would assist the City of Winnipeg naturalists’ office with maintenance of the forest. Since reaching this accord, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club has been responsible for the creation and management of the existing trail network, along with upgrades to the forest. It has done a fantastic job, but it now needs some support to continue to work they are doing.

Recently, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club applied to the Canada Healthy Communities Initiative (CHCI) for funding for improvements including improved trail access for those with disabilities, safe dual active transportation trails, improved signage, and additional parking. These initiatives are based upon a study done by the Rotary Club which included community surveys, consultations with staff and students of nearby universities and the City of Winnipeg naturalists’ office.

Friday, Apr. 9, 2021

For decades, the Assiniboine Forest has helped members of our community connect with nature without needing to drive outside the city. In fact, at 700 acres, it’s the largest urban natural forest in Canada.

The Assiniboine Forest is a jewel of our community, drawing people from around the province. More people use the forest now more than ever due to the pandemic for a safe way to remain active, while enjoying the natural beauty of the forest. There are a series of six paved and unpaved trails established within its southern portion for a total of 18 kilometres of maintained trails. Some of the trails are paved with crushed limestone, others with asphalt or wood chips, and are used heavily year-round by pedestrians and cyclists. The trails make the forest easy to navigate, fascinating to study and a delightful place to get some exercise or connect with nature.

Thirty years ago, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club reached an initial accord with the City of Winnipeg, whereby it would assist the City of Winnipeg naturalists’ office with maintenance of the forest. Since reaching this accord, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club has been responsible for the creation and management of the existing trail network, along with upgrades to the forest. It has done a fantastic job, but it now needs some support to continue to work they are doing.

Recently, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club applied to the Canada Healthy Communities Initiative (CHCI) for funding for improvements including improved trail access for those with disabilities, safe dual active transportation trails, improved signage, and additional parking. These initiatives are based upon a study done by the Rotary Club which included community surveys, consultations with staff and students of nearby universities and the City of Winnipeg naturalists’ office.

Assiniboine Forest proposal worthy of support

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Preview

Assiniboine Forest proposal worthy of support

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Thursday, Apr. 1, 2021

For decades, the Assiniboine Forest has helped members of our community connect with nature without needing to drive outside the city. In fact, at 700 acres, it’s the largest urban natural forest in Canada.The Assiniboine Forest is a jewel of our community, drawing people from around the province. More people use the forest now more than ever due to the pandemic for a safe way to remain active, while enjoying the natural beauty of the forest. There are a series of six paved and unpaved trails established within its southern portion for a total of 18 kilometres of maintained trails. Some of the trails are paved with crushed limestone, others with asphalt or wood chips, and are used heavily year-round by pedestrians and cyclists. The trails make the forest easy to navigate, fascinating to study and a delightful place to get some exercise or connect with nature.Thirty years ago, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club reached an initial accord with the City of Winnipeg, whereby it would assist the City of Winnipeg naturalists’ office with maintenance of the forest. Since reaching this accord, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club has been responsible for the creation and management of the existing trail network, along with upgrades to the forest. It has done a fantastic job, but it now needs some support to continue the work they are doing.Recently, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club applied to the Canada Healthy Communities Initiative (CHCI) for funding for improvements including improved trail access for those with disabilities, safe dual active transportation trails, improved signage, and additional parking. These initiatives are based upon a study done by the Rotary Club which included community surveys, consultations with staff and students of nearby universities and the City of Winnipeg naturalists’ office.I have written to the federal Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, Catherine McKenna, to voice my strong support for the Rotary Club’s funding application. These proposed improvements are much needed to ensure the Assiniboine Forest is maintained for generations to come and continue serving our community as one of the largest urban nature parks of its kind in Canada.The Assiniboine Forest is an important part of our community, and I’ll continue doing what I can to support the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club’s excellent work not only maintaining the forest, but by making it more accessible so that more people from here and abroad can enjoy all it has to offer.

For decades, the Assiniboine Forest has helped members of our community connect with nature without needing to drive outside the city. In fact, at 700 acres, it’s the largest urban natural forest in Canada.

The Assiniboine Forest is a jewel of our community, drawing people from around the province. More people use the forest now more than ever due to the pandemic for a safe way to remain active, while enjoying the natural beauty of the forest. There are a series of six paved and unpaved trails established within its southern portion for a total of 18 kilometres of maintained trails. Some of the trails are paved with crushed limestone, others with asphalt or wood chips, and are used heavily year-round by pedestrians and cyclists. The trails make the forest easy to navigate, fascinating to study and a delightful place to get some exercise or connect with nature.

Thirty years ago, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club reached an initial accord with the City of Winnipeg, whereby it would assist the City of Winnipeg naturalists’ office with maintenance of the forest. Since reaching this accord, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club has been responsible for the creation and management of the existing trail network, along with upgrades to the forest. It has done a fantastic job, but it now needs some support to continue the work they are doing.

Thursday, Apr. 1, 2021

For decades, the Assiniboine Forest has helped members of our community connect with nature without needing to drive outside the city. In fact, at 700 acres, it’s the largest urban natural forest in Canada.The Assiniboine Forest is a jewel of our community, drawing people from around the province. More people use the forest now more than ever due to the pandemic for a safe way to remain active, while enjoying the natural beauty of the forest. There are a series of six paved and unpaved trails established within its southern portion for a total of 18 kilometres of maintained trails. Some of the trails are paved with crushed limestone, others with asphalt or wood chips, and are used heavily year-round by pedestrians and cyclists. The trails make the forest easy to navigate, fascinating to study and a delightful place to get some exercise or connect with nature.Thirty years ago, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club reached an initial accord with the City of Winnipeg, whereby it would assist the City of Winnipeg naturalists’ office with maintenance of the forest. Since reaching this accord, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club has been responsible for the creation and management of the existing trail network, along with upgrades to the forest. It has done a fantastic job, but it now needs some support to continue the work they are doing.Recently, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club applied to the Canada Healthy Communities Initiative (CHCI) for funding for improvements including improved trail access for those with disabilities, safe dual active transportation trails, improved signage, and additional parking. These initiatives are based upon a study done by the Rotary Club which included community surveys, consultations with staff and students of nearby universities and the City of Winnipeg naturalists’ office.I have written to the federal Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, Catherine McKenna, to voice my strong support for the Rotary Club’s funding application. These proposed improvements are much needed to ensure the Assiniboine Forest is maintained for generations to come and continue serving our community as one of the largest urban nature parks of its kind in Canada.The Assiniboine Forest is an important part of our community, and I’ll continue doing what I can to support the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club’s excellent work not only maintaining the forest, but by making it more accessible so that more people from here and abroad can enjoy all it has to offer.

For decades, the Assiniboine Forest has helped members of our community connect with nature without needing to drive outside the city. In fact, at 700 acres, it’s the largest urban natural forest in Canada.

The Assiniboine Forest is a jewel of our community, drawing people from around the province. More people use the forest now more than ever due to the pandemic for a safe way to remain active, while enjoying the natural beauty of the forest. There are a series of six paved and unpaved trails established within its southern portion for a total of 18 kilometres of maintained trails. Some of the trails are paved with crushed limestone, others with asphalt or wood chips, and are used heavily year-round by pedestrians and cyclists. The trails make the forest easy to navigate, fascinating to study and a delightful place to get some exercise or connect with nature.

Thirty years ago, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club reached an initial accord with the City of Winnipeg, whereby it would assist the City of Winnipeg naturalists’ office with maintenance of the forest. Since reaching this accord, the Winnipeg-Charleswood Rotary Club has been responsible for the creation and management of the existing trail network, along with upgrades to the forest. It has done a fantastic job, but it now needs some support to continue the work they are doing.

An active February in Parliament

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Preview

An active February in Parliament

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Friday, Mar. 5, 2021

 

February was a busy month in the House of Commons with a substantial number of bills and motions debated and passed, including many from our Conservative team. Bill C-204, which would ban the export of non-recyclable plastic waste to foreign countries, was passed at second reading. Canada must show leadership - we have the means to properly dispose of plastic waste here in Canada, and we should not be exporting it for other countries to deal with. Despite all but one of the Liberal MPs voting against this bill, I was happy to see it passed with support of MPs from other opposition parties. Bill C-220, which would extend the length of compassionate care leave up to three weeks beyond the death of a loved one, passed second reading in February. Currently, full-time employees can take up to 28 weeks off work through the compassionate care leave benefit to care for a loved one who has a serious medical condition with a significant risk of death. However, the current leave ends within days of a loved one’s death. This bill will allow more time for caregivers to grieve and take care of practical necessities before returning to work.We also used an Opposition day opportunity to bring forward a motion in the House calling on Parliament to recognize the genocide being carried out by the People’s Republic of China against Uighurs and other Turkic Muslims. While this motion passed unanimously, I was saddened to see the Prime Minister and all but one member of cabinet failed to even show up for the vote.Famed Holocaust survivor and scholar Elie Wiesel said: “We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.” The government’s silence on this issue spoke volumes. Bill C-238, which would impose tougher sentences for criminals smuggling illegal firearms, came to a vote and sadly was defeated with all but two Liberal MPs voting against it. To truly tackle gun violence the government needs to tackle where criminals are getting their firearms, and this bill would have done just that. Statistics show many gun crimes in Canada are committed by firearms illegally smuggled into Canada. Unfortunately, by not supporting this important bill, the government leaves Canadians vulnerable to gun violence with illegally imported firearms.There is still much work to do, but I remain committed to working with my colleagues from all parties to ensure all legislation passed in the House of Commons will benefit our community, leaving a better Canada for our future generations.Should you have any questions about legislation before the House of Commons, or wish to propose ideas, please don’t hesitate to reach out by emailing me at marty.morantz@parl.gc.ca 

February was a busy month in the House of Commons with a substantial number of bills and motions debated and passed, including many from our Conservative team. 

Bill C-204, which would ban the export of non-recyclable plastic waste to foreign countries, was passed at second reading. Canada must show leadership - we have the means to properly dispose of plastic waste here in Canada, and we should not be exporting it for other countries to deal with. 

Friday, Mar. 5, 2021

Christian Diotte / House of Comm
Charleswood-St. James-Assiniboia-Headingley MP Marty Morantz speaks in the House of Commons.

MP Morantz offering tax clinic and more

Marty Morantz 4 minute read Preview

MP Morantz offering tax clinic and more

Marty Morantz 4 minute read Friday, Feb. 5, 2021

In addition to bringing our community’s concerns forward, my office offers a number of services. These include providing support navigating federal departments and bringing attention to your applications and submissions for government programs and supports. Last year, before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, my office was happy to offer to a free tax clinic to those in our community with low incomes.Last year we were able to help 35 people access $42,016.90 in tax refunds and $11,217.91 in GST refunds. I am hoping to help more in our community file their taxes and access the tax-saving measures available to them.Over the month of January, my team and I have been working with our qualified volunteers to find a way to offer a tax clinic again this year for those who made under $35,000 in 2020, while also respecting provincial health guidelines. I’m pleased to announce that we’ve been able to find a way to continue providing this service to our community safely. If you are interested in having your taxes prepared through this free tax clinic, please call my office at 204-984-6432 for more information.In addition to this tax clinic, I’ve teamed up with the Assiniboia Chamber of Commerce, along with the office of small and medium enterprise within Public Services and Procurement Canada, to offer an information session on how local businesses can sell their products and services to the federal government.This information session will be held Feb. 26 from noon to 1 p.m., streaming live on my Facebook page at www.facebook.com/martymorantzWithin the presentation, we’ll be going over some facts of government procurement and tips on how local businesses in our community can bid on government contracts.  After the presentation there will be a question-and-answer. If there are specific questions you want addressed, please email them to me in advance at Marty.Morantz@parl.gc.ca If you aren’t already following my Facebook page, be sure to follow before Feb. 26 so that you can get a notification for this event and stay updated on the work I’m doing as your federal representative. Should you need any assistance navigating any federal department or have questions about policies enacted by the federal government, my office is always available to help.

In addition to bringing our community’s concerns forward, my office offers a number of services. These include providing support navigating federal departments and bringing attention to your applications and submissions for government programs and supports. 

Last year, before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, my office was happy to offer to a free tax clinic to those in our community with low incomes.

Last year we were able to help 35 people access $42,016.90 in tax refunds and $11,217.91 in GST refunds. I am hoping to help more in our community file their taxes and access the tax-saving measures available to them.

Friday, Feb. 5, 2021

Supplied photo
In addition to helping lower-income constituents with their taxes, MP Marty Morantz will host a live information session on selling products and services to the federal government on Feb. 26 at www.facebook.com/martymorantz

Plenty of work ahead in 2021

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Preview

Plenty of work ahead in 2021

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Friday, Jan. 15, 2021

To say 2020 was a difficult year would be an understatement. In March, our country and the world changed and so did our lives. Many began the task of transitioning to working from home and distancing from friends, family and loved ones. For others, jobs were lost or the businesses they worked so hard to get off the ground closed forever. For some, it was a year grieving loved ones who had passed.Despite these challenges, many in our city, province, and country stepped up on the front lines in hospitals, driving trucks, delivering groceries, and so much more. So many in our community throughout the pandemic came to me with ideas for policies that could support their neighbours. I was happy to push for them.On finance committee, I ensured the questions sent to me on issues to which the government had not yet provided an answer were raised. I ensured people from our community and city provided input on government programs and what next steps the government should take. In question period and in debate, I brought forward the questions and concerns emailed to me by members of our community, including those about changes to government supports for businesses, and a plan to support aviation workers, travel advisers and those looking for refunds.We were able to get a few of the ideas and improvements to programs done, including securing an increase to the wage subsidy from 10 per cent to 75 per cent; securing changes to the Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA) to help more small businesses keep their doors open during this pandemic; introducing Bill C-256, the Supporting Canadian Charities Act; passing a motion to create a three-digit suicide hotline; and passing a motion calling for a COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan so Canadians can know how much of each vaccine type will be available in Canada per month and when to expect them. Despite these successes, there is much more work to do in the year ahead. Travel advisers, pilots, flight attendants and air traffic controllers in our community and those needing refunds continue to sit waiting for the plan that was promised months ago. Rapid testing still isn’t readily available. The two Michaels continue to be arbitrarily detained in China. And we still need a plan to help people get back to work. I’m dedicated to getting these done.It’s going to be a busy year but ensuring those in our community have the support they need and their concerns addressed is why I’m an MP. If there is anything my office can do to assist, please don’t hesitate to send me an email at marty.morantz@parl.gc.ca Wishing you a safe and healthy new year.

To say 2020 was a difficult year would be an understatement.

In March, our country and the world changed and so did our lives. Many began the task of transitioning to working from home and distancing from friends, family and loved ones. For others, jobs were lost or the businesses they worked so hard to get off the ground closed forever. For some, it was a year grieving loved ones who had passed.

Despite these challenges, many in our city, province, and country stepped up on the front lines in hospitals, driving trucks, delivering groceries, and so much more. So many in our community throughout the pandemic came to me with ideas for policies that could support their neighbours. I was happy to push for them.

Friday, Jan. 15, 2021

To say 2020 was a difficult year would be an understatement. In March, our country and the world changed and so did our lives. Many began the task of transitioning to working from home and distancing from friends, family and loved ones. For others, jobs were lost or the businesses they worked so hard to get off the ground closed forever. For some, it was a year grieving loved ones who had passed.Despite these challenges, many in our city, province, and country stepped up on the front lines in hospitals, driving trucks, delivering groceries, and so much more. So many in our community throughout the pandemic came to me with ideas for policies that could support their neighbours. I was happy to push for them.On finance committee, I ensured the questions sent to me on issues to which the government had not yet provided an answer were raised. I ensured people from our community and city provided input on government programs and what next steps the government should take. In question period and in debate, I brought forward the questions and concerns emailed to me by members of our community, including those about changes to government supports for businesses, and a plan to support aviation workers, travel advisers and those looking for refunds.We were able to get a few of the ideas and improvements to programs done, including securing an increase to the wage subsidy from 10 per cent to 75 per cent; securing changes to the Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA) to help more small businesses keep their doors open during this pandemic; introducing Bill C-256, the Supporting Canadian Charities Act; passing a motion to create a three-digit suicide hotline; and passing a motion calling for a COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan so Canadians can know how much of each vaccine type will be available in Canada per month and when to expect them. Despite these successes, there is much more work to do in the year ahead. Travel advisers, pilots, flight attendants and air traffic controllers in our community and those needing refunds continue to sit waiting for the plan that was promised months ago. Rapid testing still isn’t readily available. The two Michaels continue to be arbitrarily detained in China. And we still need a plan to help people get back to work. I’m dedicated to getting these done.It’s going to be a busy year but ensuring those in our community have the support they need and their concerns addressed is why I’m an MP. If there is anything my office can do to assist, please don’t hesitate to send me an email at marty.morantz@parl.gc.ca Wishing you a safe and healthy new year.

To say 2020 was a difficult year would be an understatement.

In March, our country and the world changed and so did our lives. Many began the task of transitioning to working from home and distancing from friends, family and loved ones. For others, jobs were lost or the businesses they worked so hard to get off the ground closed forever. For some, it was a year grieving loved ones who had passed.

Despite these challenges, many in our city, province, and country stepped up on the front lines in hospitals, driving trucks, delivering groceries, and so much more. So many in our community throughout the pandemic came to me with ideas for policies that could support their neighbours. I was happy to push for them.

Plenty of work ahead in 2021

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Preview

Plenty of work ahead in 2021

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Friday, Jan. 8, 2021

To say 2020 was a difficult year would be an understatement. In March, our country and the world changed and so did our lives. Many began the task of transitioning to working from home and distancing from friends, family and loved ones. For others, jobs were lost or the businesses they worked so hard to get off the ground closed forever. For some, it was a year grieving loved ones who had passed.Despite these challenges, many in our city, province and country stepped up on the front lines in hospitals, driving trucks, delivering groceries, and so much more. So many in our community throughout the pandemic came to me with ideas for policies that could support their neighbours. I was happy to push for them.On the finance committee, I ensured the questions sent to me on issues to which the government had not yet provided an answer were raised. I ensured people from our community and city provided input on government programs and what next steps the government should take. In question period and in debate, I brought forward the questions and concerns emailed to me by members of our community, including those about changes to government supports for businesses, and a plan to support aviation workers, travel advisers and those looking for refunds.We were able to get a few of the ideas and improvements to programs done, including securing an increase to the wage subsidy from 10 per cent to 75 per cent; securing changes to the Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA) to help more small businesses keep their doors open during this pandemic; introducing Bill C-256, the Supporting Canadian Charities Act; passing a motion to create a three-digit suicide hotline; and passing a motion calling for a COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan so Canadians can know how much of each vaccine type will be available in Canada per month and when to expect them. Despite these successes, there is much more work to do in the year ahead. Travel advisers, pilots, flight attendants and air traffic controllers in our community and those needing refunds continue to sit waiting for the plan that was promised months ago. Rapid testing still isn’t readily available. The two Michaels continue to be arbitrarily detained in China. And we still need a plan to help people get back to work. I’m dedicated to getting these done.It’s going to be a busy year but ensuring those in our community have the support they need and their concerns addressed is why I’m an MP. If there is anything my office can do to assist, please don’t hesitate to send me an email at marty.morantz@parl.gc.ca Wishing you a safe and healthy new year.

To say 2020 was a difficult year would be an understatement. In March, our country and the world changed and so did our lives. 

Many began the task of transitioning to working from home and distancing from friends, family and loved ones. For others, jobs were lost or the businesses they worked so hard to get off the ground closed forever. For some, it was a year grieving loved ones who had passed.

Despite these challenges, many in our city, province and country stepped up on the front lines in hospitals, driving trucks, delivering groceries, and so much more. So many in our community throughout the pandemic came to me with ideas for policies that could support their neighbours. I was happy to push for them.

Friday, Jan. 8, 2021

Bernard Thibodeau / House of Com
MP Marty Morantz is pictured during question period in the House of Commons on Oct. 7, 2020.

Charities act will ease rules of giving

Marty Morantz 4 minute read Preview

Charities act will ease rules of giving

Marty Morantz 4 minute read Friday, Dec. 11, 2020

 

During the season of giving we often look to support the charities that have supported many in our community through the tough times. We offer this support in a variety of ways, including volunteering and donating.On Nov. 26, I tabled Bill C-256, the Supporting Canadian Charities Act. This legislation will help charities by waiving the capital gains tax on an arm’s-length sale of private shares or real estate when the proceeds of the sale are donated to a charity. This change will allow these kinds of donations to receive similar tax treatment to when public shares are donated to a charity.According to reports tabled at a special Senate committee, Bill C-256 will generate up to $200 million a year in new donations to help charities continue to offer their much-needed services.During COVID-19 many charities have continued to step up and provide much needed services to those in need, including food banks, homeless shelters, and those providing counselling. There are other charities that have had to suspend or limit their operations owing to COVID-19, including children’s programs, disability programs, and many others.Sadly, many Canadian charities are struggling to raise much needed funds during this pandemic. Their traditional fundraisers aren’t an option, and many of their traditional donors can no longer afford to make a monthly donation. All this is leaving charities across Canada struggling, causing them to stretch their already thin resources even further. If passed, the Supporting Canadian Charities Act could make a huge difference and provide new opportunities that will allow charities to expand and offer their services to more of those in need of their support.The Grace Hospital Foundation, St.Amant, Special Olympics Canada, the Bruce Oake Memorial Foundation, Diabetes Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation, Oasis Church, and other charities have voiced their support of this timely and important bill.This common-sense legislation is a way to help struggling charities and allow Canadians to give back. My hope is that my colleagues from all parties will vote “yes” to pass this important legislation.You can learn more at SupportCanadianCharities.ca 

During the season of giving we often look to support the charities that have supported many in our community through the tough times. We offer this support in a variety of ways, including volunteering and donating.

On Nov. 26, I tabled Bill C-256, the Supporting Canadian Charities Act. This legislation will help charities by waiving the capital gains tax on an arm’s-length sale of private shares or real estate when the proceeds of the sale are donated to a charity. This change will allow these kinds of donations to receive similar tax treatment to when public shares are donated to a charity.

Friday, Dec. 11, 2020

Supplied photo
Charleswood-St.James-Assiniboia-Headingly MP Marty Morantz tabled the Supporting Canadian Charities Act in the House of Commons on Nov. 26.

Help should only be three digits away

Marty Morantz 4 minute read Preview

Help should only be three digits away

Marty Morantz 4 minute read Friday, Nov. 13, 2020

 

As we continue to battle the coronavirus pandemic, there have been many factors which have led to challenges for many across the country. Increased isolation, physical distancing, and both health and financial concerns have led to heightened anxiety, depression, substance abuse and a suicide crisis.Research conducted by the Canadian Mental Health Association has shown that more Canadians, especially the most vulnerable, are thinking about suicide. We are also seeing First Nations communities across Canada battling a suicide epidemic. In October, Sioux Valley First Nation in Manitoba declared a state of emergency after four of its community members died by suicide in a single month.Canada’s Suicide Prevention Hotline has experienced a call increase of 200 per cent during the pandemic, leading to increased wait times. Imagine calling 911 during an emergency and being asked to hold the line, or worse, getting an automated message. This is unacceptable.Currently, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline in Canada is a standard 10-digit number that I would argue is an unnecessary barrier. When someone is in crisis and at the point at which they want to ask for help, a simple three-digit, easy-to-remember number could make the difference between a life saved and a life lost.Recently, my colleague Todd Doherty (Cariboo-Prince George) tabled a motion in Parliament to consolidate existing suicide prevention services into a single national three-digit phone number that is accessible to all Canadians. He proposed using 988 as this number. The United States has acted in this regard by passing bipartisan legislation. Starting in 2022, Americans will have access to a simple, easy to remember three-digit National Suicide Prevention Hotline. Here at home, there is no reason why we cannot do the same. A true Team Canada approach means working together, across party lines for the benefit of all Canadians. This lifesaving initiative needs to be passed and implemented immediately. As leaders, Canadians are counting on us and we need to be there for them. Please call or email your local Member of Parliament and express your support for this motion to designate 988 as Canada’s National Suicide Prevention Hotline.  Help should only be three digits away. 

As we continue to battle the coronavirus pandemic, there have been many factors which have led to challenges for many across the country. Increased isolation, physical distancing, and both health and financial concerns have led to heightened anxiety, depression, substance abuse and a suicide crisis.

Research conducted by the Canadian Mental Health Association has shown that more Canadians, especially the most vulnerable, are thinking about suicide. We are also seeing First Nations communities across Canada battling a suicide epidemic. 

Friday, Nov. 13, 2020

Bernard Thibodeau / House of Com
MP Marty Morantz is pictured in Question Period oin the House of Commons on Oct. 7. Bernard Thibodeau, House of Commons Photo Services

Canadians deserve access to tests

By Marty Morantz 3 minute read Preview

Canadians deserve access to tests

By Marty Morantz 3 minute read Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020

Across the country, Canadians have waited in lines for hours on end and, in some cases, have already been turned away from getting a COVID-19 test.

Those lucky enough to get tested have then needed to wait days in isolation, worrying if they have COVID-19, while those living in countries such as Germany and the U.K. are able to get results in 15 minutes.

Scientists around the world have always said that easily accessible testing is the key to combatting the spread of COVID-19 while helping people live normal lives. Rapid and at-home testing measures can help us see loved ones, go to work and participate in activities we love.

Without rapid testing, people are waiting days for results and losing pay cheques because they can’t go to work. If they are front-line workers, they can’t help people in need until they get their results back many days later.

Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020

Christian Diotte, House of Commons Photo Services
MP Marty Morantz asks a question in the House of Commons during Question Period on Oct. 5.

Canadians deserve access to rapid tests

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Preview

Canadians deserve access to rapid tests

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Friday, Oct. 16, 2020

Across the country, Canadians have waited in lines for hours on end and, in some cases, have already been turned away from getting a COVID-19 test. Those lucky enough to get tested have then needed to wait days in isolation, worrying if they have COVID-19, while those living in countries such as Germany and the U.K. are able to get results in 15 minutes.Scientists around the world have always said that easily accessible testing is the key to combatting the spread of COVID-19 while helping people live normal lives. Rapid and at-home testing measures can help us see loved ones, go to work and participate in activities we love.Without rapid testing, people are waiting days for results and losing paycheques because they can’t go to work. If they are front-line workers, they can’t help people in need until they get their results back many days later. Those living with disabilities or who have young children need access to at-home testing options because, in many cases, they aren’t able to stand in long lines all day.Many of our G7 allies have already had access to rapid and at-home testing for months. Now they are contributing to an initiative to ensure that low-income countries have those same tests. Why aren’t Canadians getting those testing options?The federal government has finally approved one rapid testing device, while 10 other Canadian rapid-testing devices remain in review. While the approval of any rapid test is good news, the federal government blocked provinces from being able to buy them directly. Instead, provinces will have to wait for the federal government to purchase these tests and ration them out as they see fit.This added level of government has created further delays for Canadians who need tests. There are also serious concerns that provinces won’t get all the rapid tests they need after the federal government previously stopped the provincial government from purchasing N95 masks, with Manitoba only receiving a fraction of what we need.Canadians have done their part for months because they believed their government was developing an actual plan. But once again, the Liberal government has let Canadians down. This is part of a larger pattern of federal inaction or slow-to-react pandemic policies that have cost us precious time. I will continue to use my voice to fight so you can get a real plan from the federal government to deal with the second wave. Our government must not stand idly by.

Across the country, Canadians have waited in lines for hours on end and, in some cases, have already been turned away from getting a COVID-19 test. 

Those lucky enough to get tested have then needed to wait days in isolation, worrying about if they have COVID-19, while those living in countries such as Germany and the U.K. are able to get results in 15 minutes.

Scientists around the world have always said that easily accessible testing is the key to combatting the spread of COVID-19 while helping people live normal lives. Rapid and at-home testing measures can help us see loved ones, go to work and participate in activities we love.

Friday, Oct. 16, 2020

Christian Diotte, House of Commo
MP Marty Morantz asks a question in the House of Commons during Question Period on Oct. 5.

The path to recovery and the throne speech

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Preview

The path to recovery and the throne speech

Marty Morantz 5 minute read Thursday, Sep. 17, 2020

This week there will be a speech from the throne. This important speech is one that Canadians should watch Wednesday morning, as it will outline the government’s priorities for the upcoming parliamentary session. Right now, our federal government has the important task of paving the road to recovery. This speech will need to outline a clear path forward that helps Canadians get back to work, while ensuring Canada’s future is bright and protected. A post-COVID recession will be very different from the one that followed the 2008-09 financial crisis that, thanks to the previous Conservative government, Canada weathered better than any other G7 nation.Quarter-trillion-dollar deficits put our country at risk. If this type of spending continues, the Liberals will jeopardize our Old Age Security system, health care and the social safety net funded by general revenues upon which Canadians rely. That’s why I will be looking for a path forward in the speech from the throne that establishes a clear and disciplined plan for balance that grows the economy while helping people return to work.Within that plan there must be clear support for critical industries that have been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic to help get their workers back to work, including the aviation and tourism industries. These industries have presented plenty of creative solutions, such as on-site testing at airports, that have yet to be acknowledged by the government. It is my hope the speech from the throne will change that.In April, I joined fellow Conservative  MP Pierre Poilievre in calling on the government to waive mandatory RRIF withdrawals and to  allow Canadians to access a one-time withdrawal from their RRSPs tax-free, similar to the first-time homebuyer’s tax credit. This initiative will give Canadians who are struggling to make ends meet, including small business owners and seniors, access to their own funds, and it’s important the government make these options available.Earlier this year, when it was found that many legions across Canada couldn’t access emergency government support programs, the Minister of Veterans Affairs promised Canadian legions that support would be on the way yet, to-date, no support has been announced. Legions have been an important place to gather for many military members, their families and members of our community. Losing them would be a great loss and that is why I will be looking to hear an outline for how the government plans to support them. During the speech from the throne, I will be listening closely to ensure that the path towards recovery outlined will support members of our community and the places within our community we love, while also ensuring our future is bright.

This week there will be a speech from the throne. This important speech is one that Canadians should watch Wednesday morning, as it will outline the government’s priorities for the upcoming parliamentary session. 

Right now, our federal government has the important task of paving the road to recovery. This speech will need to outline a clear path forward that helps Canadians get back to work, while ensuring Canada’s future is bright and protected. 

A post-COVID recession will be very different from the one that followed the 2008-09 financial crisis that, thanks to the previous Conservative government, Canada weathered better than any other G7 nation.

Thursday, Sep. 17, 2020

Supplied photo by Bernard Thibod
Charleswood-St. James-Assiniboia-Headingley Conservative MP Marty Morantz will be closely watching this week’s throne speech.

Time to use your fort-making skills

By Marty Morantz 2 minute read Preview

Time to use your fort-making skills

By Marty Morantz 2 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020

Canadian Armed Forces members and their families have made great sacrifices to keep Canada the true north, strong and free, while also protecting people around the world.

During the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic, 1,700 military families answered the call of duty, sending their loved ones to provide emergency assistance at long-term care facilities, which tragically experienced more than 80 per cent of Canada’s deaths in that time period. Almost 50 military personnel tested positive for the virus after serving on the front lines of Operation LASER.

Behind every one of our brave men and women are family and friends supporting them every step of the way. Having a day dedicated to showing our gratitude to our military families is an occasion my family and I believe is very important, especially given the circumstances and tragedies our military has encountered since the start of 2020.

That’s why I’m so proud to join the Together We Stand Foundation n celebrating Canada’s military community, marking our nation’s second annual Military Family Appreciation Day on Sept. 18.

Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020

Supplied photo
MP Marty Morantz and wife Lisa are pictured in the fort they made for the Home Fort Challenge.

Time to brush off your fort-making skills

Marty Morantz — Charleswood-St James-Assiniboia-Headingley MP Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

Time to brush off your fort-making skills

Marty Morantz — Charleswood-St James-Assiniboia-Headingley MP Constituency Report 5 minute read Monday, Aug. 24, 2020

Canadian Armed Forces members and their families have made great sacrifices to keep Canada the true north, strong and free, while also protecting people around the world.During the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic, 1,700 military families answered the call of duty, sending their loved ones to provide emergency assistance at long-term care facilities, which tragically experienced more than 80 per cent of Canada’s deaths in that time period. Almost 50 military personnel tested positive for the virus after serving on the front lines of Operation LASER.Behind every one of our brave men and women are family and friends supporting them every step of the way. Having a day dedicated to showing our gratitude to our military families is an occasion my family and I believe is very important, especially given the circumstances and tragedies our military has encountered since the start of 2020. That’s why I’m so proud to join the Together We Stand Foundation n celebrating Canada’s military community, marking our nation’s second annual Military Family Appreciation Day on Sept. 18.This year, TWS is asking Canadians to participate in the coast-to-coast-to-coast Home Fort Challenge from Sept. 1-18. You can participate by building a fort (pillow or other forms) with your family or colleagues to honour those who maintain life at their Home Forts while their loved ones are away. After you’ve built your fort with your loved ones, be sure to grab a picture and post to social media with the hashtag #HomeFortChallenge.The goal of MFAD is to raise awareness of the challenges that military families face, to recognize their resilience and to thank them for their sacrifices as they support their loved ones serving in the Canadian Armed Forces. Simply put, their Home Forts are the places of safety and security that military members return to when their work to protect the safety and security of Canada is done.The work our military members and their families undertake certainly isn’t easy. The work and sacrifices they make are difficult, both emotionally and physically. We all owe them a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid, however even the smallest acts can mean so much. This September, please consider taking part in the Home Fort Challenge to honour our amazing military families and all they sacrifice to help keep us strong and free.

Canadian Armed Forces members and their families have made great sacrifices to keep Canada the true north, strong and free, while also protecting people around the world.

During the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic, 1,700 military families answered the call of duty, sending their loved ones to provide emergency assistance at long-term care facilities, which tragically experienced more than 80 per cent of Canada’s deaths in that time period. Almost 50 military personnel tested positive for the virus after serving on the front lines of Operation LASER.

Behind every one of our brave men and women are family and friends supporting them every step of the way. Having a day dedicated to showing our gratitude to our military families is an occasion my family and I believe is very important, especially given the circumstances and tragedies our military has encountered since the start of 2020. That’s why I’m so proud to join the Together We Stand Foundation in celebrating Canada’s military community, marking our nation’s second annual Military Family Appreciation Day on Sept. 18.

Monday, Aug. 24, 2020

Supplied photo
MP Marty Morantz and wife Lisa are pictured in the fort they made for the Home Fort Challenge.