Matt Wiebe

Matt Wiebe

Concordia constituency report

Matt Wiebe is the NDP MLA for Concordia.

Recent articles of Matt Wiebe

Happy days are here again…

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Preview

Happy days are here again…

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 6, 2022

Summer festivals and activities are back in full-swing this year; and after the harsh winter and wet spring we’ve all experienced, Manitobans are eager to reconnect with their neighbours and have some fun.

One of my favourite community events is Happy Days on Henderson. This family-friendly event brings people together from Elmwood and beyond to celebrate our community. Happy Days holds a special place for me personally as I’ve volunteered and supported the event for years. Thirteen years ago my wife and I even managed to stop in on our wedding day, where we shared our first dance on the lawn in front of the main stage!

This year I agreed to participate in the notorious dunk tank. Some of the young throwers had remarkable aim, so needless to say was dunked in the cold water more than a few times — but I was happy to help out as all donations raised went to a good cause. With an estimated 3,500 people attending, this year’s Happy Days was a huge success. Thank you to the many, many volunteers and organizers and congratulations on 20 years of bringing our community together.

I was also excited to attend the Hi Neighbour festival in Transcona with MLA Nello Altomare and NDP leader Wab Kinew. After attending the unveiling of the refurbished Hi Neighbour Sam statue on Regent, we made our way to the bustling midway to take in the opening ceremonies. While we all certainly miss the parade portion of the event, the enhanced activity on the main stage made for a great weekend.

Wednesday, Jul. 6, 2022

ConcordiaMLA Matt Wiebe (above right) happily agreed to sit in the dunk tank as the Happy Days festival returned to Henderson Highway this year.

PCs must put their money where the roads are

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Preview

PCs must put their money where the roads are

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Wednesday, May. 18, 2022

Spring has finally arrived in Manitoba, and along with the warm weather and green grass, the potholes have also returned, this year worse than ever. I’ve been taking advantage of the nice weather to knock on doors and talk to constituents about their concerns, and over and over again I have heard that the state of our roads and highways is a top issue.

While there’s no question that it’s been an exceptionally long and harsh winter and spring, the potholes and poor road conditions in Winnipeg and across the province are no accident. For seven budgets in a row, the provincial Progressive Conservative government has frozen its funding to municipalities across the province, including to the City of Winnipeg. That means that municipalities have been forced to do more with less and are trying to deal with 2022 issues with 2016 funding. With construction inflation at an all time high, it’s no wonder cities are unable to safely maintain our roads.

Before the PCs were elected, municipal funding increased every year and a focus on roads began to tackle the infrastructure deficit. In addition, I was proud to secure one-time provincial funding for priority projects, such as the upgrades on Molson Street and Panet Road. Had this government continued to invest in our roads and in our communities, road conditions would look much different today.

Likewise, spending on provincial highways also continues to fall short. The government has underspent its highways budget every single year since it was elected, leaving many in very poor condition. These highways become dangerous, as potholes force people to swerve, increasing their chances of an accident. Since coming into office, the PCs have left $166 millionfor highways unspent, and this year’s budget once again follows the same pattern. This has become a severe safety issue.

Wednesday, May. 18, 2022

Spring has finally arrived in Manitoba, and along with the warm weather and green grass, the potholes have also returned, this year worse than ever. I’ve been taking advantage of the nice weather to knock on doors and talk to constituents about their concerns, and over and over again I have heard that the state of our roads and highways is a top issue.

While there’s no question that it’s been an exceptionally long and harsh winter and spring, the potholes and poor road conditions in Winnipeg and across the province are no accident. For seven budgets in a row, the provincial Progressive Conservative government has frozen its funding to municipalities across the province, including to the City of Winnipeg. That means that municipalities have been forced to do more with less and are trying to deal with 2022 issues with 2016 funding. With construction inflation at an all time high, it’s no wonder cities are unable to safely maintain our roads.

Before the PCs were elected, municipal funding increased every year and a focus on roads began to tackle the infrastructure deficit. In addition, I was proud to secure one-time provincial funding for priority projects, such as the upgrades on Molson Street and Panet Road. Had this government continued to invest in our roads and in our communities, road conditions would look much different today.

Likewise, spending on provincial highways also continues to fall short. The government has underspent its highways budget every single year since it was elected, leaving many in very poor condition. These highways become dangerous, as potholes force people to swerve, increasing their chances of an accident. Since coming into office, the PCs have left $166 millionfor highways unspent, and this year’s budget once again follows the same pattern. This has become a severe safety issue.

Krystal Mousseau’s life mattered

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Preview

Krystal Mousseau’s life mattered

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Wednesday, Mar. 30, 2022

Krystal Mousseau’s life mattered. She was a 31-year-old mother of two who contracted COVID-19 and went to hospital in Brandon on May 24, 2021, at the height of the third wave of the pandemic. Because our health-care system was overwhelmed, a decision was made to move Krystal to Ottawa for treatment. Despite having no underlying health issues, she died while being transported. My condolences go out to her family and friends.

Krystal’s story is important because it highlights the devastating losses that occurred during a dark time in our province. With intensive care unity capacity overwhelmed, 57 patients were ultimately transported out of Manitoba — more than double the amount of any other province — all while Health Minister Heather Stefanson assured Manitobans there was no crisis in our health-care system and adequate ICU capacity.

New information shows that the transportation company contracted by the government may not have been properly trained and didn’t have the right equipment to move patients. A critical incident investigation into the circumstances that led to her death has revealed there was a failure to put formal policies, standards or requirements in place to keep Krystal and other patients safe.

That is why, in conjunction with the family, the Manitoba NDP is asking the Progressive Conservative government to call an inquiry so that any systemic failures are known and her family can get the closure it deserves. Krystal Mousseau’s life mattered, and that’s why we cannot allow the questions about her death to go unanswered — but the government continues to say no to her family’s call for an inquiry.

Wednesday, Mar. 30, 2022

Krystal Mousseau of Ebb and Flow First Nation died last May after an attempted transport to an out-of-province hospital after Manitoba’s intensive care units became overwhelmed with COVID patients.

Health-care cuts affect local families

Matt Wiebe 5 minute read Preview

Health-care cuts affect local families

Matt Wiebe 5 minute read Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2022

As we near two years of the COVID-19 pandemic in Manitoba, the Omicron variant continues to push our health-care system to the brink. Throughout January, we saw day after day of hospitalizations nearing capacity and frontline healthcare workers reaching their breaking point.After years of funding freezes and cuts by the Progressive Conservatives, coupled with a hasty consolidation that created more bureaucracy and less supports at the bedside, our system has been strained more severely than other provinces during this pandemic. From closing the Concordia Emergency Room and Misericordia Urgent Care, to firing nurses and the loss of intensive-care beds in communities, this government’s underfunding of the health-care system has had consequences. Not only has our ability to provide adequate care to our sickest patients been affected, but our hospitals also lack the capacity to care for all patients in the system. Manitobans are experiencing long delays in getting tests, consultations and appointments for important medical procedures, and the surgery backlog has been steadily increasing with over 152,000 Manitobans now on the waiting list.At Concordia Hospital, a Winnipeg family was reduced to tears and distress after an elderly loved one with advanced dementia, was transferred hundreds of kilometres away from home to make room for COVID-19 patients. The Apalit family reached out to the Manitoba NDP to shed light on this issue and to demand the PC government to do better. Since October, over 250 Manitoba families have been forced to say goodbye to a loved one as they are transported hours away for healthcare — leaving families unable to be at the bedside and pay out of pocket to visit their loved ones.At the height of the Omicron wave, Premier Stefanson conceded that her government wouldn’t be able to protect everyone and said “…its up to Manitobans to look after themselves.”This statement epitomizes her response to the pandemic, first as heath minister during the second and third waves, and now as premier. Rather than admitting the health-care system is in crisis, she refuses to be held accountable for her government’s cuts and take the steps necessary to create capacity and protect Manitobans. We believe the government has an important role to play in protecting Manitobans by upholding public health orders, getting vaccinated, and investing in our healthcare system.If you are personally feeling the impacts of Manitoba’s broken health-care system, please don’t hesitate to contact me and to share your story. I can be reached at matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca or at 204-654-1857.

As we near two years of the COVID-19 pandemic in Manitoba, the Omicron variant continues to push our health-care system to the brink. Throughout January, we saw day after day of hospitalizations nearing capacity and frontline healthcare workers reaching their breaking point.

After years of funding freezes and cuts by the Progressive Conservatives, coupled with a hasty consolidation that created more bureaucracy and less supports at the bedside, our system has been strained more severely than other provinces during this pandemic. 

From closing the Concordia Emergency Room and Misericordia Urgent Care, to firing nurses and the loss of intensive-care beds in communities, this government’s underfunding of the health-care system has had consequences. 

Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2022

As we near two years of the COVID-19 pandemic in Manitoba, the Omicron variant continues to push our health-care system to the brink. Throughout January, we saw day after day of hospitalizations nearing capacity and frontline healthcare workers reaching their breaking point.After years of funding freezes and cuts by the Progressive Conservatives, coupled with a hasty consolidation that created more bureaucracy and less supports at the bedside, our system has been strained more severely than other provinces during this pandemic. From closing the Concordia Emergency Room and Misericordia Urgent Care, to firing nurses and the loss of intensive-care beds in communities, this government’s underfunding of the health-care system has had consequences. Not only has our ability to provide adequate care to our sickest patients been affected, but our hospitals also lack the capacity to care for all patients in the system. Manitobans are experiencing long delays in getting tests, consultations and appointments for important medical procedures, and the surgery backlog has been steadily increasing with over 152,000 Manitobans now on the waiting list.At Concordia Hospital, a Winnipeg family was reduced to tears and distress after an elderly loved one with advanced dementia, was transferred hundreds of kilometres away from home to make room for COVID-19 patients. The Apalit family reached out to the Manitoba NDP to shed light on this issue and to demand the PC government to do better. Since October, over 250 Manitoba families have been forced to say goodbye to a loved one as they are transported hours away for healthcare — leaving families unable to be at the bedside and pay out of pocket to visit their loved ones.At the height of the Omicron wave, Premier Stefanson conceded that her government wouldn’t be able to protect everyone and said “…its up to Manitobans to look after themselves.”This statement epitomizes her response to the pandemic, first as heath minister during the second and third waves, and now as premier. Rather than admitting the health-care system is in crisis, she refuses to be held accountable for her government’s cuts and take the steps necessary to create capacity and protect Manitobans. We believe the government has an important role to play in protecting Manitobans by upholding public health orders, getting vaccinated, and investing in our healthcare system.If you are personally feeling the impacts of Manitoba’s broken health-care system, please don’t hesitate to contact me and to share your story. I can be reached at matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca or at 204-654-1857.

As we near two years of the COVID-19 pandemic in Manitoba, the Omicron variant continues to push our health-care system to the brink. Throughout January, we saw day after day of hospitalizations nearing capacity and frontline healthcare workers reaching their breaking point.

After years of funding freezes and cuts by the Progressive Conservatives, coupled with a hasty consolidation that created more bureaucracy and less supports at the bedside, our system has been strained more severely than other provinces during this pandemic. 

From closing the Concordia Emergency Room and Misericordia Urgent Care, to firing nurses and the loss of intensive-care beds in communities, this government’s underfunding of the health-care system has had consequences. 

Christmas in Concordia

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

Christmas in Concordia

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Thursday, Dec. 30, 2021

 

As we make our way through another Christmas in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s critical we stay vigilant and do our best to keep our holiday celebrations safe. With the Omicron variant here in Manitoba, it’s important that we limit our gathering sizes, get vaccinated, and take a COVID-19 test if we feel sick. By staying prudent, we’ve been able to cautiously restore some of the holiday traditions we missed out on in 2020 and, hopefully, many of you have been able to spend time with your loved ones.At the beginning of this month, I had a chance to safely deliver holiday poinsettia plants to community centres and seniors’ organizations around our neighbourhood. I also took the opportunity to drop off Christmas oranges to child-care centres around Concordia, helping bring holiday cheer to children and early childhood dducators alike. Meanwhile, many Christmas traditions such as breakfasts with Santa were restored with social distancing in mind, like at 180 Poplar Ave., where I helped flip pancakes and safely serve meals in early December.For some organizations in our neighbourhood, however, the pandemic has meant we’ve had to create new holiday traditions.At the Elmwood Community Resource Centre, I teamed up with their Christmas hamper delivery team to support families in need, which was followed by a virtual Letters to Santa event hosted online. In Valley Gardens, the community centre opted out of its annual Christmas breakfast, so I joined folks there for an outdoor skate with Santa to keep things COVID-safe. For seniors, I helped serve meals at the Elmwood East Kildonan Active Living Centre’s Christmas lunch, which was switched to a pickup-only event this year to avoid large gatherings.Whether it’s through tried-and-true Christmas traditions or new events done differently in the wake of COVID-19, it’s been a pleasure connecting with our community this holiday season. On behalf of the NDP caucus and the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba, I wish to extend a merry Christmas and a happy new year to you and your family. Let’s all keep doing our part to stay safe and make sure next year’s holiday season can be even better.As always, my office can be reached at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca   

As we make our way through another Christmas in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s critical we stay vigilant and do our best to keep our holiday celebrations safe. With the Omicron variant here in Manitoba, it’s important that we limit our gathering sizes, get vaccinated, and take a COVID-19 test if we feel sick. By staying prudent, we’ve been able to cautiously restore some of the holiday traditions we missed out on in 2020 and, hopefully, many of you have been able to spend time with your loved ones.

At the beginning of this month, I had a chance to safely deliver holiday poinsettia plants to community centres and seniors’ organizations around our neighbourhood. I also took the opportunity to drop off Christmas oranges to child-care centres around Concordia, helping bring holiday cheer to children and early childhood educators alike. 

Thursday, Dec. 30, 2021

Supplied photo by Nina Thach
Matt was pleased to stop by Valley Gardens Community Centre’s socially-distanced Skate with Santa event earlier this month.

Kids’ vaccine rollout should learn from past

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

Kids’ vaccine rollout should learn from past

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021

Earlier in November, thousands of families across northeast Winnipeg breathed a collective sigh of relief as they learned their kids are finally eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Now, over 100,000 children aged 5 to 11 across Manitoba will finally have a chance to roll up their sleeves and get the protection they need from COVID-19.Vaccinating thousands of the youngest Manitobans means making sure that the provincial government creates a vaccine rollout plan that’s efficient, equitable, and effective, while learning lessons from the rocky vaccine distribution to adults earlier this year.Whether it was refusing to initially release critical COVID infection data showing where the pandemic hit the hardest, not prioritizing vaccinations for many front-line workers and those at highest risk, or drafting confusing plans to send educators and childcare workers to North Dakota to get their shots, the first vaccine rollout was marked by countless mistakes, delays, and half-baked policies.A life-saving immunization campaign should have been at the top of the government’s radar, yet the blunders of the Progressive Conservatives’ vaccine rollout left many behind for too long.It wasn’t just the vaccine rollout that the government fumbled, though. As families faced tough choices and made sacrifices during the peak of the pandemic, the PCs remained steadfast on gutting health care and slashing services. In northeast Winnipeg, we saw the consolidation of blood and fluid testing clinics, the closure of our local CancerCare facility, and the cut of an IV clinic that served as a lifeline for many. All the while, our hospitals remained understaffed and our intensive-care units packed.These cuts had consequences, and meant some Manitobans had their loved ones sent out of province for care — often with heartbreaking outcomes.Our NDP team has called on the government to learn from these mistakes and do better. That’s why we’re advocating for an independent inquiry into the PC government’s pandemic response to ensure the children’s vaccine rollout is the best it can be and to prevent them from making the same mistakes again. It’s time we take an honest look at the pandemic response while listening to experts such as ICU doctors, nurses, and epidemiologists, and make sure that their independent recommendations are implemented.If you would like to share your thoughts on how the government can learn from their mistakes and strengthen our health-care system, my office can be reached at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

Earlier in November, thousands of families across northeast Winnipeg breathed a collective sigh of relief as they learned their kids are finally eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Now, over 100,000 children aged 5 to 11 across Manitoba will finally have a chance to roll up their sleeves and get the protection they need from COVID-19.

Vaccinating thousands of the youngest Manitobans means making sure that the provincial government creates a vaccine rollout plan that’s efficient, equitable, and effective, while learning lessons from the rocky vaccine distribution to adults earlier this year.

Whether it was refusing to initially release critical COVID infection data showing where the pandemic hit the hardest, not prioritizing vaccinations for many front-line workers and those at highest risk, or drafting confusing plans to send educators and childcare workers to North Dakota to get their shots, the first vaccine rollout was marked by countless mistakes, delays, and half-baked policies.

Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021

Earlier in November, thousands of families across northeast Winnipeg breathed a collective sigh of relief as they learned their kids are finally eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Now, over 100,000 children aged 5 to 11 across Manitoba will finally have a chance to roll up their sleeves and get the protection they need from COVID-19.Vaccinating thousands of the youngest Manitobans means making sure that the provincial government creates a vaccine rollout plan that’s efficient, equitable, and effective, while learning lessons from the rocky vaccine distribution to adults earlier this year.Whether it was refusing to initially release critical COVID infection data showing where the pandemic hit the hardest, not prioritizing vaccinations for many front-line workers and those at highest risk, or drafting confusing plans to send educators and childcare workers to North Dakota to get their shots, the first vaccine rollout was marked by countless mistakes, delays, and half-baked policies.A life-saving immunization campaign should have been at the top of the government’s radar, yet the blunders of the Progressive Conservatives’ vaccine rollout left many behind for too long.It wasn’t just the vaccine rollout that the government fumbled, though. As families faced tough choices and made sacrifices during the peak of the pandemic, the PCs remained steadfast on gutting health care and slashing services. In northeast Winnipeg, we saw the consolidation of blood and fluid testing clinics, the closure of our local CancerCare facility, and the cut of an IV clinic that served as a lifeline for many. All the while, our hospitals remained understaffed and our intensive-care units packed.These cuts had consequences, and meant some Manitobans had their loved ones sent out of province for care — often with heartbreaking outcomes.Our NDP team has called on the government to learn from these mistakes and do better. That’s why we’re advocating for an independent inquiry into the PC government’s pandemic response to ensure the children’s vaccine rollout is the best it can be and to prevent them from making the same mistakes again. It’s time we take an honest look at the pandemic response while listening to experts such as ICU doctors, nurses, and epidemiologists, and make sure that their independent recommendations are implemented.If you would like to share your thoughts on how the government can learn from their mistakes and strengthen our health-care system, my office can be reached at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

Earlier in November, thousands of families across northeast Winnipeg breathed a collective sigh of relief as they learned their kids are finally eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Now, over 100,000 children aged 5 to 11 across Manitoba will finally have a chance to roll up their sleeves and get the protection they need from COVID-19.

Vaccinating thousands of the youngest Manitobans means making sure that the provincial government creates a vaccine rollout plan that’s efficient, equitable, and effective, while learning lessons from the rocky vaccine distribution to adults earlier this year.

Whether it was refusing to initially release critical COVID infection data showing where the pandemic hit the hardest, not prioritizing vaccinations for many front-line workers and those at highest risk, or drafting confusing plans to send educators and childcare workers to North Dakota to get their shots, the first vaccine rollout was marked by countless mistakes, delays, and half-baked policies.

Cuts, Perimeter changes put road users at risk

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

Cuts, Perimeter changes put road users at risk

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021

For motorists across our province, roads and highways that get us where we’re going safely and efficiently should be a top priority for the government. After all, smart investments in infrastructure help keep families safe on the road, build our economy through trade, and create good jobs at the same time. Unfortunately, Manitobans are once again seeing underspending and mismanagement from the Progressive Conservative government — which continues to put our roads at risk.Over the last few months, commuters in northeast Winnipeg may have noticed some changes along the north Perimeter. Many access roads along the highway have seen their intersections with the Perimeter cut off, with no new investments in upgraded infrastructure, paved roads, or proper ways to safely and efficiently divert traffic.Despite their own consultations, which flagged this as a concern for residents and business owners, the government has pushed ahead with their plan by simply removing the access roads with zero infrastructure upgrades. This means many neighbourhoods are left with less access to their communities, emergency vehicles and response teams will have to travel further, and local businesses could struggle with a loss of customers due to their access roads being cut off.The government’s refusal to meaningfully invest in this project is no surprise. After years of underspending their own budgets on our roads and highways, Manitobans recently learned that the PC government cut hundreds of jobs from Manitoba’s Infrastructure department. In fact, almost 400 job vacancies exist in highway maintenance alone, with dozens of others coming from areas like road safety. It’s no wonder our roads are in such dire need of repair.Putting infrastructure upgrades and maintenance at the top of the agenda should be a no-brainer. As the MLA for Concordia and NDP caucus critic for infrastructure, advocating for safer, well-kept streets and highways is one of my top priorities. I will continue advocating for better investments in infrastructure to keep Manitoba moving and create the jobs we need emerging from the pandemic.Let me know which streets and highways across Manitoba you think need to be fixed most. As always, my office can be reached at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

For motorists across our province, roads and highways that get us where we’re going safely and efficiently should be a top priority for the government. After all, smart investments in infrastructure help keep families safe on the road, build our economy through trade, and create good jobs at the same time. 

Unfortunately, Manitobans are once again seeing underspending and mismanagement from the Progressive Conservative government — which continues to put our roads at risk.

Over the last few months, commuters in northeast Winnipeg may have noticed some changes along the north Perimeter. Many access roads along the highway have seen their intersections with the Perimeter cut off, with no new investments in upgraded infrastructure, paved roads, or proper ways to safely and efficiently divert traffic.

Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021

For motorists across our province, roads and highways that get us where we’re going safely and efficiently should be a top priority for the government. After all, smart investments in infrastructure help keep families safe on the road, build our economy through trade, and create good jobs at the same time. Unfortunately, Manitobans are once again seeing underspending and mismanagement from the Progressive Conservative government — which continues to put our roads at risk.Over the last few months, commuters in northeast Winnipeg may have noticed some changes along the north Perimeter. Many access roads along the highway have seen their intersections with the Perimeter cut off, with no new investments in upgraded infrastructure, paved roads, or proper ways to safely and efficiently divert traffic.Despite their own consultations, which flagged this as a concern for residents and business owners, the government has pushed ahead with their plan by simply removing the access roads with zero infrastructure upgrades. This means many neighbourhoods are left with less access to their communities, emergency vehicles and response teams will have to travel further, and local businesses could struggle with a loss of customers due to their access roads being cut off.The government’s refusal to meaningfully invest in this project is no surprise. After years of underspending their own budgets on our roads and highways, Manitobans recently learned that the PC government cut hundreds of jobs from Manitoba’s Infrastructure department. In fact, almost 400 job vacancies exist in highway maintenance alone, with dozens of others coming from areas like road safety. It’s no wonder our roads are in such dire need of repair.Putting infrastructure upgrades and maintenance at the top of the agenda should be a no-brainer. As the MLA for Concordia and NDP caucus critic for infrastructure, advocating for safer, well-kept streets and highways is one of my top priorities. I will continue advocating for better investments in infrastructure to keep Manitoba moving and create the jobs we need emerging from the pandemic.Let me know which streets and highways across Manitoba you think need to be fixed most. As always, my office can be reached at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

For motorists across our province, roads and highways that get us where we’re going safely and efficiently should be a top priority for the government. After all, smart investments in infrastructure help keep families safe on the road, build our economy through trade, and create good jobs at the same time. 

Unfortunately, Manitobans are once again seeing underspending and mismanagement from the Progressive Conservative government — which continues to put our roads at risk.

Over the last few months, commuters in northeast Winnipeg may have noticed some changes along the north Perimeter. Many access roads along the highway have seen their intersections with the Perimeter cut off, with no new investments in upgraded infrastructure, paved roads, or proper ways to safely and efficiently divert traffic.

Bills defeated but more work to do

Matt Wiebe 5 minute read Preview

Bills defeated but more work to do

Matt Wiebe 5 minute read Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021

Over the past year and a half, Manitobans have faced significant challenges, owing to the COVID-19 pandemic. Here in northeast Winnipeg, I’ve heard from countless families worried about everything from a safe return to school for their kids, to dealing with the financial burdens of the pandemic, and concerns about the worsening addictions crisis.All the while, the Progressive Conservative government made it clear they had no intention of tackling the issues at hand. In fact, the disastrous legislation and privatization agenda it introduced earlier this year would have only made things worse.That’s why our NDP team fought back — and won.This spring, we committed to Manitobans we would fight the government’s reckless legislation tooth and nail by delaying its bills and ensuring folks had a chance to analyze what these new laws could mean for their families. Here in Concordia, I spent the summer meeting with dozens of concerned community members to hear their thoughts about these proposed bills.Every educator, school trustee, or parent at schools in Concordia who I met expressed their concerns about how Bill 64 would slash our education system. Families struggling to make ends meet told me they were worried about skyrocketing Hydro bills, which would have only been made worse by Bill 35. Community members who raised the addictions crisis stressed the need for more addictions programming funding, which would have been jeopardized had Bill 40 passed. These laws — or any other of their dangerous bills — would have been bad news for Manitobans.Fortunately, the work of our NDP team, coupled with the efforts of thousands of concerned Manitobans who fought back, has stopped these bills dead in their tracks.Let’s be clear — while the demise of these bills is a good start, the fight isn’t over yet. Over the past year alone, we still saw $5 million cut from schools, record-long wait times and backlogs at our hospitals, and continued Hydro rate hikes. Meanwhile, every PC MLA stood lockstep with the Pallister government to make this happen.Families in northeast Winnipeg deserve a government who will stand up for healthcare, education, and making life more affordable. The NDP team remains committed to fighting the PCs’ cuts and pushing for a government that puts their priorities first.If you would like to share your thoughts on how we can invest in a better Manitoba, I can be reached at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

Over the past year and a half, Manitobans have faced significant challenges, owing to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Here in northeast Winnipeg, I’ve heard from countless families worried about everything from a safe return to school for their kids, to dealing with the financial burdens of the pandemic, and concerns about the worsening addictions crisis.

All the while, the Progressive Conservative government made it clear they had no intention of tackling the issues at hand. In fact, the disastrous legislation and privatization agenda it introduced earlier this year would have only made things worse.

Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021

Over the past year and a half, Manitobans have faced significant challenges, owing to the COVID-19 pandemic. Here in northeast Winnipeg, I’ve heard from countless families worried about everything from a safe return to school for their kids, to dealing with the financial burdens of the pandemic, and concerns about the worsening addictions crisis.All the while, the Progressive Conservative government made it clear they had no intention of tackling the issues at hand. In fact, the disastrous legislation and privatization agenda it introduced earlier this year would have only made things worse.That’s why our NDP team fought back — and won.This spring, we committed to Manitobans we would fight the government’s reckless legislation tooth and nail by delaying its bills and ensuring folks had a chance to analyze what these new laws could mean for their families. Here in Concordia, I spent the summer meeting with dozens of concerned community members to hear their thoughts about these proposed bills.Every educator, school trustee, or parent at schools in Concordia who I met expressed their concerns about how Bill 64 would slash our education system. Families struggling to make ends meet told me they were worried about skyrocketing Hydro bills, which would have only been made worse by Bill 35. Community members who raised the addictions crisis stressed the need for more addictions programming funding, which would have been jeopardized had Bill 40 passed. These laws — or any other of their dangerous bills — would have been bad news for Manitobans.Fortunately, the work of our NDP team, coupled with the efforts of thousands of concerned Manitobans who fought back, has stopped these bills dead in their tracks.Let’s be clear — while the demise of these bills is a good start, the fight isn’t over yet. Over the past year alone, we still saw $5 million cut from schools, record-long wait times and backlogs at our hospitals, and continued Hydro rate hikes. Meanwhile, every PC MLA stood lockstep with the Pallister government to make this happen.Families in northeast Winnipeg deserve a government who will stand up for healthcare, education, and making life more affordable. The NDP team remains committed to fighting the PCs’ cuts and pushing for a government that puts their priorities first.If you would like to share your thoughts on how we can invest in a better Manitoba, I can be reached at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

Over the past year and a half, Manitobans have faced significant challenges, owing to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Here in northeast Winnipeg, I’ve heard from countless families worried about everything from a safe return to school for their kids, to dealing with the financial burdens of the pandemic, and concerns about the worsening addictions crisis.

All the while, the Progressive Conservative government made it clear they had no intention of tackling the issues at hand. In fact, the disastrous legislation and privatization agenda it introduced earlier this year would have only made things worse.

Vaccinations, reversing cuts are key to recovery

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Preview

Vaccinations, reversing cuts are key to recovery

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021

As Manitoba begins re-opening and as public health restrictions are being eased, we are entering a precarious post-pandemic recovery period in Manitoba.

Throughout the summer I’ve taken the opportunity to begin to meet in-person with folks at the doorstep and in the community to listen to their issues and concerns. No matter where I go or who I speak with in our community, one thing has become abundantly clear — all of us want to see a post-COVID recovery that puts our health care first and makes investments in preventative, front-line services a priority.

For many of us, the steps to a strong recovery have already begun as we prevent the spread of COVID-19 by getting double-vaccinated. Vaccines are the key to our recovery and are safe and effective in preventing further infections of the contagious Delta variant during a potential fourth wave.

Last month, I was honoured to volunteer with Elmwood Community Resource Centre, helping get shots into arms around our neighbourhood at their community vaccine clinics, and have been pleased by pop-up vaccine sites at places like Keenleyside Street or walk-in vaccination appointments at our local pharmacies. If you haven’t received both doses of a COVID-19 vaccine yet, I encourage you to visit www.protectmb.ca or call 1-844-626-8222 to find a clinic nearby and get your shot today.

Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021

As Manitoba begins re-opening and as public health restrictions are being eased, we are entering a precarious post-pandemic recovery period in Manitoba.

Throughout the summer I’ve taken the opportunity to begin to meet in-person with folks at the doorstep and in the community to listen to their issues and concerns. No matter where I go or who I speak with in our community, one thing has become abundantly clear — all of us want to see a post-COVID recovery that puts our health care first and makes investments in preventative, front-line services a priority.

For many of us, the steps to a strong recovery have already begun as we prevent the spread of COVID-19 by getting double-vaccinated. Vaccines are the key to our recovery and are safe and effective in preventing further infections of the contagious Delta variant during a potential fourth wave.

Last month, I was honoured to volunteer with Elmwood Community Resource Centre, helping get shots into arms around our neighbourhood at their community vaccine clinics, and have been pleased by pop-up vaccine sites at places like Keenleyside Street or walk-in vaccination appointments at our local pharmacies. If you haven’t received both doses of a COVID-19 vaccine yet, I encourage you to visit www.protectmb.ca or call 1-844-626-8222 to find a clinic nearby and get your shot today.

Hydro rate hike would weaken our recovery

Matt Wiebe 5 minute read Preview

Hydro rate hike would weaken our recovery

Matt Wiebe 5 minute read Tuesday, Jul. 13, 2021

With summer finally here and public health restrictions slowly being eased, many families across Concordia are starting to look to the future with some optimism as we begin to reopen. However, as we look to kickstart our economy and many of our spending habits return to normal, Manitoba families and small businesses alike will be faced with one particularly nasty surprise to their bottom lines — higher electricity bills.Once again, the Pallister government is raising Hydro rates and giving Manitobans no say over the matter.Recently, we learned that the PC government is planning to raise Hydro rates by 7.5 per cent over the next three years and is once again going around the Public Utilities Board (PUB) to avoid giving Manitobans any input. That means regular Manitobans — the folks who own Manitoba Hydro — won’t be able to even explain how higher electricity bills will impact their families, and we won’t know whether these increases are even required in the first place. What’s more, Manitoba Hydro has stated that the PCs have been planning these increases behind closed doors since last summer, meaning that despite the challenges families are facing during a global pandemic, we will all pay more out of pocket.Unfortunately, the government’s meddling with Hydro is nothing new. Earlier this year, I wrote in The Herald about the government’s plans for Hydro privatization, including that their own documents stated parts of Hydro “should be considered for sale or shutdown.” This would mean higher rates for regular Manitobans. My office received countless phone calls and emails from concerned community members across northeast Winnipeg worried about what that could mean for their families’ budgets, and the importance of keeping Hydro public. Our NDP caucus brought these concerns directly to the government in the legislature, yet the PCs refuse to listen.Families across northeast Winnipeg have been clear — we need to keep Hydro public, ensure our rates stay low, and give Manitobans a say over any rate changes. That’s why our NDP team stands against this government’s forced rate hikes, while opposing dangerous legislation that would weaken the PUB by delaying it in the legislature.A strong economic recovery for Manitoba must mean affordable Hydro rates.If you’d like to share your thoughts about how higher electricity bills will impact your family, don’t hesitate to contact my office at 204-654-1857 or email matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

With summer finally here and public health restrictions slowly being eased, many families across Concordia are starting to look to the future with some optimism as we begin to reopen. 

However, as we look to kickstart our economy and many of our spending habits return to normal, Manitoba families and small businesses alike will be faced with one particularly nasty surprise to their bottom lines — higher electricity bills.

Once again, the Pallister government is raising Hydro rates and giving Manitobans no say over the matter.

Tuesday, Jul. 13, 2021

With summer finally here and public health restrictions slowly being eased, many families across Concordia are starting to look to the future with some optimism as we begin to reopen. However, as we look to kickstart our economy and many of our spending habits return to normal, Manitoba families and small businesses alike will be faced with one particularly nasty surprise to their bottom lines — higher electricity bills.Once again, the Pallister government is raising Hydro rates and giving Manitobans no say over the matter.Recently, we learned that the PC government is planning to raise Hydro rates by 7.5 per cent over the next three years and is once again going around the Public Utilities Board (PUB) to avoid giving Manitobans any input. That means regular Manitobans — the folks who own Manitoba Hydro — won’t be able to even explain how higher electricity bills will impact their families, and we won’t know whether these increases are even required in the first place. What’s more, Manitoba Hydro has stated that the PCs have been planning these increases behind closed doors since last summer, meaning that despite the challenges families are facing during a global pandemic, we will all pay more out of pocket.Unfortunately, the government’s meddling with Hydro is nothing new. Earlier this year, I wrote in The Herald about the government’s plans for Hydro privatization, including that their own documents stated parts of Hydro “should be considered for sale or shutdown.” This would mean higher rates for regular Manitobans. My office received countless phone calls and emails from concerned community members across northeast Winnipeg worried about what that could mean for their families’ budgets, and the importance of keeping Hydro public. Our NDP caucus brought these concerns directly to the government in the legislature, yet the PCs refuse to listen.Families across northeast Winnipeg have been clear — we need to keep Hydro public, ensure our rates stay low, and give Manitobans a say over any rate changes. That’s why our NDP team stands against this government’s forced rate hikes, while opposing dangerous legislation that would weaken the PUB by delaying it in the legislature.A strong economic recovery for Manitoba must mean affordable Hydro rates.If you’d like to share your thoughts about how higher electricity bills will impact your family, don’t hesitate to contact my office at 204-654-1857 or email matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

With summer finally here and public health restrictions slowly being eased, many families across Concordia are starting to look to the future with some optimism as we begin to reopen. 

However, as we look to kickstart our economy and many of our spending habits return to normal, Manitoba families and small businesses alike will be faced with one particularly nasty surprise to their bottom lines — higher electricity bills.

Once again, the Pallister government is raising Hydro rates and giving Manitobans no say over the matter.

Bill 64 threatens schools in northeast Winnipeg

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Preview

Bill 64 threatens schools in northeast Winnipeg

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 16, 2021

For schools across Manitoba, the past 15 months have been incredibly challenging. Teachers are working harder than ever to facilitate virtual learning; parents are home with their kids while they adapt to the online classroom; and students are once again making sacrifices with in-person graduation ceremonies on hold.

It’s clear that teachers are stepping up and doing their best to help students flourish. Yet amidst a global pandemic when educators are already overwhelmed, the PC government is threatening further cuts and a misguided upheaval of our entire province’s school system with Bill 64.

My office in Concordia has been overwhelmed with calls and emails from concerned parents and educators worried about how Bill 64 will hurt our education system. The bill proposes abolishing school divisions throughout Manitoba and centralizing all decision-making power to the PC Minister’s office, leaving the Pallister government’s hand-picked political appointees in full control of our schools.

This means northeast Winnipeg will be left without local voices and representation in our schools, and could lead to the unique programs offered in the River East Transcona and Winnipeg School Divisions, such as Ukrainian, German, and Indigenous language bilingual programs, being cut. Meanwhile, the bill would also push much of the workload currently handled by school divisions onto volunteer-run school community councils, forcing one more commitment onto the plate of busy families.

Wednesday, Jun. 16, 2021

Canstar file photo
Concordia MLA Matt Wiebe urges the public to speak out against the education changes proposed in Bill 64.

PC government cuts support for renters

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

PC government cuts support for renters

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Monday, May. 24, 2021

Just about every family in northeast Winnipeg has faced new financial hardships since the onset of COVID-19. For some, the loss of a job or reduced income has put immense strain on their pocketbook. For others, new expenses such as grocery delivery or curbside pickup fees have meant one additional cost to budget for. And for almost every Manitoban, the PC government’s unprecedented Hydro rate increase has forced our electricity and gas bills to rise even higher. As if that wasn’t enough, the Pallister government now wants renters to bear the brunt, too. Since the pandemic began, my office has heard from dozens across Concordia from East Elmwood to Valley Gardens worried about increases to their rent. It’s no wonder why: last year, every single above guideline rent increase that Manitoba landlords applied for was granted by the Residential Tenancies Branch, with no exceptions.It’s not just these increases making life harder for renters, though. As renters continue struggling to make ends meet, the Pallister government is now forcing them to take an additional $700 hit with their Bill 71.This legislation puts big cheques into the pockets of the most well-off Manitobans while slashing benefits for renters. It will decrease the $700 tax credit that all renters in Manitoba currently recieve to by 25 per cent this year, an immediate loss of $175, while eventually phasing the tax credit out altogether. What’s more, these renters’ landlords will receive cheques in the mail for 10% of their education property taxes on every property they own this year—potentially thousands of dollars.This means that big, out-of-province corporations will be getting cheques for tens of thousands, and the wealthiest Manitobans who own the most property will reap the biggest benefits. Meanwhile, working people who rent here in Concordia will see benefits clawed back. The Pallister government’s reckless Bill 71 is bad news for northeast Winnipeg. Our NDP team has committed to standing up to their bills in the Legislature, while fighting for financial relief for families. We’ll keep pushing the government for a better deal for renters and work to make sure every Manitoban can get their bills paid.If you’d like to share your thoughts on how Bill 71 and slashing renters’ benefits will affect your family, please reach out to my office at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@YourManitoba.ca

Just about every family in northeast Winnipeg has faced new financial hardships since the onset of COVID-19. For some, the loss of a job or reduced income has put immense strain on their pocketbook. For others, new expenses such as grocery delivery or curbside pickup fees have meant one additional cost to budget for. And for almost every Manitoban, the PC government’s unprecedented Hydro rate increase has forced our electricity and gas bills to rise even higher. 

As if that wasn’t enough, the Pallister government now wants renters to bear the brunt, too. 

Since the pandemic began, my office has heard from dozens across Concordia from East Elmwood to Valley Gardens worried about increases to their rent. It’s no wonder why: last year, every single above guideline rent increase that Manitoba landlords applied for was granted by the Residential Tenancies Branch, with no exceptions.

Monday, May. 24, 2021

Just about every family in northeast Winnipeg has faced new financial hardships since the onset of COVID-19. For some, the loss of a job or reduced income has put immense strain on their pocketbook. For others, new expenses such as grocery delivery or curbside pickup fees have meant one additional cost to budget for. And for almost every Manitoban, the PC government’s unprecedented Hydro rate increase has forced our electricity and gas bills to rise even higher. As if that wasn’t enough, the Pallister government now wants renters to bear the brunt, too. Since the pandemic began, my office has heard from dozens across Concordia from East Elmwood to Valley Gardens worried about increases to their rent. It’s no wonder why: last year, every single above guideline rent increase that Manitoba landlords applied for was granted by the Residential Tenancies Branch, with no exceptions.It’s not just these increases making life harder for renters, though. As renters continue struggling to make ends meet, the Pallister government is now forcing them to take an additional $700 hit with their Bill 71.This legislation puts big cheques into the pockets of the most well-off Manitobans while slashing benefits for renters. It will decrease the $700 tax credit that all renters in Manitoba currently recieve to by 25 per cent this year, an immediate loss of $175, while eventually phasing the tax credit out altogether. What’s more, these renters’ landlords will receive cheques in the mail for 10% of their education property taxes on every property they own this year—potentially thousands of dollars.This means that big, out-of-province corporations will be getting cheques for tens of thousands, and the wealthiest Manitobans who own the most property will reap the biggest benefits. Meanwhile, working people who rent here in Concordia will see benefits clawed back. The Pallister government’s reckless Bill 71 is bad news for northeast Winnipeg. Our NDP team has committed to standing up to their bills in the Legislature, while fighting for financial relief for families. We’ll keep pushing the government for a better deal for renters and work to make sure every Manitoban can get their bills paid.If you’d like to share your thoughts on how Bill 71 and slashing renters’ benefits will affect your family, please reach out to my office at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@YourManitoba.ca

Just about every family in northeast Winnipeg has faced new financial hardships since the onset of COVID-19. For some, the loss of a job or reduced income has put immense strain on their pocketbook. For others, new expenses such as grocery delivery or curbside pickup fees have meant one additional cost to budget for. And for almost every Manitoban, the PC government’s unprecedented Hydro rate increase has forced our electricity and gas bills to rise even higher. 

As if that wasn’t enough, the Pallister government now wants renters to bear the brunt, too. 

Since the pandemic began, my office has heard from dozens across Concordia from East Elmwood to Valley Gardens worried about increases to their rent. It’s no wonder why: last year, every single above guideline rent increase that Manitoba landlords applied for was granted by the Residential Tenancies Branch, with no exceptions.

Budget leaves northeast Winnipeg behind

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

Budget leaves northeast Winnipeg behind

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Tuesday, Apr. 20, 2021

On April 7, the Pallister government introduced its first budget since the dawn of COVID-19 one year ago. It seems like everything in our lives has changed since the pandemic began - everything except the PCs’ cuts.Despite the need for additional resources for health care, this year’s budget puts it on the backburner. Operating funding for care at the bedside is once again being cut, while public long-term care homes such as Concordia Place continue to experience funding freezes. Meanwhile, as Manitoba struggles to vaccinate our most vulnerable, doses sit in storage unused with no plan in the budget to ensure shots get into arms sooner.Closer to home, our community is still coping with the loss of the Transcona IV clinic - with no plans in this budget to re-open it - and patients continue to face wait times at Dynacare clinics around Concordia.Whether it’s here in northeast Winnipeg or around Manitoba, PC cuts in the midst of a healthcare crisis are hurting all of us.It’s not just health care that’s seeing cuts and funding freezes. Since 2016, education funding in Manitoba has consistently fallen below the rates of inflation and enrolment growth, and 2021 is no exception. This year, funding for literacy and classroom supports for kids with additional needs is being slashed. Additionally, instead of investing more money on the front lines, the government is instead asking educators to pay for school supplies out of their own salaries. The premier even went so far as to say that forcing teachers to pay for supplies out of their own pocket “doesn’t bother (him) at all.”As families across northeast Winnipeg continue to struggle with the impacts of COVID-19, they deserve to know their government will be there to invest in what matters most - things such as resources for our health-care heroes battling this pandemic on the front lines; funding for long-term care homes to prevent the tragic outbreaks we’ve experienced; and supports for teachers and educators. Now is not the time for cuts, and our NDP team in the legislature will continue standing up for what matters most.If you would like to share your thoughts on how this budget’s cuts to healthcare and education would affect your family, please reach out to my office at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

On April 7, the Pallister government introduced its first budget since the dawn of COVID-19 one year ago. It seems like everything in our lives has changed since the pandemic began - everything except the PCs’ cuts.

Despite the need for additional resources for health care, this year’s budget puts it on the backburner. Operating funding for care at the bedside is once again being cut, while public long-term care homes such as Concordia Place continue to experience funding freezes. Meanwhile, as Manitoba struggles to vaccinate our most vulnerable, doses sit in storage unused with no plan in the budget to ensure shots get into arms sooner.

Closer to home, our community is still coping with the loss of the Transcona IV clinic - with no plans in this budget to re-open it - and patients continue to face wait times at Dynacare clinics around Concordia.

Tuesday, Apr. 20, 2021

On April 7, the Pallister government introduced its first budget since the dawn of COVID-19 one year ago. It seems like everything in our lives has changed since the pandemic began - everything except the PCs’ cuts.Despite the need for additional resources for health care, this year’s budget puts it on the backburner. Operating funding for care at the bedside is once again being cut, while public long-term care homes such as Concordia Place continue to experience funding freezes. Meanwhile, as Manitoba struggles to vaccinate our most vulnerable, doses sit in storage unused with no plan in the budget to ensure shots get into arms sooner.Closer to home, our community is still coping with the loss of the Transcona IV clinic - with no plans in this budget to re-open it - and patients continue to face wait times at Dynacare clinics around Concordia.Whether it’s here in northeast Winnipeg or around Manitoba, PC cuts in the midst of a healthcare crisis are hurting all of us.It’s not just health care that’s seeing cuts and funding freezes. Since 2016, education funding in Manitoba has consistently fallen below the rates of inflation and enrolment growth, and 2021 is no exception. This year, funding for literacy and classroom supports for kids with additional needs is being slashed. Additionally, instead of investing more money on the front lines, the government is instead asking educators to pay for school supplies out of their own salaries. The premier even went so far as to say that forcing teachers to pay for supplies out of their own pocket “doesn’t bother (him) at all.”As families across northeast Winnipeg continue to struggle with the impacts of COVID-19, they deserve to know their government will be there to invest in what matters most - things such as resources for our health-care heroes battling this pandemic on the front lines; funding for long-term care homes to prevent the tragic outbreaks we’ve experienced; and supports for teachers and educators. Now is not the time for cuts, and our NDP team in the legislature will continue standing up for what matters most.If you would like to share your thoughts on how this budget’s cuts to healthcare and education would affect your family, please reach out to my office at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

On April 7, the Pallister government introduced its first budget since the dawn of COVID-19 one year ago. It seems like everything in our lives has changed since the pandemic began - everything except the PCs’ cuts.

Despite the need for additional resources for health care, this year’s budget puts it on the backburner. Operating funding for care at the bedside is once again being cut, while public long-term care homes such as Concordia Place continue to experience funding freezes. Meanwhile, as Manitoba struggles to vaccinate our most vulnerable, doses sit in storage unused with no plan in the budget to ensure shots get into arms sooner.

Closer to home, our community is still coping with the loss of the Transcona IV clinic - with no plans in this budget to re-open it - and patients continue to face wait times at Dynacare clinics around Concordia.

Hydro plan means higher rates, privatization

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

Hydro plan means higher rates, privatization

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Saturday, Mar. 20, 2021

For Manitobans and my constituents, Manitoba Hydro is our crown jewel. Not only does it provide our province with inexpensive and reliable power, clean hydroelectricity also plays a critical part in our role to combat climate change. Making sure we keep Hydro public and affordable should be a top priority for the government.Unfortunately, while Manitobans overwhelmingly want to protect Hydro and keep rates low, the Pallister government has other plans. Since 2016, the PCs have interfered with Hydro by attempting to raise rates by as much as almost eight per cent. Previously, these extreme rate hikes were denied by the Public Utilities Board (PUB), as they would make life unaffordable for Manitobans. However, in order to get around this, the government recently introduced Bill 35 to the Manitoba Legislature — a law that will weaken the PUB by limiting its ability to regulate gas and electricity rates and push the power to set prices directly onto the cabinet table. First this government hurt our community by cutting our ER and CancerCare and now families in northeast Winnipeg could be forced to pay thousands more on their Hydro bills.Meanwhile, we also recently learned that Manitoba Hydro International, a profitable subsidiary of Hydro that provides good jobs and brings in revenue to keep rates down, was forced to close its international consulting business due to political interference — a move that’s now being investigated by Manitoba’s auditor general. This comes at a time when the government’s own documents state that it believes parts of Hydro “should be considered for sale or shutdown,” just as when a PC government privatized MTS in the 1990s.It’s become clear that this government is dead-set on jacking up rates while selling off Hydro piece by piece. Across Concordia, I’ve heard from many families and small businesses concerned about the financial burden this pandemic has forced onto them. Hiking Hydro rates, privatizing public services, and cutting good jobs will only exacerbate the tough economic hurdles so many are facing. That’s why myself and our NDP team have remained committed to fighting the PCs’ troubling action on Hydro. We will stand up in the Legislature to delay government bills that weaken the PUB and open the door to breaking up Hydro, and fight to keep rates low and ensure Hydro stays public.If you’d like to share your thoughts on how higher Hydro rates and privatized services would affect your family, don’t hesitate to contact my office at 204-654-1857 or email matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

For Manitobans and my constituents, Manitoba Hydro is our crown jewel. Not only does it provide our province with inexpensive and reliable power, clean hydroelectricity also plays a critical part in our role to combat climate change. Making sure we keep Hydro public and affordable should be a top priority for the government.

Unfortunately, while Manitobans overwhelmingly want to protect Hydro and keep rates low, the Pallister government has other plans. Since 2016, the PCs have interfered with Hydro by attempting to raise rates by as much as almost eight per cent. 

Previously, these extreme rate hikes were denied by the Public Utilities Board (PUB), as they would make life unaffordable for Manitobans. However, in order to get around this, the government recently introduced Bill 35 to the Manitoba Legislature — a law that will weaken the PUB by limiting its ability to regulate gas and electricity rates and push the power to set prices directly onto the cabinet table. 

Saturday, Mar. 20, 2021

For Manitobans and my constituents, Manitoba Hydro is our crown jewel. Not only does it provide our province with inexpensive and reliable power, clean hydroelectricity also plays a critical part in our role to combat climate change. Making sure we keep Hydro public and affordable should be a top priority for the government.Unfortunately, while Manitobans overwhelmingly want to protect Hydro and keep rates low, the Pallister government has other plans. Since 2016, the PCs have interfered with Hydro by attempting to raise rates by as much as almost eight per cent. Previously, these extreme rate hikes were denied by the Public Utilities Board (PUB), as they would make life unaffordable for Manitobans. However, in order to get around this, the government recently introduced Bill 35 to the Manitoba Legislature — a law that will weaken the PUB by limiting its ability to regulate gas and electricity rates and push the power to set prices directly onto the cabinet table. First this government hurt our community by cutting our ER and CancerCare and now families in northeast Winnipeg could be forced to pay thousands more on their Hydro bills.Meanwhile, we also recently learned that Manitoba Hydro International, a profitable subsidiary of Hydro that provides good jobs and brings in revenue to keep rates down, was forced to close its international consulting business due to political interference — a move that’s now being investigated by Manitoba’s auditor general. This comes at a time when the government’s own documents state that it believes parts of Hydro “should be considered for sale or shutdown,” just as when a PC government privatized MTS in the 1990s.It’s become clear that this government is dead-set on jacking up rates while selling off Hydro piece by piece. Across Concordia, I’ve heard from many families and small businesses concerned about the financial burden this pandemic has forced onto them. Hiking Hydro rates, privatizing public services, and cutting good jobs will only exacerbate the tough economic hurdles so many are facing. That’s why myself and our NDP team have remained committed to fighting the PCs’ troubling action on Hydro. We will stand up in the Legislature to delay government bills that weaken the PUB and open the door to breaking up Hydro, and fight to keep rates low and ensure Hydro stays public.If you’d like to share your thoughts on how higher Hydro rates and privatized services would affect your family, don’t hesitate to contact my office at 204-654-1857 or email matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

For Manitobans and my constituents, Manitoba Hydro is our crown jewel. Not only does it provide our province with inexpensive and reliable power, clean hydroelectricity also plays a critical part in our role to combat climate change. Making sure we keep Hydro public and affordable should be a top priority for the government.

Unfortunately, while Manitobans overwhelmingly want to protect Hydro and keep rates low, the Pallister government has other plans. Since 2016, the PCs have interfered with Hydro by attempting to raise rates by as much as almost eight per cent. 

Previously, these extreme rate hikes were denied by the Public Utilities Board (PUB), as they would make life unaffordable for Manitobans. However, in order to get around this, the government recently introduced Bill 35 to the Manitoba Legislature — a law that will weaken the PUB by limiting its ability to regulate gas and electricity rates and push the power to set prices directly onto the cabinet table. 

Teachers working harder but getting less support

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

Teachers working harder but getting less support

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Friday, Feb. 19, 2021

Making sure our kids get the best education possible should always be a top priority. This has never been more important than this year, as students continue to face unprecedented challenges,owing to COVID-19. As the pandemic continues, teachers and educators continue to work harder than ever to offer both virtual and in-person learning to ensure kids get a good education while staying safe. To every teacher, educator, maintenance worker and school staff member, I want to say thank you for your invaluable and tireless work.This February, schools are once again celebrating I Love to Read month, albeit in a different format. Throughout the month I’ve had the opportunity to join classrooms in virtual settings to share in the love of all things reading and writing. It’s always a pleasure to celebrate literacy by reading some of my favourite books to students, while answering their questions about my work as an MLA. Although the meetings are now virtual, it’s still been a great experience to connect with educators and students across our community. One common theme I’ve heard while joining in virtual readings this month is that teachers continue to work harder than ever to give their students the best education possible, but the provincial government isn’t matching their commitment. We recently learned that, for the fifth year in a row, the PC government’s funding for school divisions has fallen below inflation and enrolment rates. In other words, more cuts to education.We know that now is a time where students and educators need more supports, yet this government continues to ask teachers to do more with less. Meanwhile, the PC government will soon release details of an education review from its high-priced consultants — one that could try to justify disruptive changes and cuts to our education system at a time when educators are already overwhelmed.Our NDP team has continued to call on the government to reverse their cutbacks and invest in what matters most — hiring more teachers, capping class sizes, and investing in mental health supports and technology to help kids learn during this global pandemic. Our kids’ education should always take priority, and the government must act now to make that a reality.If you’d like to share your vision for a better education system, I can be reached at 204-654-1857 or by email at matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

Making sure our kids get the best education possible should always be a top priority. This has never been more important than this year, as students continue to face unprecedented challenges,owing to COVID-19.

 As the pandemic continues, teachers and educators continue to work harder than ever to offer both virtual and in-person learning to ensure kids get a good education while staying safe. To every teacher, educator, maintenance worker and school staff member, I want to say thank you for your invaluable and tireless work.

This February, schools are once again celebrating I Love to Read month, albeit in a different format. Throughout the month I’ve had the opportunity to join classrooms in virtual settings to share in the love of all things reading and writing. 

Friday, Feb. 19, 2021

Making sure our kids get the best education possible should always be a top priority. This has never been more important than this year, as students continue to face unprecedented challenges,owing to COVID-19. As the pandemic continues, teachers and educators continue to work harder than ever to offer both virtual and in-person learning to ensure kids get a good education while staying safe. To every teacher, educator, maintenance worker and school staff member, I want to say thank you for your invaluable and tireless work.This February, schools are once again celebrating I Love to Read month, albeit in a different format. Throughout the month I’ve had the opportunity to join classrooms in virtual settings to share in the love of all things reading and writing. It’s always a pleasure to celebrate literacy by reading some of my favourite books to students, while answering their questions about my work as an MLA. Although the meetings are now virtual, it’s still been a great experience to connect with educators and students across our community. One common theme I’ve heard while joining in virtual readings this month is that teachers continue to work harder than ever to give their students the best education possible, but the provincial government isn’t matching their commitment. We recently learned that, for the fifth year in a row, the PC government’s funding for school divisions has fallen below inflation and enrolment rates. In other words, more cuts to education.We know that now is a time where students and educators need more supports, yet this government continues to ask teachers to do more with less. Meanwhile, the PC government will soon release details of an education review from its high-priced consultants — one that could try to justify disruptive changes and cuts to our education system at a time when educators are already overwhelmed.Our NDP team has continued to call on the government to reverse their cutbacks and invest in what matters most — hiring more teachers, capping class sizes, and investing in mental health supports and technology to help kids learn during this global pandemic. Our kids’ education should always take priority, and the government must act now to make that a reality.If you’d like to share your vision for a better education system, I can be reached at 204-654-1857 or by email at matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

Making sure our kids get the best education possible should always be a top priority. This has never been more important than this year, as students continue to face unprecedented challenges,owing to COVID-19.

 As the pandemic continues, teachers and educators continue to work harder than ever to offer both virtual and in-person learning to ensure kids get a good education while staying safe. To every teacher, educator, maintenance worker and school staff member, I want to say thank you for your invaluable and tireless work.

This February, schools are once again celebrating I Love to Read month, albeit in a different format. Throughout the month I’ve had the opportunity to join classrooms in virtual settings to share in the love of all things reading and writing. 

Fighting for an effective vaccination plan

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

Fighting for an effective vaccination plan

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Friday, Jan. 22, 2021

Over the past 10 months, Manitobans have made immense sacrifices to flatten the COVID-19 curve. It hasn’t always been easy — Christmas dinners and gatherings had to be put on hold, many businesses across northeast Winnipeg have temporarily closed their doors, and social isolation has taken a toll on everyone’s mental health. But now, as COVID-19 vaccines have started being deployed around Manitoba, there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Many of us are looking to the future with hope and an expectation that our government will be there to get us vaccinated as quickly as possible. After all, every Manitoban deserves to know they’ll have access to a COVID-19 vaccine, regardless of where they live or how much money they make.Unfortunately, while other provinces have efficiently pushed vaccinations out the door with ease, we have fallen behind.Manitoba’s vaccine deployment has consistently ranked near the bottom of the pack. In terms of doses administered per capita, we’ve placed almost last when compared to the other provinces. Meanwhile, health-care workers have reported wasted vaccines ending up in the trash, or have received messages sending them to incorrect vaccination sites. Just as the Conservatives failed to prepare for the second wave of the virus this fall, they have now failed to plan for our vaccination campaign.It’s not only the speed at which the vaccine is being deployed that Manitobans are anxious about. Folks from every corner of our province want to ensure it’s deployed equitably too, with the most vulnerable Manitobans getting vaccinated first. I’ve heard from many front-line and essential workers across our community, including health-care aides, teachers and bus drivers, wondering when they will receive the vaccine because of the lack of administration. The government needs to release a complete eligibility list indicating the order in which different priority groups will be eligible to help ease unnecessary confusion, stress and uncertainty and help improve public confidence.  For Manitoba to have a strong recovery in 2021, it’s paramount that we start with a solid foundation. That means making sure our vaccine is distributed effectively, efficiently, and equitably, with no one being left behind. I will keep fighting alongside our NDP Opposition team to make that happen.If you have any thoughts about how Manitoba can improve our vaccine rollout, let me know by reaching out to my office at 204-654-1857 or by email at matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

Over the past 10 months, Manitobans have made immense sacrifices to flatten the COVID-19 curve. 

It hasn’t always been easy — Christmas dinners and gatherings had to be put on hold, many businesses across northeast Winnipeg have temporarily closed their doors, and social isolation has taken a toll on everyone’s mental health. But now, as COVID-19 vaccines have started being deployed around Manitoba, there is a light at the end of the tunnel. 

Many of us are looking to the future with hope and an expectation that our government will be there to get us vaccinated as quickly as possible. After all, every Manitoban deserves to know they’ll have access to a COVID-19 vaccine, regardless of where they live or how much money they make.

Friday, Jan. 22, 2021

Over the past 10 months, Manitobans have made immense sacrifices to flatten the COVID-19 curve. It hasn’t always been easy — Christmas dinners and gatherings had to be put on hold, many businesses across northeast Winnipeg have temporarily closed their doors, and social isolation has taken a toll on everyone’s mental health. But now, as COVID-19 vaccines have started being deployed around Manitoba, there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Many of us are looking to the future with hope and an expectation that our government will be there to get us vaccinated as quickly as possible. After all, every Manitoban deserves to know they’ll have access to a COVID-19 vaccine, regardless of where they live or how much money they make.Unfortunately, while other provinces have efficiently pushed vaccinations out the door with ease, we have fallen behind.Manitoba’s vaccine deployment has consistently ranked near the bottom of the pack. In terms of doses administered per capita, we’ve placed almost last when compared to the other provinces. Meanwhile, health-care workers have reported wasted vaccines ending up in the trash, or have received messages sending them to incorrect vaccination sites. Just as the Conservatives failed to prepare for the second wave of the virus this fall, they have now failed to plan for our vaccination campaign.It’s not only the speed at which the vaccine is being deployed that Manitobans are anxious about. Folks from every corner of our province want to ensure it’s deployed equitably too, with the most vulnerable Manitobans getting vaccinated first. I’ve heard from many front-line and essential workers across our community, including health-care aides, teachers and bus drivers, wondering when they will receive the vaccine because of the lack of administration. The government needs to release a complete eligibility list indicating the order in which different priority groups will be eligible to help ease unnecessary confusion, stress and uncertainty and help improve public confidence.  For Manitoba to have a strong recovery in 2021, it’s paramount that we start with a solid foundation. That means making sure our vaccine is distributed effectively, efficiently, and equitably, with no one being left behind. I will keep fighting alongside our NDP Opposition team to make that happen.If you have any thoughts about how Manitoba can improve our vaccine rollout, let me know by reaching out to my office at 204-654-1857 or by email at matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

Over the past 10 months, Manitobans have made immense sacrifices to flatten the COVID-19 curve. 

It hasn’t always been easy — Christmas dinners and gatherings had to be put on hold, many businesses across northeast Winnipeg have temporarily closed their doors, and social isolation has taken a toll on everyone’s mental health. But now, as COVID-19 vaccines have started being deployed around Manitoba, there is a light at the end of the tunnel. 

Many of us are looking to the future with hope and an expectation that our government will be there to get us vaccinated as quickly as possible. After all, every Manitoban deserves to know they’ll have access to a COVID-19 vaccine, regardless of where they live or how much money they make.

A Christmas like no other

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

A Christmas like no other

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2020

This year, families across our province traded in Christmas dinners, New Year’s Eve parties, and the usual holiday get-togethers for virtual celebrations, nights at home, and gatherings over Zoom or the phone. Banding together to bend the curve and save lives has meant all of us making sacrifices.For Manitoba’s MLAs, things have also been different this year. The holiday season at the Manitoba Legislature began as our busy fall session — much of which was held virtually to encourage social distancing — came to a close. Our NDP team held the government accountable by calling for a recovery that keeps families safe and invests in frontline services. We urged the government to step in to protect seniors in personal care homes hit hardest by the pandemic; we pushed to protect affordability by standing against their planned increase to Hydro rates; we fought to stop their cuts to our healthcare system in the midst of a pandemic; and I personally sponsored a petition to stop the closure of Concordia’s CancerCare clinic.After the legislature officially adjourned for the holidays, we celebrated the season with the Legislative Holiday Show, a virtual celebration held in place of the usual annual Legislative Building public open house. While we weren’t able to celebrate in-person on Broadway this year, Manitobans still enjoyed an incredible event with performances from local artists like William Prince, the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, and even a reading of The Night Before Christmas by MLAs.Many other annual holiday traditions were also put on hold this year. The CP Holiday Train, which normally rolls through our neighbourhood every December, was cancelled due to the pandemic. Instead, I enjoyed the CP Holiday Train at Home online concert, which helped raise over amillion dollars for food banks across Canada. Celebrations such as the Elmwood Community Resource Centre’s annual Breakfast with Santa also took a break in 2020, and I look forward to joining them once again next year.2020 was a year of unprecedented challenges. The commitments and sacrifices made by Manitobans, both during the holidays and throughout the year, are helping save lives and preparing us for a strong recovery in 2021. Our NDP team will continue pushing for a government that matches Manitobans’ commitments and puts people first.If you have any questions, concerns, or feedback to help Manitoba prepare for a strong recovery in 2021, I can be reached at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

This year, families across our province traded in Christmas dinners, New Year’s Eve parties, and the usual holiday get-togethers for virtual celebrations, nights at home, and gatherings over Zoom or the phone. Banding together to bend the curve and save lives has meant all of us making sacrifices.

For Manitoba’s MLAs, things have also been different this year. The holiday season at the Manitoba Legislature began as our busy fall session — much of which was held virtually to encourage social distancing — came to a close. Our NDP team held the government accountable by calling for a recovery that keeps families safe and invests in frontline services. We urged the government to step in to protect seniors in personal care homes hit hardest by the pandemic; we pushed to protect affordability by standing against their planned increase to Hydro rates; we fought to stop their cuts to our healthcare system in the midst of a pandemic; and I personally sponsored a petition to stop the closure of Concordia’s CancerCare clinic.

After the legislature officially adjourned for the holidays, we celebrated the season with the Legislative Holiday Show, a virtual celebration held in place of the usual annual Legislative Building public open house. While we weren’t able to celebrate in-person on Broadway this year, Manitobans still enjoyed an incredible event with performances from local artists like William Prince, the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, and even a reading of The Night Before Christmas by MLAs.

Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2020

This year, families across our province traded in Christmas dinners, New Year’s Eve parties, and the usual holiday get-togethers for virtual celebrations, nights at home, and gatherings over Zoom or the phone. Banding together to bend the curve and save lives has meant all of us making sacrifices.For Manitoba’s MLAs, things have also been different this year. The holiday season at the Manitoba Legislature began as our busy fall session — much of which was held virtually to encourage social distancing — came to a close. Our NDP team held the government accountable by calling for a recovery that keeps families safe and invests in frontline services. We urged the government to step in to protect seniors in personal care homes hit hardest by the pandemic; we pushed to protect affordability by standing against their planned increase to Hydro rates; we fought to stop their cuts to our healthcare system in the midst of a pandemic; and I personally sponsored a petition to stop the closure of Concordia’s CancerCare clinic.After the legislature officially adjourned for the holidays, we celebrated the season with the Legislative Holiday Show, a virtual celebration held in place of the usual annual Legislative Building public open house. While we weren’t able to celebrate in-person on Broadway this year, Manitobans still enjoyed an incredible event with performances from local artists like William Prince, the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, and even a reading of The Night Before Christmas by MLAs.Many other annual holiday traditions were also put on hold this year. The CP Holiday Train, which normally rolls through our neighbourhood every December, was cancelled due to the pandemic. Instead, I enjoyed the CP Holiday Train at Home online concert, which helped raise over amillion dollars for food banks across Canada. Celebrations such as the Elmwood Community Resource Centre’s annual Breakfast with Santa also took a break in 2020, and I look forward to joining them once again next year.2020 was a year of unprecedented challenges. The commitments and sacrifices made by Manitobans, both during the holidays and throughout the year, are helping save lives and preparing us for a strong recovery in 2021. Our NDP team will continue pushing for a government that matches Manitobans’ commitments and puts people first.If you have any questions, concerns, or feedback to help Manitoba prepare for a strong recovery in 2021, I can be reached at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

This year, families across our province traded in Christmas dinners, New Year’s Eve parties, and the usual holiday get-togethers for virtual celebrations, nights at home, and gatherings over Zoom or the phone. Banding together to bend the curve and save lives has meant all of us making sacrifices.

For Manitoba’s MLAs, things have also been different this year. The holiday season at the Manitoba Legislature began as our busy fall session — much of which was held virtually to encourage social distancing — came to a close. Our NDP team held the government accountable by calling for a recovery that keeps families safe and invests in frontline services. We urged the government to step in to protect seniors in personal care homes hit hardest by the pandemic; we pushed to protect affordability by standing against their planned increase to Hydro rates; we fought to stop their cuts to our healthcare system in the midst of a pandemic; and I personally sponsored a petition to stop the closure of Concordia’s CancerCare clinic.

After the legislature officially adjourned for the holidays, we celebrated the season with the Legislative Holiday Show, a virtual celebration held in place of the usual annual Legislative Building public open house. While we weren’t able to celebrate in-person on Broadway this year, Manitobans still enjoyed an incredible event with performances from local artists like William Prince, the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, and even a reading of The Night Before Christmas by MLAs.

Stop the cuts and fix long-term care

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

Stop the cuts and fix long-term care

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Manitoba, one thing has become clear  — a strong, public healthcare system has never been more important.With case counts across our province on the rise, Manitobans deserve to know their government will be there to keep them safe, while preserving access to health care. Unfortunately, that seems to be further from reality than ever before. Whether it’s the CancerCare clinic at Concordia Hospital closing its doors, personal care homes across our community stretched too thin, or mixed messages from Premier Pallister about public health orders, the Province’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic has gotten a failing grade.A few weeks ago, I heard first-hand from concerned members of our community about how the province’s inadequate pandemic plan and cuts to health care have hit close to home. While hosting a virtual town hall to discuss the proposed closure of Concordia Hospital’s CancerCare clinic, a patient told me her story of how much of a “nightmare” battling cancer has been during the pandemic. She said that being forced to Health Sciences Centre on regular basis would put unbelievable strain on her treatment, yet the premier has refused to listen or acknowledge her concerns or those of other patients.These sentiments are nothing new. Between closing our local  emergency room, our community clinics, and now slashing CancerCare, time and time again this government has not listened to the priorities of our neighbourhood when it comes to healthcare.It’s not just our local hospital that’s under attack, either. There have been COVID-19 outbreaks in personal care homes across Manitoba, including at Concordia Place, Bethania, and River East personal care homes. These outbreaks have had heartbreaking consequences, with too many Manitobans losing their loved ones due to the -province’s refusal to act.While this government has stood idly by, our NDP team has demanded they take action. We introduced a motion asking for immediate government intervention at for-profit PCHs; we brought forward a bill that would demand the government to listen to public health experts like Dr. Roussin during health emergencies; and we’ve asked it to stop any further cuts to health care during a pandemic, like the cut to CancerCare at Concordia Hospital.Nothing is more important than your family’s health, and it’s time the government take action to recognize that fact.If you have any thoughts on how we can improve healthcare in Manitoba, reach out to me anytime at 204-654-1857, or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Manitoba, one thing has become clear  — a strong, public healthcare system has never been more important.

With case counts across our province on the rise, Manitobans deserve to know their government will be there to keep them safe, while preserving access to health care. Unfortunately, that seems to be further from reality than ever before. Whether it’s the CancerCare clinic at Concordia Hospital closing its doors, personal care homes across our community stretched too thin, or mixed messages from Premier Pallister about public health orders, the Province’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic has gotten a failing grade.

A few weeks ago, I heard first-hand from concerned members of our community about how the province’s inadequate pandemic plan and cuts to health care have hit close to home. While hosting a virtual town hall to discuss the proposed closure of Concordia Hospital’s CancerCare clinic, a patient told me her story of how much of a “nightmare” battling cancer has been during the pandemic. 

Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Manitoba, one thing has become clear  — a strong, public healthcare system has never been more important.With case counts across our province on the rise, Manitobans deserve to know their government will be there to keep them safe, while preserving access to health care. Unfortunately, that seems to be further from reality than ever before. Whether it’s the CancerCare clinic at Concordia Hospital closing its doors, personal care homes across our community stretched too thin, or mixed messages from Premier Pallister about public health orders, the Province’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic has gotten a failing grade.A few weeks ago, I heard first-hand from concerned members of our community about how the province’s inadequate pandemic plan and cuts to health care have hit close to home. While hosting a virtual town hall to discuss the proposed closure of Concordia Hospital’s CancerCare clinic, a patient told me her story of how much of a “nightmare” battling cancer has been during the pandemic. She said that being forced to Health Sciences Centre on regular basis would put unbelievable strain on her treatment, yet the premier has refused to listen or acknowledge her concerns or those of other patients.These sentiments are nothing new. Between closing our local  emergency room, our community clinics, and now slashing CancerCare, time and time again this government has not listened to the priorities of our neighbourhood when it comes to healthcare.It’s not just our local hospital that’s under attack, either. There have been COVID-19 outbreaks in personal care homes across Manitoba, including at Concordia Place, Bethania, and River East personal care homes. These outbreaks have had heartbreaking consequences, with too many Manitobans losing their loved ones due to the -province’s refusal to act.While this government has stood idly by, our NDP team has demanded they take action. We introduced a motion asking for immediate government intervention at for-profit PCHs; we brought forward a bill that would demand the government to listen to public health experts like Dr. Roussin during health emergencies; and we’ve asked it to stop any further cuts to health care during a pandemic, like the cut to CancerCare at Concordia Hospital.Nothing is more important than your family’s health, and it’s time the government take action to recognize that fact.If you have any thoughts on how we can improve healthcare in Manitoba, reach out to me anytime at 204-654-1857, or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Manitoba, one thing has become clear  — a strong, public healthcare system has never been more important.

With case counts across our province on the rise, Manitobans deserve to know their government will be there to keep them safe, while preserving access to health care. Unfortunately, that seems to be further from reality than ever before. Whether it’s the CancerCare clinic at Concordia Hospital closing its doors, personal care homes across our community stretched too thin, or mixed messages from Premier Pallister about public health orders, the Province’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic has gotten a failing grade.

A few weeks ago, I heard first-hand from concerned members of our community about how the province’s inadequate pandemic plan and cuts to health care have hit close to home. While hosting a virtual town hall to discuss the proposed closure of Concordia Hospital’s CancerCare clinic, a patient told me her story of how much of a “nightmare” battling cancer has been during the pandemic. 

Government to raise Hydro rates

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

Government to raise Hydro rates

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Friday, Oct. 30, 2020

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spike, residents of northeast Winnipeg have a lot on their minds. I’ve heard firsthand from many constituents concerned about their worries for the safety of their children at school, the health of their loved ones in personal care homes and about their many, ongoing concerns about their livelihood and making ends meet. Many are still receiving reduced wages, working fewer hours or have lost their jobs. For many, family budgets are already stretched to the max.Despite this reality, the provincial government recently revealed its plan to raise Manitoba Hydro rates for all Manitobans. The planned increase of almost three per cent will make life more expensive and is set to take effect in December, just before the holiday season and in the middle of a pandemic — a time when people can least afford to pay.The increase comes at the direction of the premier and cabinet and will bypass the usual Public Utilities Board process. Under law, any rate increase should first be approved by the PUB, which acts as a check on the government’s interference. In 2018, for example, the PUB saved Manitobans $60 million when it rejected Hydro’s call for a 7.9 per cent rate increase. This move to circumvent the PUB is a preview of the Pallister government’s upcoming legislation, which will permanently weaken the board’s powers by allowing rates set by cabinet to become the norm. That means our Hydro bills could get more expensive and Manitobans would have no say over an increase.This rate increase comes at a time when Hydro is posting healthy profits. Last year, Hydro profited over $100 million and even projects a $51 million profit this year, during a pandemic. But while Hydro is profitable now, recent government directives are threatening that profitability. Last month, we discovered that Hydro was privatizing its majority stake in Teshmont, a profitable subsidiary of Hydro, and meddling from the government has meant ordering the successful Hydro International to stop seeking new projects.If you have concerns about affordability in Manitoba, please reach out to my office at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spike, residents of northeast Winnipeg have a lot on their minds. 

I’ve heard firsthand from many constituents concerned about their worries for the safety of their children at school, the health of their loved ones in personal care homes and about their many, ongoing concerns about their livelihood and making ends meet. Many are still receiving reduced wages, working fewer hours or have lost their jobs. For many, family budgets are already stretched to the max.

Despite this reality, the provincial government recently revealed its plan to raise Manitoba Hydro rates for all Manitobans. The planned increase of almost three per cent will make life more expensive and is set to take effect in December, just before the holiday season and in the middle of a pandemic — a time when people can least afford to pay.

Friday, Oct. 30, 2020

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spike, residents of northeast Winnipeg have a lot on their minds. I’ve heard firsthand from many constituents concerned about their worries for the safety of their children at school, the health of their loved ones in personal care homes and about their many, ongoing concerns about their livelihood and making ends meet. Many are still receiving reduced wages, working fewer hours or have lost their jobs. For many, family budgets are already stretched to the max.Despite this reality, the provincial government recently revealed its plan to raise Manitoba Hydro rates for all Manitobans. The planned increase of almost three per cent will make life more expensive and is set to take effect in December, just before the holiday season and in the middle of a pandemic — a time when people can least afford to pay.The increase comes at the direction of the premier and cabinet and will bypass the usual Public Utilities Board process. Under law, any rate increase should first be approved by the PUB, which acts as a check on the government’s interference. In 2018, for example, the PUB saved Manitobans $60 million when it rejected Hydro’s call for a 7.9 per cent rate increase. This move to circumvent the PUB is a preview of the Pallister government’s upcoming legislation, which will permanently weaken the board’s powers by allowing rates set by cabinet to become the norm. That means our Hydro bills could get more expensive and Manitobans would have no say over an increase.This rate increase comes at a time when Hydro is posting healthy profits. Last year, Hydro profited over $100 million and even projects a $51 million profit this year, during a pandemic. But while Hydro is profitable now, recent government directives are threatening that profitability. Last month, we discovered that Hydro was privatizing its majority stake in Teshmont, a profitable subsidiary of Hydro, and meddling from the government has meant ordering the successful Hydro International to stop seeking new projects.If you have concerns about affordability in Manitoba, please reach out to my office at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spike, residents of northeast Winnipeg have a lot on their minds. 

I’ve heard firsthand from many constituents concerned about their worries for the safety of their children at school, the health of their loved ones in personal care homes and about their many, ongoing concerns about their livelihood and making ends meet. Many are still receiving reduced wages, working fewer hours or have lost their jobs. For many, family budgets are already stretched to the max.

Despite this reality, the provincial government recently revealed its plan to raise Manitoba Hydro rates for all Manitobans. The planned increase of almost three per cent will make life more expensive and is set to take effect in December, just before the holiday season and in the middle of a pandemic — a time when people can least afford to pay.

CancerCare cuts bad for Concordia

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Preview

CancerCare cuts bad for Concordia

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 5 minute read Friday, Oct. 2, 2020

Every Manitoban deserves access to quality public healthcare, close to home. Whether that’s a family doctor, a hospital emergency room, or lifesaving cancer treatment, our healthcare system needs to be accessible for everyone who needs it.Unfortunately, last month I learned of a major cut that will put accessible treatment in jeopardy for Manitobans battling cancer.In September, the Pallister government revealed plans to cut CancerCare outpatient services at both the Concordia and Seven Oaks hospitals. That would mean hundreds of Manitobans living with cancer would be forced across the city to get the same treatment they can currently access in their neighbourhood. Just like when the government shuttered the Concordia emergency room last year, we’re once again fighting healthcare cuts and closures here in our community — and residents of northeast Winnipeg are paying the price.While the government claims this cut is meant to improve care, its own documents prove otherwise. In a contract bid to high-priced private consultants, the government said that these changes are to simply lower costs and streamline CancerCare’s “fiscal performance.” This means saving a buck at the expense of patients’ well-being.Fortunately, affected community members have not stayed silent. Many CancerCare nurses, worried how this could affect patient care, wrote a letter to Pallister’s Health Minister to stress that “closing down the site in the Concordia community … would most certainly increase the burden for people (they) are trying to help.” They say that current sites are already at capacity, and sites such as Concordia can provide more personalized care. It’s not just healthcare workers who are worried, either. I’ve heard firsthand from many members of our community who are living with cancer about the added stress that travelling across the city — on a daily basis, for many — would have on them and their family.While Pallister tries to ram through more cuts to healthcare during a pandemic, your NDP official Opposition has fought back. My colleagues and I have had the pleasure of meeting with CancerCare staff at to hear some of their concerns, and we are working to stop this cut in its tracks. Putting healthcare at the top of the government’s radar is our number one priority.If you would like to share your story of how cuts to CancerCare would affect you, or have any ideas to improve healthcare in Manitoba, reach out to my office anytime at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

Every Manitoban deserves access to quality public healthcare, close to home. Whether that’s a family doctor, a hospital emergency room, or lifesaving cancer treatment, our healthcare system needs to be accessible for everyone who needs it.

Unfortunately, last month I learned of a major cut that will put accessible treatment in jeopardy for Manitobans battling cancer.

In September, the Pallister government revealed plans to cut CancerCare outpatient services at both the Concordia and Seven Oaks hospitals. That would mean hundreds of Manitobans living with cancer would be forced across the city to get the same treatment they can currently access in their neighbourhood. Just like when the government shuttered the Concordia emergency room last year, we’re once again fighting healthcare cuts and closures here in our community — and residents of northeast Winnipeg are paying the price.

Friday, Oct. 2, 2020

Every Manitoban deserves access to quality public healthcare, close to home. Whether that’s a family doctor, a hospital emergency room, or lifesaving cancer treatment, our healthcare system needs to be accessible for everyone who needs it.Unfortunately, last month I learned of a major cut that will put accessible treatment in jeopardy for Manitobans battling cancer.In September, the Pallister government revealed plans to cut CancerCare outpatient services at both the Concordia and Seven Oaks hospitals. That would mean hundreds of Manitobans living with cancer would be forced across the city to get the same treatment they can currently access in their neighbourhood. Just like when the government shuttered the Concordia emergency room last year, we’re once again fighting healthcare cuts and closures here in our community — and residents of northeast Winnipeg are paying the price.While the government claims this cut is meant to improve care, its own documents prove otherwise. In a contract bid to high-priced private consultants, the government said that these changes are to simply lower costs and streamline CancerCare’s “fiscal performance.” This means saving a buck at the expense of patients’ well-being.Fortunately, affected community members have not stayed silent. Many CancerCare nurses, worried how this could affect patient care, wrote a letter to Pallister’s Health Minister to stress that “closing down the site in the Concordia community … would most certainly increase the burden for people (they) are trying to help.” They say that current sites are already at capacity, and sites such as Concordia can provide more personalized care. It’s not just healthcare workers who are worried, either. I’ve heard firsthand from many members of our community who are living with cancer about the added stress that travelling across the city — on a daily basis, for many — would have on them and their family.While Pallister tries to ram through more cuts to healthcare during a pandemic, your NDP official Opposition has fought back. My colleagues and I have had the pleasure of meeting with CancerCare staff at to hear some of their concerns, and we are working to stop this cut in its tracks. Putting healthcare at the top of the government’s radar is our number one priority.If you would like to share your story of how cuts to CancerCare would affect you, or have any ideas to improve healthcare in Manitoba, reach out to my office anytime at 204-654-1857 or matt.wiebe@yourmanitoba.ca

Every Manitoban deserves access to quality public healthcare, close to home. Whether that’s a family doctor, a hospital emergency room, or lifesaving cancer treatment, our healthcare system needs to be accessible for everyone who needs it.

Unfortunately, last month I learned of a major cut that will put accessible treatment in jeopardy for Manitobans battling cancer.

In September, the Pallister government revealed plans to cut CancerCare outpatient services at both the Concordia and Seven Oaks hospitals. That would mean hundreds of Manitobans living with cancer would be forced across the city to get the same treatment they can currently access in their neighbourhood. Just like when the government shuttered the Concordia emergency room last year, we’re once again fighting healthcare cuts and closures here in our community — and residents of northeast Winnipeg are paying the price.

It’s time to build a safer education system

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Preview

It’s time to build a safer education system

Matt Wiebe - Concordia MLA Constituency Report 4 minute read Friday, Sep. 4, 2020

As summer comes to an end, families across Manitoba are sending their kids back to the classroom, while teachers take on another year of learning.

It seems as if this will be a school year like no other, as parents and educators alike work to make sure kids have a safe place to learn, develop and grow.

Over the past month, I’ve heard from dozens of anxious teachers, educational assistants, and parents from across northeast Winnipeg who know that a return to school this fall is essential, but want to make sure it’s done safely. That means making sure educators have the resources they need in the classroom, students have adequate space to physically distance, and schools have better infrastructure to prevent viral transmission.

Unfortunately, the provincial government has not done nearly enough to make sure that can happen.

Friday, Sep. 4, 2020

As summer comes to an end, families across Manitoba are sending their kids back to the classroom, while teachers take on another year of learning.

It seems as if this will be a school year like no other, as parents and educators alike work to make sure kids have a safe place to learn, develop and grow.

Over the past month, I’ve heard from dozens of anxious teachers, educational assistants, and parents from across northeast Winnipeg who know that a return to school this fall is essential, but want to make sure it’s done safely. That means making sure educators have the resources they need in the classroom, students have adequate space to physically distance, and schools have better infrastructure to prevent viral transmission.

Unfortunately, the provincial government has not done nearly enough to make sure that can happen.

Investments in childcare long overdue

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Preview

Investments in childcare long overdue

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020

As Manitoba enters the fourth phase of restoring services, many families are heading back to work and getting back into a routine. For parents, that means making sure that quality, accessible childcare is there when they need it.

Across Concordia, I’ve heard from parents, early childhood educators and childcare directors who know all too well that more resources are needed for daycares now.

Throughout the pandemic, childcare centres have faced poor communication from the province about how to operate, how many kids they can bring in or what lower capacities could mean for parent fees and daycare funding.   

As a result, many childcare centres that were already underfunded have struggled to provide the support parents need, while worrying about how they’ll be able to maintain physical distancing to keep kids safe. The government has made it clear, even before the pandemic, that they don’t value quality, affordable public childcare.

Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020

As Manitoba enters the fourth phase of restoring services, many families are heading back to work and getting back into a routine. For parents, that means making sure that quality, accessible childcare is there when they need it.

Across Concordia, I’ve heard from parents, early childhood educators and childcare directors who know all too well that more resources are needed for daycares now.

Throughout the pandemic, childcare centres have faced poor communication from the province about how to operate, how many kids they can bring in or what lower capacities could mean for parent fees and daycare funding.   

As a result, many childcare centres that were already underfunded have struggled to provide the support parents need, while worrying about how they’ll be able to maintain physical distancing to keep kids safe. The government has made it clear, even before the pandemic, that they don’t value quality, affordable public childcare.

Government pandemic support falls short

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Preview

Government pandemic support falls short

Matt Wiebe 3 minute read Monday, Jul. 13, 2020

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many Manitobans have faced unprecedented financial challenges.

Whether it’s the 10, 000 public service workers laid off by the Pallister government, small businesses forced to close their doors owing to a lack of provincial rent support, or essential front-line workers in childcare and education being asked to do more with less — struggling Manitobans deserve to know that their government will be there to lend a hand when times are tough.

Unfortunately, the Pallister government has not lived up to that task.

One group that has faced unique challenges over the past few months are charities and not-for-profits, many of which have seen their donations decline and have not received help from the provincial government.

Monday, Jul. 13, 2020

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many Manitobans have faced unprecedented financial challenges.

Whether it’s the 10, 000 public service workers laid off by the Pallister government, small businesses forced to close their doors owing to a lack of provincial rent support, or essential front-line workers in childcare and education being asked to do more with less — struggling Manitobans deserve to know that their government will be there to lend a hand when times are tough.

Unfortunately, the Pallister government has not lived up to that task.

One group that has faced unique challenges over the past few months are charities and not-for-profits, many of which have seen their donations decline and have not received help from the provincial government.

Standing up for students

Matt Wiebe 2 minute read Preview

Standing up for students

Matt Wiebe 2 minute read Monday, Jun. 15, 2020

For schools in Manitoba, this has been a year like no other.

Whether they have been adjusting to online learning, dealing with limited one-on-one teaching opportunities in the classroom, or just coping with the new and unique challenges brought on by COVID-19, things haven’t been easy for students, parents, and educators alike.

Fortunately, schools around Manitoba have stepped up to find new, creative ways of navigating through this new normal. Here in Concordia, many schools have held “teacher parades” to stay connected with their students, while initiatives such as Kent Road School’s hamper program have offered direct support for families. Meanwhile, high school students at Kildonan East Collegiate are commemorating their graduation with celebratory lawn signs dotted around our community and plans for a socially distant convocation. I’m glad I was still able to provide a bursary to deserving high school students as they embark on their post secondary schooling.

Unfortunately, while teachers and educational assistants have been working hard to support their students both from home and in the classroom, we haven’t seen the same level of support from our provincial government. Despite postponing the release of a costly provincial education review for a full year, the premier still asked Manitoba school divisions to brace for a 30 per cent reduction to their budgets, meaning deep cuts and layoffs in our schools. Over 6,000 Manitobans working in school divisions have been laid off since the beginning of this pandemic, and our kids’ education is suffering.

Monday, Jun. 15, 2020

For schools in Manitoba, this has been a year like no other.

Whether they have been adjusting to online learning, dealing with limited one-on-one teaching opportunities in the classroom, or just coping with the new and unique challenges brought on by COVID-19, things haven’t been easy for students, parents, and educators alike.

Fortunately, schools around Manitoba have stepped up to find new, creative ways of navigating through this new normal. Here in Concordia, many schools have held “teacher parades” to stay connected with their students, while initiatives such as Kent Road School’s hamper program have offered direct support for families. Meanwhile, high school students at Kildonan East Collegiate are commemorating their graduation with celebratory lawn signs dotted around our community and plans for a socially distant convocation. I’m glad I was still able to provide a bursary to deserving high school students as they embark on their post secondary schooling.

Unfortunately, while teachers and educational assistants have been working hard to support their students both from home and in the classroom, we haven’t seen the same level of support from our provincial government. Despite postponing the release of a costly provincial education review for a full year, the premier still asked Manitoba school divisions to brace for a 30 per cent reduction to their budgets, meaning deep cuts and layoffs in our schools. Over 6,000 Manitobans working in school divisions have been laid off since the beginning of this pandemic, and our kids’ education is suffering.