Melody Rogan

Melody Rogan

Radisson community correspondent

Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

Recent articles of Melody Rogan

Being proactive about seasonal affective disorder

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Being proactive about seasonal affective disorder

Melody Rogan 3 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2022

If you’re starting to feel those ‘winter blues’ kicking in as the days get shorter and colder, you’re not alone. It’s common to have a bit less energy and an increased desire to go into hibernation mode this time of year.

But sometimes we can experience stronger feelings of depression as we head into fall and winter, and that can indicate something more serious might be going on.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that typically affects people in the fall season and carries on through winter, often improving in the spring and summer months.

Symptoms can include feeling listless and sad, having low energy, sleeping and eating too much, having difficulty concentrating, losing interest in things you enjoy, and having thoughts of death or suicide.

Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2022

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that typically affects people in the fall season and carries on through winter.

Enjoying frog sightings close to home

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Enjoying frog sightings close to home

Melody Rogan 3 minute read Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2022

I’ve loved frogs since childhood. My sister and I would try to find as many as we could when visiting local ponds or the field behind our grandparents’ house (which never disappointed). I don’t know if it was the silly jumping or the cute faces, but frogs always drew me in.

As an adult, my fascination with frogs hasn’t dwindled. So, I was happy to see a group of them hopping around my backyard a couple of weeks ago. With all of the wet weather we’ve had throughout the spring and summer, they’ve been making an appearance more frequently than they have for many years.

I think they’re little boreal chorus frogs, a type of treefrog that only gets to about four centimetres in size. As they jumped along in the grass, I noticed a range of colours, from bright green to grey to brown, and even almost black.

In the spring, their calls are surprisingly loud, and it’s easy to see why they’re referred to as chorus frogs. I find the sound strangely comforting when it drifts in through our open windows at night.

Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2022

Community correspondent Melody Rogan has noticed a number of little tree frogs hanging around this summer.

Native prairie patch thriving in second year

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Native prairie patch thriving in second year

Melody Rogan 2 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 20, 2022

The Winnipeg Wildflower Project’s Transcona site is alive and well, with many colourful blooms and grasses flourishing, including milkweed, big and little bluestem, prairie clover, Canada wild rye, yarrow, coneflowers, asters, and awned wheatgrass.

Last year, volunteers spent time prepping, planting, and watering the 1,500-square-foot site at the Rotary Heritage Park on Plessis Road to get the plants established, all of which are perennial and will provide a native prairie display for years to come.

Nicole Webster, project co-ordinator at Winnipeg Wildflower Project, said that while getting water to the site during drought conditions was the biggest challenge last year, recent consistent rainfall has resulted in some unwanted guests on the site this year.

“We have more weeds than expected coming up through the cardboard layer we had put down last year and we are working hard to get them pulled,” she said.

Wednesday, Jul. 20, 2022

All of the Winnipeg Wildflower Project’s plants are perennial and will provide a native prairie display for years to come.

You can contribute to medical advancement

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You can contribute to medical advancement

Melody Rogan 3 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 8, 2022

If seeing an advertisement for a clinical research study has you conjuring images of gruesome drug side effects and weird experiments, that’s understandable. In movies and TV shows, clinical studies are typically depicted as having less-than-desired outcomes.

But research studies are actually an important tool in better understanding humans and the world around us. In the past, large studies have helped researchers determine the connection between such things as smoking and lung cancer, and obesity and heart disease.

Studies rely on human participants who may or may not benefit directly from participating. Some studies are brief and require little effort from participants, while others are longer-term and more complex. Participation is always voluntary, meaning you can withdraw at any time.

Over the past several months, I’ve participated in a few research studies focused on a chronic condition called fibromyalgia (I was diagnosed with it several years ago), as well as general chronic pain. One study was conducted through the University of the Fraser Valley in British Columbia, one through Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont., and another through a university in Ireland.

Wednesday, Jun. 8, 2022

An athlete does a cardiac stress test in a medical study, monitored by the doctor and nurse.

Celebrate International Museum Day 2022

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Celebrate International Museum Day 2022

Melody Rogan 2 minute read Wednesday, Apr. 27, 2022

If it’s been a while since you last visited a local museum, May might just be the right month to explore the past, immerse yourself in a different world, or learn something new, since International Museum Day falls on May 18.

The International Council of Museums has held International Museum Day since 1977 to highlight the importance museums have as places for education and engagement. This year’s International Museum Day theme is ‘The Power of Museums’, which will focus on how museums can bring about positive change in their communities through achieving sustainability, innovating on digitalization and accessibility, and building community through education.

Museums were a valuable resource during the earlier days of the pandemic, providing a much-needed escape through virtual programming and activities for kids and adults alike.

In honour of this year’s International Museum Day, here’s some information about several museums in Winnipeg you might not be familiar with, but that are definitely worth checking out in May or any time of the year.

Wednesday, Apr. 27, 2022

The Manitoba Electrical Museum is one of the province’s many smaller museums that will be celebrating International Museum Day on May 18.

Putting a charitable spin on gardening

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Putting a charitable spin on gardening

Melody Rogan 3 minute read Wednesday, Mar. 16, 2022

The cold, dark days of winter are slowly giving way to the first inklings of spring. It’s the time of year when gardeners are itching to get their hands in some dirt and sow some seeds.

Many gardeners are going through their seed collections, planning out their gardens, and even starting some seedlings indoors to stretch out the otherwise short growing season we have here in Manitoba.

If you have any extra seeds or seedlings, there are some great local organizations and initiatives that will gladly take them off your hands.

Main Street Project (MSP) has garden spaces that are used to provide a therapeutic activity for individuals by planting flowers, vegetables, and herbs, helping people connect to nature and learn how to grow things they can eat.

Wednesday, Mar. 16, 2022

If you find you have more seeds than you can plant this spring, there are several organizations willing to take them off your hands.

Ditch plastic waste, go for refillable options

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Ditch plastic waste, go for refillable options

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Thursday, Feb. 3, 2022

 

When you look around your bathroom, kitchen, and laundry room, how many products do you see packaged in plastic?We’re encouraged to put plastic packaging into our recycling bins, but a study published by the federal government in 2019 showed that just nine per cent of plastic used in Canada is actually recycled.Luckily, we’ve got a few stores here in Winnipeg that offer refillable options for everyday personal hygiene and household cleaning products. These stores also sell products that are minimally packaged in sustainable materials, including eco-friendly toothbrushes, dental floss, feminine hygiene products, bandages, and pretty much anything else you can think of.While it might seem inconvenient or complicated to go with a refill option, it’s really just about creating new habits. Plus, you’ll have less plastic waste to deal with in the long run, and who doesn’t want that? Many refill products are also priced similarly to pre-packaged natural products.Refill is located at 634 Notre Dame Ave. and stocks a variety of natural bulk/refillable products, including shampoos and conditioners, hand soap, dish soap, cleaning vinegar, and laundry detergent. You can bring your own clean and dry containers to fill up, or use the jars provided by the store (which have a $2 deposit that you get back once you return them).Refill also offers a handy low-emission delivery option, with orders delivered between 5 and 8 p.m. every Wednesday using Peg City Car Co-Op electric or hybrid vehicles. You can leave your empty jars out on delivery day to be picked up, cleaned, and reused.Generation Green is located at 100-433 Main St. and also carries many natural bulk/refillable products, such as face cream, hand soap, all-purpose cleaner, shampoo and conditioner, laundry detergent, and toothpaste. Here, too, you can bring your own clean, dry containers to fill, or purchase containers at the store.Planet Pantry, located in the Johnston Terminal at The Forks,  is another great option, with natural bulk/refillable products such as hand soap, laundry and dish soap, shampoo and conditioner, lotions and even essential oils. Again, you can bring in your own containers or use the available jars (with a $2 deposit).Sadly, Transcona and nearby neighbourhoods don’t appear to have similar stores at the moment but let’s hope that changes soon.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com 

When you look around your bathroom, kitchen, and laundry room, how many products do you see packaged in plastic?

We’re encouraged to put plastic packaging into our recycling bins, but a study published by the federal government in 2019 showed that just nine per cent of plastic used in Canada is actually recycled.

Thursday, Feb. 3, 2022

Photo by Melody Rogan
There’s no doubt plastic packaging is overused in our society. Now there are several ways you can reduce your plastic waste.

Being safe about the air we breathe

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Being safe about the air we breathe

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Monday, Dec. 6, 2021

 

We tend to talk a lot about outdoor air pollution, but when was the last time you thought about the air quality inside your home? Now that the weather has turned and we’re spending more time indoors, getting your home’s air tested for things such as mould, asbestos and volatile organic compounds might be worthwhile.I recently had the air in my home test, as there was evidence of mould in the basement and asbestos floor tiles had been removed from the upper level as part of an ongoing renovation.There are many companies providing air testing services in Winnipeg, and the process will involve either having someone come into your home to do the testing, or getting a take-home kit so you can collect samples to send for testing.My husband and I got a take-home kit and set everything up per the included instructions. The company we used was also kind enough to give us a quick demonstration before we took the kit home.It included a pump, tubing, canisters for capturing the samples and a tripod. We set everything up in the basement and collected the sample for the mould test first, which took just five minutes. Then we moved everything upstairs for the asbestos test, which took 46 minutes.We dropped everything off at the testing company the same day and received results a few days later via email. Luckily, everything came back low/normal.There are a number of different tests you can do, based on what concerns you might have. Some tests provide counts of a variety of fibres and spore, while others are even more specific.We had visible mould in our basement, and we had the flooring tiles tested for asbestos before removing them, so we knew those two things would be worth checking.I should note that the tests can sometimes be pricey — it might be a good idea to discuss with the company which tests will be best for your particular situation. The good news is that if anything concerning is found in your results, most air testing companies can also help with remediation.If you’ve found mould in your home, have had any asbestos products disturbed during renovations, or have ongoing unexplained health symptoms that could be related to poor air quality, simple air testing can likely provide the answers you need.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com 

We tend to talk a lot about outdoor air pollution, but when was the last time you thought about the air quality inside your home? 

Now that the weather has turned and we’re spending more time indoors, getting your home’s air tested for things such as mould, asbestos and volatile organic compounds might be worthwhile.

Monday, Dec. 6, 2021

Dreamstime.com
Home air-quality tests can be conducted by inspectors or by using take-home testing kits.

Warm up without touching the thermostat

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Warm up without touching the thermostat

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Monday, Nov. 8, 2021

With a natural gas rate hike and colder temperatures upon us, we may need to look for some alternative ways to stay warm at home this winter.There are plenty of simple ways to beat the chill that don’t involve cranking the thermostat. One of the easiest is to bundle up in layers of warm clothing.What you choose to wear may depend on whether you’re OK with material that comes from animals. Your best bet for a natural material is wool, which helps to trap warmth, although heavy cotton clothing can work OK too.If you choose wool, try to find products that clearly state that mulesing is not practiced by the company and that the wool is ethically sourced (although there’s plenty of debate on whether there is such a thing).Synthetic products are everywhere and fleece is one of the most popular options. A major drawback for polyester fleece is that it sheds plastic microfibres like crazy (especially in the wash) that can end up in waterways.Keep your head, hands, and feet covered (when it’s practical to do so) if you really want to stay warm.Snuggling under a pile of blankets is another easy way to stay toasty, and you can use the fabric info above to make decisions about how you want to wrap yourself up.Some options for personal heat sources include hot water bottles, cloth bags filled with dried beans that can be heated in the microwave (there are plenty of DIY instructions online for making these), or heating pads and electric blankets.Using a small space heater to heat the room you’re spending the most time in can help cut back on the need to heat your entire home as frequently. Opening curtains during the day to let the sun in is a great way to heat up your home as well. Interestingly, keeping the humidity levels up in your home can also help to warm the air.To get the most out of the natural gas heating you do use, be sure to seal any areas around windows and doors that could have leaks/drafts. You might also want to get a programmable thermostat that allows you to automatically turn down the heat when you’re not home.If all else fails, warm up with a workout or cozy up to a beloved pet or family member!Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

With a natural gas rate hike and colder temperatures upon us, we may need to look for some alternative ways to stay warm at home this winter.

There are plenty of simple ways to beat the chill that don’t involve cranking the thermostat. One of the easiest is to bundle up in layers of warm clothing.

What you choose to wear may depend on whether you’re OK with material that comes from animals. Your best bet for a natural material is wool, which helps to trap warmth, although heavy cotton clothing can work OK too.

Monday, Nov. 8, 2021

Dreamstime.com
With temperatures dropping and energy prices rising, reaching for a warm sweater (or two) may be better than turning up the thermostat.

There’s still time for tree planting

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There’s still time for tree planting

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Monday, Oct. 11, 2021

With fiery reds, oranges and yellows decorating the city now that the cooler weather has arrived, it’s hard to ignore our lovely urban forest.In recent weeks, trees have been on my mind quite a bit. I ventured out to The Forks one weekend to pick up some free trees that were being offered through a partnership between the Manitoba 150 Host Committee, Telpay and Trees Canada as part of the Million Tree Challenge.They had 10,000 trees and shrubs to give out, including white spruce, willow, dogwood and poplar. The idea is that through multiple tree giveaway events, residents can access free trees to plant in their yards, adding to Winnipeg’s urban tree canopy.Initiatives like these are important, since the city’s tree canopy has been facing significant challenges, including pests such as the emerald ash borer and diseases such as Dutch elm, along with extreme heat and lack of water in the summer and less snowfall in the winter.The city loses thousands of trees each year, and is set to potentially lose around two-thirds of its overall urban tree canopy in the future.In addition to the Manitoba 150-related tree giveaways, Trees Winnipeg offers a unique program called ReLeaf, through which residents and business owners can purchase low-cost tree packages that include trees, mulch, trunk guards and valuable tree planting info.A variety of trees are available each time the program is offered in the spring and fall, including lilac, cherry, maple, birch, hackberry, bur oak, linden, willow, mugo pine and cedar.If you’re interested in planting trees in your yard, you should know that autumn is a great time to do so.As long as there is no immediate risk of frost and the ground is still soft enough to dig a hole, trees can be planted well into the fall, and this is sometimes preferable to planting in summer because you don’t have to worry about the tree being stressed from hot temperatures and not enough water.By including a tree or two in your yard, you’ll be helping to increase Winnipeg’s important tree canopy, provide habitat and food sources for birds and other creatures, and have something pretty to look at when you gaze out your window or spend time outside.You can learn more about tree programs available to Winnipeggers by visiting www.manitoba150.com/en/programs/trees-150/#top and www.releaf-with-trees-winnipeg.myshopify.com/Trees Winnipeg also offers some great tree planting tips at www.treeswinnipeg.org/tree-care-101/tree-selection-planting.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

With fiery reds, oranges and yellows decorating the city now that the cooler weather has arrived, it’s hard to ignore our lovely urban forest.

In recent weeks, trees have been on my mind quite a bit. I ventured out to The Forks one weekend to pick up some free trees that were being offered through a partnership between the Manitoba 150 Host Committee, Telpay and Trees Canada as part of the Million Tree Challenge.

They had 10,000 trees and shrubs to give out, including white spruce, willow, dogwood and poplar. The idea is that through multiple tree giveaway events, residents can access free trees to plant in their yards, adding to Winnipeg’s urban tree canopy.

Monday, Oct. 11, 2021

Photo by Melody Rogan
Correspondent Melody Rogan picked up this spruce sapling at The Forks recently as part of the Million Tree Challenge.

Taking time to be grateful

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Preview

Taking time to be grateful

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Friday, Sep. 10, 2021

It’s not uncommon for people (including myself) to sometimes lose sight of the many things for which we should be grateful, particularly when we find ourselves preoccupied with things that upset us.World Gratitude Day, observed every Sept. 21, could be the perfect starting point this year for building better habits around being thankful.When dealing with health crises, work stresses, relationship problems, and other personal issues, it can be easy for some of us to fall into a downward spiral, focusing on all of the things that are wrong in our lives and letting them overshadow the good parts.If we look closely enough, we should all be able to recognize some positive aspects of our lives, even in the midst of difficult times. Maybe it’s a loved one who can make you laugh, or a favourite song that calms you down or a hobby that can take your mind off what’s bothering you.It could be as simple as acknowledging how lucky you are that you have a roof over your head, food in your belly, clothing to wear and a comfortable place to sleep at night.Gratitude doesn’t come easily to everyone but it’s worth the work. Plenty of studies have shown that being grateful can boost your mood and reduce stress, improve your self-esteem, help you sleep better, and strengthen your immune system.Some easy ways to express or find gratitude include thanking people for being part of your life, reflecting frequently on positive things in your life or journalling about them, meditating with a focus on something positive within or around you, and looking for opportunities to bring positivity into your life.If you find yourself struggling to see anything good and can’t stop focusing on negative things, it might be worth considering reaching out to a mental health professional. Getting an outside perspective can be a great way to realize how many good things you really have going on in your life.Cognitive behavioural therapy is a good tool for dealing with ongoing negative self-talk and catastrophic thinking patterns, as it can help break unhelpful cycles and put you on the path to feeling more positive and grateful each day.There are many local mental health professionals who offer CBT, and plenty of online self-help resources based on CBT, some of which are low-cost or free.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

It’s not uncommon for people (including myself) to sometimes lose sight of the many things for which we should be grateful, particularly when we find ourselves preoccupied with things that upset us.

World Gratitude Day, observed every Sept. 21, could be the perfect starting point this year for building better habits around being thankful.

When dealing with health crises, work stresses, relationship problems, and other personal issues, it can be easy for some of us to fall into a downward spiral, focusing on all of the things that are wrong in our lives and letting them overshadow the good parts.

Friday, Sep. 10, 2021

Photo by Melody Rogan
World Gratitude Day is observed on Sept. 21 each year. (Coincidentally, it falls this year on the day after the Canadian federal election.)

Transcona baker’s delicious treats are a hit

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Transcona baker’s delicious treats are a hit

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Thursday, Aug. 19, 2021

They’re sweet and chewy, and come in a rainbow of colours - who can resist a tasty macaron?Luckily, you can get your sugar fix right here in Transcona thanks to Bethaney Fletcher, owner of Macs By Beth. Aside from the adorable macarons on offer, which come in flavours such as salted caramel, strawberries and cream, and pistachio, the Macs By Beth menu also includes cookie sandwiches, cakes, and most recently, gourmet stuffed cookies that have been a huge hit so far.Beth started Macs By Beth back in 2019, but said owning a baking business wasn’t something that had always been on her radar.“I had never planned to start my own business and bake professionally,” she said. “However, after successfully figuring out the macaron method and having numerous people request my macs, I decided why not turn something I love to do into a little business, which has brought me to where I am today.”Although she’s only been baking professionally for two years, Beth has had plenty of experience in the kitchen.“I’m a self-taught baker and learned to bake by helping my mom and older sister in the kitchen,” she said. “Then I went on to teaching myself after watching countless online videos and tutorials. Baking has always been something I have been passionate about.”Beth is so passionate about it, in fact, that she recently left her job as a server so that she could focus on her business. She runs Macs By Beth on her own for the most part, but said her older sister will often help out in the kitchen when needed.“I could not have done this without the continued support from my amazing family, friends, and customers,” she said. “Right now, I’m super happy with where my business is at. If it continues to grow the way it currently is, I would love to be able to have my own little storefront someday.”The majority of Beth’s customers live in the Transcona area, and she said the ongoing support of the community is something she truly appreciates.You can find Macs By Beth products online at www.macsbybeth.square.site, or by following the company on Facebook and Instagram (@macsbybeth), where you can stay up-to-date on the latest news, including an exciting upcoming collaboration with another well-known local business. Stay tuned.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

They’re sweet and chewy, and come in a rainbow of colours - who can resist a tasty macaron?

Luckily, you can get your sugar fix right here in Transcona thanks to Bethaney Fletcher, owner of Macs By Beth. 

Aside from the adorable macarons on offer, which come in flavours such as salted caramel, strawberries and cream, and pistachio, the Macs By Beth menu also includes cookie sandwiches, cakes, and most recently, gourmet stuffed cookies that have been a huge hit so far.

Thursday, Aug. 19, 2021

Supplied photo
Bethaney Fletcher has left her job as a server to focus full-time on her macaron business, Macs by Beth.

Friend or foe? Learn to ID common garden pests

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Friend or foe? Learn to ID common garden pests

Melody Rogan 3 minute read Thursday, Aug. 5, 2021

If you’ve ever lovingly tended plants in your yard or on your balcony and then one day discovered a creature or two (or hundreds) have taken up residence and helped themselves to your greenery, you’re not alone.

Based on the number of pest-related questions posted each day in local gardening social media groups, it’s clear that whether you’re a gardening newbie or someone with the ultimate green thumb, you’re bound to encounter some unwanted guests in your garden at some point. Especially of the small, creepy crawly, sometimes-hard-to-find variety.

In my garden, there are a few pests that make themselves at home every summer.

Flea beetles tend to hang out in large numbers and are responsible for the many, many small holes you might find in the first couple of leaves that sprout when a plant emerges from the soil. They are tiny, shiny black beetles that jump (like a flea) when you get too close.

Thursday, Aug. 5, 2021

Dreamstime.com
Garden pests can wreak havoc upon your greenery but there are plenty of resources available for you to learn how to identify and combat them.

A lot to think about on World Social Media Day

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A lot to think about on World Social Media Day

Melody Rogan 3 minute read Tuesday, Jun. 22, 2021

Billions of people around the globe use some form of social media each day. Are you one of them?

By transforming the way we connect and communicate with one another, social media has had an undeniable impact on our lives. That’s why Mashable, a global, multi-platform media and entertainment company, declared June 30 World Social Media Day back in 2010.The company launched the day “to recognize social media’s impact on global communication and to bring the world together to celebrate it.”

The COVID-19 pandemic which first hit the world hard last year highlighted the important role social media plays in connecting people - whether they’re neighbours living next door or family members separated by vast oceans.

Throughout the pandemic, social media allowed us to connect to loved ones quickly and simply, sharing good news and bad, laughing and crying, and cheering each other up with silly memes or highlighting important information that affected our lives.

Tuesday, Jun. 22, 2021

Photo by Melody Rogan
Once intended as a time for celebration, World Social Media Day should perhaps be a day of reflection.

Transcona home to Winnipeg Wildflower Project site

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Transcona home to Winnipeg Wildflower Project site

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Wednesday, May. 26, 2021

Transcona is one step closer to enjoying a new slice of native tallgrass prairie.On May 8, a group of volunteers prepped a 1,500-sq.-ft. site at the Rotary Heritage Park on Plessis Avenue, which will be home to the Winnipeg Wildflower Project’s newest undertaking. The organization aims to establish native wildflower and grass stands in public spaces around the city.Nicole Webster, project co-ordinator, said the location of the Transcona project was selected for a variety of reasons.“With this site being along the Transcona Trail and in a city park,” she said, “it allows for a lot of passersby to stumble upon it, learn about the organization, and interact with native plants. The site also gets lots of sun and is pretty accessible for us to plant and maintain it.”The organization selected the site and got approval from the city late last year, and earlier this year received the support of Transcona city councillor Shawn Nason, who helped the project get funding through the land dedication reserve fund. A grant from TD Park People is also being used.Now that the site has been covered in layers of cardboard, soil, flax straw, and mulch (to prevent non-native grass and weeds), the next step will be planting using a design created by University of Victoria student Justin Duncan. For each project, the organization partners with Prairie Originals, which will supply 21 different native Manitoba wildflower and grass species.Milkweeds, big and little bluestem, prairie clovers, Canada wild rye, yarrow, coneflowers, asters, and awned wheatgrass are just a few of the species that will be included. All of the plants do well in full sun and are drought-tolerant. Once they bloom, they will attract and provide food and shelter for a variety of pollinators and wildlife.Planting will likely take place in early June, and then there will be weekly watering, as well as weeding and seed collecting. Volunteers are always needed, so contact winnipegwildflowers@gmail.com or visit winnipegwildflowerproject.ca if you’re interested in helping out.If you want to stay updated on the project, you can follow the organization on Instagram (@wpgwildflowerproject), Facebook (Winnipeg Wildflower Project), or Twitter (@wpgwildflowers).“We hope these plots will inspire people in Transcona to grow native plants in their own gardens or yards,” Webster said. “And that they enjoy the beautiful blooms when they’re out and about on the trail!” Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

Transcona is one step closer to enjoying a new slice of native tallgrass prairie.

On May 8, a group of volunteers prepped a 1,500-sq.-ft. site at the Rotary Heritage Park on Plessis Avenue, which will be home to the Winnipeg Wildflower Project’s newest undertaking. The organization aims to establish native wildflower and grass stands in public spaces around the city.

Nicole Webster, project co-ordinator, said the location of the Transcona project was selected for a variety of reasons.

Wednesday, May. 26, 2021

Supplied photo
This small group of volunteers helped prepare the site of the Winnipeg Wildflower Projects newest home, in Rotary Heritage Park on Plessis Avenue.

Considering ethical tea production, consumption

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Considering ethical tea production, consumption

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Monday, Apr. 26, 2021

When I was growing up, black tea was something family members drank daily, typically orange pekoe or Earl Grey. I was even allowed to drink some myself as a kid at family get-togethers and special occasions. It was always served hot, with milk and some sugar or honey.As I got older, I learned more about the seemingly endless tea options and I still love to try new teas - although there’s always something comforting about the old standbys from my childhood.Tea (as in black, green, or white tea from the Camellia sinesis plant) is the second-most consumed beverage in the world (water being first). Consumption here in Canada has been steadily increasing, with the Tea & Herbal Association of Canada pointing to rising tea consumption among millennials as a driving force behind the trend.When we brew up a cup at home or sip some at a restaurant, we might not always think about where it comes from or who was involved in getting it to us. But it’s an important commodity - one that millions of families in developing countries rely on for their livelihoods.That’s why the United Nations officially designated May 21 as International Tea Day last year, to “promote and foster collective actions to implement activities in favour of the sustainable production and consumption of tea and raise awareness of its importance in fighting hunger and poverty.”According to the UN, tea production and processing also contributes to the empowerment of women and sustainable land use.The industry is highly sensitive to climate change, since tea only grows well in specific conditions and therefore in a limited number of countries, such as India, Kenya, China, Korea, Japan, Nepal, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Uganda, and Malaysia.Interestingly, small tea farming operations account for about 60 per cent of the world’s tea production, and globally, the industry amounts to over $16.6 billion US. It’s not hard to see why a sustainable and fair industry is important.One thing you can do to ensure the tea you’re purchasing has been grown and processed ethically is look for products that are Rainforest Alliance Certified (tea that has been grown in a sustainable way) and/or Fair Trade Certified (tea workers are paid a fair wage). If you want to learn more, World Vision offers a list of ethically produced teas on its website (https://www.worldvision.ca/no-child-for-sale/resources/fair-trade-tea-guide).Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

When I was growing up, black tea was something family members drank daily, typically orange pekoe or Earl Grey. I was even allowed to drink some myself as a kid at family get-togethers and special occasions. It was always served hot, with milk and some sugar or honey.

As I got older, I learned more about the seemingly endless tea options and I still love to try new teas - although there’s always something comforting about the old standbys from my childhood.

Tea (as in black, green, or white tea from the Camellia sinesis plant) is the second-most consumed beverage in the world (water being first). Consumption here in Canada has been steadily increasing, with the Tea & Herbal Association of Canada pointing to rising tea consumption among millennials as a driving force behind the trend.

Monday, Apr. 26, 2021

Photo by Melody Rogan
The United Nations has declared May 21 as International Tea Day.

All in the family at Sumka Brothers Greenhouses

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Preview

All in the family at Sumka Brothers Greenhouses

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Tuesday, Mar. 30, 2021

 

Generations of gardeners have flocked to Sumka Brothers Greenhouses in Transcona each year, and generations of the Sumka family have helped them create amazing gardens.When George Sumka and his brother Paul started the business in 1977, the family sold vegetable seedlings and flowers at the Nairn Avenue markets. After another Sumka brother, Peter, joined the team, the business became a pop-up shop selling bedding plants in various places around Transcona.Fast-forward to the early 1990s, and the business moved to the location it’s still in today at 328 Peguis St.. at the corner of Peguis Street and Transcona Boulevard. Over the years and at the various locations, five generations of the Sumka family have helped with the business. Today, three generations work together to run the garden centre.The family is currently busy preparing for the greenhouses to open in the last week of April, and Maryann Sumka, George’s daughter, said the business will also be offering online ordering and curbside pickup in the first few weeks of May (weather and product dependant).“This time of year is crazy in the growing houses,” she said. “It’s the culmination of over a year of planning, ordering, organizing, and anticipating to deliver perfect plants at the perfect time to our eager customers.”She noted that 90 per cent of plants purchased in the garden centre are painstakingly homegrown, started by the family from a tiny seed or an unrooted leaf cutting months before the doors open.For the 2021 season, the garden centre will be offering some new edible container gardening options, such as hanging pepper baskets and beet boxes, as well as new varieties of herbs, vegetables, and flowers. They’ll also be expanding their selection of plants that attract pollinators.Like last year, the garden centre will be set up and operating with customer safety in mind, as per pandemic regulations. Thanks to the hard work and dedication of the garden centre’s staff, and the support of the community, the greenhouse was able to supply local gardeners with a welcome distraction from the global health crisis in 2020, and will do so again this year.“We have always been blessed with an extraordinary fan base of loyal customers,” said Maryann. “We take enormous pride in our work and in the top-quality plants we sell.”Keep an eye on sumkabrothers.com for online ordering options and plant offerings for the 2021 season.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com 

Generations of gardeners have flocked to Sumka Brothers Greenhouses in Transcona each year, and generations of the Sumka family have helped them create amazing gardens.

When George Sumka and his brother Paul started the business in 1977, the family sold vegetable seedlings and flowers at the Nairn Avenue markets. After another Sumka brother, Peter, joined the team, the business became a pop-up shop selling bedding plants in various places around Transcona.

Tuesday, Mar. 30, 2021

Supplied photo
Peter Sumka Jr. shows Remi, the youngest Sumka, around the family greenhouse business.

Celebrating forests near and far

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Preview

Celebrating forests near and far

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Friday, Mar. 5, 2021

In honour of World Wildlife Day, which was March 3 and its Forests and Livelihoods theme this year, I thought it would be interesting to take a look at the forest ecosystems we have here in Manitoba.Besides the scattered pockets of small broadleaf forests found here, Manitoba is also home to the boreal (or northern coniferous) forest, which covers more than three-quarters of the province. The area is larger than countries like Spain, Japan, or Sweden, as well as each U.S. state, aside from Texas and Alaska.Our province’s section of the boreal forest is part of the larger Canadian Boreal region, which is the largest intact forest ecosystem on Earth at 1.2 billion acres (485,000 hectares). It’s also worth noting that Manitoba is the only Canadian province or territory that has four of the nation’s major boreal ecozones (Boreal Plains, Boreal Shield, Hudson Plains, and Taiga Shield).Trees in the boreal forest usually include black spruce, which is most prevalent in lowland bogs and fens, as well as jack pine, white spruce, and poplar, which are found in upland areas. Other boreal features include muskeg (sphagnum moss), peat bogs, rivers, lakes, and wetlands.The boreal forest is an incredibly important space for many species, including boreal woodland caribou, wood buffalo, elk, moose, grizzly and black bears, wolves, beavers, snowshoe hares, Canada lynx, red squirrels, lemmings, voles, and an impressive number of birds. Polar bears also have a less-well-known connection to the boreal forest, as each year hundreds of polar bear sows give birth to their cubs where the boreal forest and tundra meet.Many of these species are considered threatened or at risk, owing to things such as climate change and habitat destruction.And that brings us to the role humans play in the boreal forest. We use this area for logging, mining, hydro electricity and tourism, all of which can have a negative impact on the forest. Laws and other measures are in place that aim to protect the boreal forest and control its use, but we have to remain vigilant to ensure there’s an appropriate balance between resource extraction, recreational enjoyment, and conservation.To learn more about human interactions with forests worldwide, visit www.wildlifeday.org and check out manitobawildlands.org for more information about Manitoba’s boreal forest and the creatures that call it home.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

In honour of World Wildlife Day, which was March 3 and its Forests and Livelihoods theme this year, I thought it would be interesting to take a look at the forest ecosystems we have here in Manitoba.

Besides the scattered pockets of small broadleaf forests found here, Manitoba is also home to the boreal (or northern coniferous) forest, which covers more than three-quarters of the province. The area is larger than countries like Spain, Japan, or Sweden, as well as each U.S. state, aside from Texas and Alaska.

Our province’s section of the boreal forest is part of the larger Canadian Boreal region, which is the largest intact forest ecosystem on Earth at 1.2 billion acres (485,000 hectares). It’s also worth noting that Manitoba is the only Canadian province or territory that has four of the nation’s major boreal ecozones (Boreal Plains, Boreal Shield, Hudson Plains, and Taiga Shield).

Friday, Mar. 5, 2021

Photo by Melody Rogan
Manitoba is the only Canadian province or territory with four of the nation’s major boreal ecozones - boreal plains, boreal shield, Hudson plains, and taiga shield.

Searching for sustainable toilet paper

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Preview

Searching for sustainable toilet paper

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Friday, Feb. 5, 2021

 

Since it’s something you use every day, you’ve probably developed some toilet paper preferences. Two- or three-ply? Recycled or standard? Regular texture or extra plush?The subject of toilet paper came up recently. Apparently, the recycled, unbleached eco-friendly stuff isn’t cutting it in the texture and durability departments. It sounds like it’s time to look at other options.There are a few types and brands to choose from at the typical grocery stores, but there are some limitations on what kinds of eco-friendly toilet paper you can find locally.Finding something that’s truly eco-friendly and safe for you and your family can be tricky. While recycled toilet paper is generally a better choice for the environment, it can also sometimes contain stuff that you might not want near your delicate bits.Post-consumer recycled paper can sometimes contain bisphenol A (BPA), which is considered an endocrine disruptor (i.e., it messes with your hormones), and this can end up in toilet paper made from recycled paper.It’s hard to say what amount of BPA might be present nor what impact it would have from such brief contact with your skin, but it’s still not ideal.Toilet paper made with virgin wood pulp is hard on the environment and is not great when it comes to sustainability, though some companies claim to use more responsible forest management in the production of their products.Most toilet paper has been treated with bleach and sometimes other chemicals to make it bright white, and some people find it causes irritation.Who knew there was so much to think about when it comes to something as simple as toilet paper?If you’re able to find it, bamboo-based toilet paper is said to be a better option than traditional wood pulp varieties, and there are other options made with things such as sugarcane, wheat straw, or hemp. Unfortunately, some of these options can be a bit pricier than standard toilet paper. You could also opt for a bidet, which many will point out gets you cleaner than toilet paper. Plus, it seems fancy. There are inexpensive and easy-to-install options available that connect to your existing toilet (and even some that connect to your sink for warm water), and water use is often minimal.Definitely something to think about.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com 

Since it’s something you use every day, you’ve probably developed some toilet paper preferences. Two- or three-ply? Recycled or standard? Regular texture or extra plush?

The subject of toilet paper came up recently. Apparently, the recycled, unbleached eco-friendly stuff isn’t cutting it in the texture and durability departments. It sounds like it’s time to look at other options.

Friday, Feb. 5, 2021

Melody Rogan
There's a lot to consider when buying toilet paper. And then there's the under/over question...

Enjoy nature for what it is

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Preview

Enjoy nature for what it is

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2020

One of my favourite things is exploring the great outdoors, particularly if I manage to do so without encountering other humans.There’s something humbling and deeply satisfying about experiencing nature as it should be — hearing what it actually sounds like without people shouting, playing music, or revving engines, and seeing what it actually looks like when humans haven’t marred it with buildings, garbage and concrete.I go to parks, trails, and other natural areas to connect with flora and fauna. I want to hear birds and squirrels, I want to smell wildflowers and dirt, and I want to see everything life outside of our built environment has to offer.I recognize the value in these places, and I know I’m not the only one.Sadly, the marked increase in visitors to parks and trails this year due to the pandemic has  highlighted a big problem. Many people either don’t understand what it means to respectfully enjoy these spaces, or they simply don’t care.Crowds of people clogged trails and descended upon parks. They let their pets run rampant, left their litter behind, and showcased humans’ inability to just leave things as they are.The most recent example is a trail in Birds Hill Park, where visitors have been hanging decorations in trees the entire length of the trail. Some have been glass, which have ended up smashed on the ground, posing a danger to people and animals.The bottom line is this — nature doesn’t need us to improve it with glitter and plastic that will never biodegrade, and what these individuals are doing is essentially littering. Decorate your own homes however you want. Leave Mother Nature to decorate the natural areas you visit. It’s really that simple.Maybe what we need is more public education on the principles of ‘Leave No Trace’. Things like staying on designated trails, packing out what you bring in (including garbage), leaving what you find, respecting wildlife, and being considerate of other visitors.If you can’t visit natural areas without causing some sort of harm or leaving your mark just for fun, you clearly don’t appreciate what’s actually on offer, and perhaps you don’t have any business being there in the first place.The world really doesn’t need another Instagram photo — it needs humans to protect the limited natural spaces we have left and to use those spaces responsibly. Please visit www.leavenotrace.ca/principles Let’s educate ourselves and do better.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

One of my favourite things is exploring the great outdoors, particularly if I manage to do so without encountering other humans.

There’s something humbling and deeply satisfying about experiencing nature as it should be — hearing what it actually sounds like without people shouting, playing music, or revving engines, and seeing what it actually looks like when humans haven’t marred it with buildings, garbage and concrete.

I go to parks, trails, and other natural areas to connect with flora and fauna. I want to hear birds and squirrels, I want to smell wildflowers and dirt, and I want to see everything life outside of our built environment has to offer.

Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2020

Photo by Melody Rogan
It’s marvelous that people have been enjoying the great outdoors but it’s clear that many need to learn the principles of ‘leave no trace’ when they explore nature.

Mmm, mmm… olfactory memories

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Preview

Mmm, mmm… olfactory memories

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Friday, Dec. 4, 2020

As we near the holiday season and it remains unclear whether we’ll get to spend time with people who live outside of our homes, it will be important to find comfort and reasons to celebrate despite being apart.One of the things I find most comforting about this time of year is how many amazing scents there are to enjoy. What is it about certain smells that have such a powerful effect on us?Plenty of research studies have linked our sense of smell to the amygdala and hippocampus, regions of the brain that are related to emotion and memory. This scent and memory connection has a name — olfactory memory — and it’s unique, since the visual, tactile, and auditory information we experience doesn’t pass through the same regions of the brain as olfactory information does.In simpler terms, scents will often bring up stronger emotions and memories than things you can touch, hear, or see.For me, the holiday season always had a major focus on the pine-fresh scent of a real Christmas tree that would adorn a corner of our living room when I was a kid. Sure, there was the sticky sap and endless shower of pine needles to contend with, but that woodsy smell seemed so worth it.Food is also often a source of scent memories for people, and I’m no exception. The smells that really take me back to my childhood Christmases mostly revolve around baked goods. Grandma’s sugar cookies with festive icing and sprinkles, rich butter tarts, and sweet fruitcake — all smelled as good as they tasted.And then there was the smoky, sooty smell of the wood-burning fireplace, a definite source of comfort on cold, snowy days. It was a luxury to curl up in the living room and enjoy the crackle of a fire on lazy winter break afternoons. It was also where Santa left messy footprints going in and out of the chimney each Christmas.With the possibility of a pared-down, socially-distanced holiday season this year, maybe we can experience memories of family gatherings past by immersing ourselves in the scents that we most associate with those times.That might mean baking your favourite dessert or cooking a traditional holiday meal, lighting some holiday-scented candles, breathing in some brisk winter air outdoors, or whatever else brings back some of your most cherished holiday memories.Stay safe, stay healthy, and enjoy!Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

As we near the holiday season and it remains unclear whether we’ll get to spend time with people who live outside of our homes, it will be important to find comfort and reasons to celebrate despite being apart.

One of the things I find most comforting about this time of year is how many amazing scents there are to enjoy. What is it about certain smells that have such a powerful effect on us?

Plenty of research studies have linked our sense of smell to the amygdala and hippocampus, regions of the brain that are related to emotion and memory. This scent and memory connection has a name — olfactory memory — and it’s unique, since the visual, tactile, and auditory information we experience doesn’t pass through the same regions of the brain as olfactory information does.

Friday, Dec. 4, 2020

Dreamstime.com
There’s nothing like holiday baking to stir up childhood memories of Christmas

Let’s use more digital technology in health care

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Preview

Let’s use more digital technology in health care

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Friday, Nov. 6, 2020

Digital Health Week is coming up, from Nov. 16 to 22, and it has me thinking a lot about our healthcare system here in Manitoba and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic.Digital Health Week is meant to celebrate and recognize the ways digital technology is helping to improve the delivery of care across Canada. Digital care allows for more convenient access to healthcare professionals through virtual appointments, better access to personal health information, and more comprehensive healthcare records that can be accessed by every provider you see.As I’m writing this, Winnipeg’s COVID-19 case numbers are skyrocketing and there’s a record number of people in hospital being treated for the virus. There are also COVID-19 outbreaks in multiple hospitals, and intensive care units are pretty much at capacity.With such an influx of cases, it’s no wonder many clinics and doctor’s offices are opting to treat patients remotely as much as possible. It’s an interesting change, considering just a year ago it would’ve been difficult, if not impossible, for me to schedule a virtual appointment with my doctor.The pandemic has highlighted not just the concerning weaknesses in our healthcare system overall but also the strangely behind-the-times operation of that system.Why was it so difficult to get healthcare remotely before? Why can’t we access our personal health information online, including test results? Why do we have to wait for weeks (or sometimes months) for a letter to be sent in the mail to find out when a diagnostic test is scheduled?It’s often a clunky, inefficient system that results in many patients feeling they have little control of their healthcare needs. Efficiency and ease of access for people should be top priority but this often seems not to be the case.A great example of a “why didn’t they just do that from the beginning?” scenario is the recent shift to online booking for COVID-19 tests. Instead of having people wait in line for hours or be turned away at testing sites after already having made the trip, online booking has proven to be a better option, according to recent provincial data that points to wait times of just minutes.I’m hoping the recent technology-based healthcare changes resulting from the pandemic are here to stay and a sign of even more improvements to come.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

Digital Health Week is coming up, from Nov. 16 to 22, and it has me thinking a lot about our healthcare system here in Manitoba and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Digital Health Week is meant to celebrate and recognize the ways digital technology is helping to improve the delivery of care across Canada. Digital care allows for more convenient access to healthcare professionals through virtual appointments, better access to personal health information, and more comprehensive healthcare records that can be accessed by every provider you see.

As I’m writing this, Winnipeg’s COVID-19 case numbers are skyrocketing and there’s a record number of people in hospital being treated for the virus. There are also COVID-19 outbreaks in multiple hospitals, and intensive care units are pretty much at capacity.

Friday, Nov. 6, 2020

Photo by Melody Rogan
Booking COVID-19 tests online has proven to be an efficient way of delivering an essential health care need.

Help fill collection gaps at Transcona Museum

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Preview

Help fill collection gaps at Transcona Museum

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Friday, Oct. 9, 2020

 

The Transcona Museum works to preserve and share the history and stories that have shaped the Transcona neighbourhood, but there are still some stories that museum staff would like to be able tell even better.During the Small Talk Tuesday event What’s Missing from the Collections at the Transcona Museum? held in late August, museum curator Alanna Horejda and assistant curator Jennifer Maxwell discussed what’s currently in the museum’s collection and what gaps there are.The museum currently has more than 50,000 items, with around 20,000 of those being slides. There are also textiles, natural history items, documents, newspapers, and photos. The largest item in the collection is the CN 2747 locomotive, which recently got a bit of a facelift, located in the Rotary Heritage Park on Plessis Road. Not all of the items in the collection are on display at any given time, as most are held in storage.So, with what already sounds like a large collection of items, what could the Transcona Museum possibly be missing?Horejda and Maxwell pointed out the noticeable gaps in the collection are items that represent a female perspective of life in Transcona (work life in particular). Most of the photos, items, and stories focus on men who lived and worked in the neighbourhood.There’s also a predominantly white perspective, which reflects the neighbourhood’s past but doesn’t fully represent its current demographic. Items from the LGBTQ+ community are also lacking, as are technological items from the past 60 years.Not surprisingly, items that help tell the stories of women, LGBTQ+ individuals, and visible minorities living in Transcona are something the museum is actively seeking. Museum staff are also looking for items that are linked to the history of South Transcona, and the former Bank of Toronto building (where the museum is now located).Items donated don’t necessarily have to be “old”. The museum is dedicated to preserving not just the history of Transcona but also its present-day stories.Since the museum’s storage is pretty much at capacity, donated items must have a very strong connection to the neighbourhood, donors must complete the necessary paperwork, and the items must be something the museum can properly maintain or store.You can book an appointment to have your item evaluated while the museum curator is available by emailing info@transconamuseum.mb.ca or calling (204) 222-0423.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com 

The Transcona Museum works to preserve and share the history and stories that have shaped the Transcona neighbourhood, but there are still some stories that museum staff would like to be able tell even better.

During the Small Talk Tuesday event What’s Missing from the Collections at the Transcona Museum? held in late August, museum curator Alanna Horejda and assistant curator Jennifer Maxwell discussed what’s currently in the museum’s collection and what gaps there are.

Friday, Oct. 9, 2020

Photo by Melody Rogan
Curators at the Transcona Museum are looking to fill some of the obvious gaps in the museum’s collection.

Calling attention to wasteful consumption

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Preview

Calling attention to wasteful consumption

Melody Rogan 5 minute read Friday, Sep. 11, 2020

I think just about everyone has thrown out perfectly good food at some point. Maybe it was a leftover meal you just weren’t in the mood to finish, or some items in the cupboard that were past their best before dates.When you consider that one-third of food produced for human consumption (about 1.3 billion tonnes) is wasted globally each year (based on United Nations’ data), it’s hard to wrap your head around how there could be more than 800 million people going hungry every day.To bring attention to this issue, last year the UN declared Sept. 29 International Day of Awareness on Food Loss and Waste Reduction.The day isn’t just about bringing awareness to wasted food but also wasted resources that go into producing wasted food, such as water, labour and fuel, as well as unnecessary contributions to greenhouse gas emissions.In a way, the COVID-19 pandemic has also highlighted the importance of access to and production of food. Panic buying, disruptions in supply chains, and labour shortages meant that many store shelves were empty. It was definitely an unnerving sight.So, what can you do to help stop food loss and waste reduction in your day-to-day life?To start, buy only what you need and will actually consume. Grocery lists and meal plans can keep you on track when you’re shopping and will help you limit what you’re throwing away. It’s also a great idea to make a list of items you’re throwing away frequently so you can adjust what you’re buying accordingly.If you prefer to buy in bulk but know you won’t use it all, consider reaching out to family and friends to see if you can share food items (safely, of course) and reduce waste that way.Eating leftovers by warming them up or using them to make a new meal is an easy way to cut down on your food waste, as is buying produce items that aren’t perfect-looking (some stores even offer a discount on “ugly” produce).If you have even a little bit of space for some pots or a garden patch, try growing as much of your own food as you can. In the winter, setting up grow lights or simply growing sprouts in a jar can help.Find some methods of fighting food waste that work for you, and visit www.un.org/en/observances/end-food-waste-day for more information and inspiration.Melody Rogan is a community correspondent for Radisson. You can email her at preeneditorial@gmail.com

I think just about everyone has thrown out perfectly good food at some point. Maybe it was a leftover meal you just weren’t in the mood to finish, or some items in the cupboard that were past their best before dates.

When you consider that one-third of food produced for human consumption (about 1.3 billion tonnes) is wasted globally each year (based on United Nations’ data), it’s hard to wrap your head around how there could be more than 800 million people going hungry every day.

To bring attention to this issue, last year the UN declared Sept. 29 International Day of Awareness on Food Loss and Waste Reduction.

Friday, Sep. 11, 2020

Melody Rogan
According to the United Nations, about 1.3 billion tonnes of food are wasted around the world each year.