Wendy Hrynkiw

Wendy Hrynkiw

East Kildonan community correspondent

Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

Recent articles of Wendy Hrynkiw

Donations needed for Ukrainian refugees

Wendy Hrynkiw 2 minute read Preview

Donations needed for Ukrainian refugees

Wendy Hrynkiw 2 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 22, 2022

The Welcome Centre at the Ukrainian National Federation, located at 935 Main Street, has been very busy receiving and distributing donations these past few months.

“Manitobans have opened their hearts, their wallets and their homes,” says Joanne Lewandosky, president of the Manitoba provincial council of the Ukrainian-Canadian Congress.

On May 23, Winnipeg welcomed over 300 Ukrainian refugees (and their pets). They travelled from Warsaw on a flight chartered by the Government of Canada. With the help of the Manitoba provincial council of the UCC, they were assisted with obtaining essentials such as social insurance numbers, medical cards, housing, and a daily shuttle to the Welcome Centre at UNF to “shop till they drop,” as Lewandosky put it.

Lewandosky proudly said “Winnipeg was chosen as the first destination to receive Ukrainian refugees because Winnipeg has the most organized Ukrainian community in Canada.”

Wednesday, Jun. 22, 2022

A note in a window outlines the items most needed by the Ukrainian-Canadian Congress, which seeks donations for Ukrainian refugees.

École Sun Valley School aids Ukrainian kids

Wendy Hrynkiw 3 minute read Preview

École Sun Valley School aids Ukrainian kids

Wendy Hrynkiw 3 minute read Friday, Mar. 25, 2022

During the crisis in Ukraine, teachers at École Sun Valley School are educating students about the situation, as well as on subjects such as human rights and freedom of speech, as well as teaching kids how they can help.

Two weeks ago, the school collected items to be shipped to Ukrainian refugees in Poland. Grade 4 student Brooklyn, explained that “we collected craft supplies, small toys and hygiene products that are being sent to the children of Ukraine. Many of these children had to leave their homes quickly.”

These items have been sent in connection with the efforts of Sts. Vladimir & Olga Cathedral, of the Ukrainian Catholic church.

Grade 4 student Nixon explained that a bike-a-thon was held from March 21 to 25 “to raise money for the Red Cross Ukrainian Humanitarian Crisis Fund. They help people by giving them food, medical supplies and shelter.”

Friday, Mar. 25, 2022

Grade 3 École Sun Valley School students Evelyn (left) and Bailey are during the school’s week-long bike-a-thon. Bailey’s mom made her shirt, which says “Stand for Freedom” on the front, and “Peace for Ukraine” on the sleeve.

Elmwood corner offers many services in one stop

Wendy Hrynkiw 2 minute read Preview

Elmwood corner offers many services in one stop

Wendy Hrynkiw 2 minute read Friday, Feb. 11, 2022

Although they’re at a new location with a new name, NetPrintShip Winnipeg and A6 Financial at the corner of Henderson Highway and Carmen Avenue are no strangers to the neighbourhood.

Keith Clark first purchased Vic’s Accounting at Henderson and Roberta Avenue in 2009, then re-named it a few years later to All Year Tax Services. 

He’s now a three-minute drive up Henderson Highway, and says “this new location is in a revitalizing corner of the city, and I see only good things happening here.”

Clark decided a new name was also in order, so A6 Financial takes over where All Year Tax Services left off, providing personal income tax and small-business income tax services, plus adding financial planning to its portfolio.  

Friday, Feb. 11, 2022

Keith Clark
The former Video World at the corner of Henderson Highway and Carmen Avenue is now the site of NetPrintShip Winnipeg and A6 Financial.

Teddy bear hugs for pediatric heart patients

Wendy Hrynkiw 4 minute read Preview

Teddy bear hugs for pediatric heart patients

Wendy Hrynkiw 4 minute read Tuesday, Dec. 28, 2021

Siena Caterina Smith is on a mission to collect 100 new teddy bears to donate to pediatric heart patients.  So far this year, she has collected 70.In 2012, on Siena’s first birthday, she received open heart surgery to correct a congenital heart defect.  While at the B.C. Children’s Hospital, she received a teddy bear that was a comfort to her during her surgery, recovery and her trip home to Winnipeg. As Manitoba does not have a pediatric cardiac surgical program, the Children’s Hospital Heart Centre in Winnipeg transfers approximately 100 children each year to other provinces for their heart surgery.Now 10 years old, Siena told me that “when I was little, I had heart surgery, and I got a teddy bear.  I had the idea that other kids would like to get one, too.”  That is why Siena has created a fundraiser called I ♥Bear Hugs.  She would like to collect a teddy bear to give to each of the children who will travel to have surgery, in order to ensure that each of the “heart heroes” (as the family calls them) receives a teddy bear hug to provide comfort.Siena’s parents, Mark and Sabrina Smith, say that, “as parents who watched their daughter go through heart surgery and receive her teddy bear, Luna, following the surgery, we have seen the impact of giving another child a teddy bear to hug and love.  Siena wants these bears to provide comfort to other children as they travel and go through a scary time in their lives.”So far Siena has collected teddy bears from family, friends, and her Frade 5 class at Balmoral Hall School. Her goal is to continue to collect 100 bears every year, in order to continue to provide a ‘teddy bear hug’ to every pediatric heart patient as they travel.  All bears collected will be delivered to the Children’s Heart Centre for distribution.If you would like to donate a new teddy bear to Siena’s I ♥ Bear Hugs fundraiser, or if you would like to donate money so that Siena can purchase more bears, please contact the Smith family at:  ilovebearhugs@shaw.caWendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

Siena Caterina Smith is on a mission to collect 100 new teddy bears to donate to pediatric heart patients.  So far this year, she has collected 70.

In 2012, on Siena’s first birthday, she received open heart surgery to correct a congenital heart defect.  While at the B.C. Children’s Hospital, she received a teddy bear that was a comfort to her during her surgery, recovery and her trip home to Winnipeg. As Manitoba does not have a pediatric cardiac surgical program, the Children’s Hospital Heart Centre in Winnipeg transfers approximately 100 children each year to other provinces for their heart surgery.

Now 10 years old, Siena told me that “when I was little, I had heart surgery, and I got a teddy bear.  I had the idea that other kids would like to get one, too.”  

Tuesday, Dec. 28, 2021

Supplied image
Siena Caterina Smith is pictured at age one (at left) holding with the teddy bear she receive after heart surgery
and today at age 10, with the bears she has collected so far this year.

Sun Valley students Ride Inside to raise funds

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Preview

Sun Valley students Ride Inside to raise funds

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Sunday, Nov. 28, 2021

Grade 4 and 5 students at École Sun Valley School recently came together to fundraise for the Ride Inside — Wheel with the Wheelers event.  Funds raised by this event, which is run by the CancerCare Manitoba Foundation, support PROFYLE (PRecision Oncology For Young peopLE). Seeking to find cures for the rarest and hardest to treat cancers in young people, this initiative gives children, adolescents and young adults who are out of conventional treatment options another chance to beat their cancer.“We are so fortunate to have many bike desks at our school and they are always in use,” said Grade 5 teacher Adam Rawdon.  “Since that was the case, we decided it was a natural fit to join Ride Inside and pedal them all day for a worthwhile cause. By participating in this event, our students are helping make a difference in someone else’s life, for kids who need it most.”The week-long event saw five classrooms of Grade 4 and 5 students taking turns riding.  Students rotated throughout the day and everyone in the following Teacher’s classes participated:  M. Rawdon, M. Donnelly, Mme. Desrochers, Mme. Ahrens-Townsend and Ms. Szota. “The day before we planned our day,” Grade 5 student Quinn Jurkowski  said. “ We used five bikes; three in the classroom and two in the hall. One was located by the office, where people could watch.”  “Some people did their school work while they biked, and others took a book in the hall to read while they rode,” said Madeleine Prairie, a Grade 4 student.  I asked Grade 5 student Noah Paterson how money was raised. He told me that the teachers “sent an email to parents with a website link for families and friends to donate”.  Quinn added that “signs were put up in the halls so that kids could ask parents in other classes”.  Some students also delivered flyers to houses in the neighbourhood. A “bike desk” has a desk surface and bike pedals underneath. Many classrooms have one and on a regular school day students can take turns using them. “Bike desks are a great way to have students exercise while they complete their daily learning activities,” Rawdon said. “They provide students a change from their stationary workstations into a more active setting.  We have found that they help students focus and reduce stress.”In speaking with these students and teacher, I found that each of their families had been impacted by cancer.  Rawdon said “it was an easy decision (for this group of teachers) to participate in this event and support this cause”.To date, they have raised over $2,000. Congratulations to these students and their teachers.Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

Grade 4 and 5 students at École Sun Valley School recently came together to fundraise for the Ride Inside — Wheel with the Wheelers event.  

Funds raised by this event, which is run by the CancerCare Manitoba Foundation, support PROFYLE (PRecision Oncology For Young peopLE). Seeking to find cures for the rarest and hardest to treat cancers in young people, this initiative gives children, adolescents and young adults who are out of conventional treatment options another chance to beat their cancer.

“We are so fortunate to have many bike desks at our school and they are always in use,” said Grade 5 teacher Adam Rawdon.  

Sunday, Nov. 28, 2021

Supplied photo by M. Donnelly
Madeleine Prairie rides at a bike desk during Ecole Sun Valley School’s week-long Ride Inside fundraising challenge.

Let wild animals fend for themselves

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Preview

Let wild animals fend for themselves

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2021

On my hikes, I have noticed that people leave things such as pumpkins, fruit and bird seed in parks for the wildlife. Wondering about this, I recently had the pleasure of speaking with Janine Wilmot, a human wildlife coexistence biologist with the Government of Manitoba, who “recognizes that people do this with the best intentions to help the wildlife, however unfortunately this is not the best choice.”Wilmot said there are negative impacts for both humans and the wildlife.Wilmot said most conflicts reported to the province are because of people feeding wildlife. She asked that you “remember that you are a visitor to their natural habitat, and to respect the local inhabitants”.Feeding wild animals unnatural food (that is, food not naturally found in their wild habitat) is not healthy for them. It can cause a chemical imbalance which can change the animal’s normal behaviour, disease, mouth and throat injuries or even death.  If wild animals become dependent on an artificial food source (such as humans feeding them) then they may become less able to survive on their own and will not pass important survival skills on to their young. They can also lose their natural fear of humans and pets, making them more likely to approach humans.  Animals that approach humans are likely to become aggressive because they know you have food. Humans who leave food behind for animals increase the likelihood of wild animals frequenting a location, making it dangerous for humans.  Wilmot said“any close encounter with wildlife is dangerous.”  She also said that feeding wildlife can result in an abundance of a species, and thus too many animals in an area.Wildlife congregate in high density at a feeding site, which is why hanging a birdfeeder at a park is not recommended. For example, all the birds at a feeder make a convenient buffet for a coyote.Wilmot is excited that people want to help wildlife, and suggested that you “channel your positivity” in other ways, such as donating your food to a wildlife rehabilitation centre or animal shelter. Or donate your time or money to any organization that protects animal habitats.There are other ways to use your food waste, such as composting or placing it in your leaf bag or yard waste bin on your City of Winnipeg collection day and it will be composted at Brady Landfill.For more information, please read:  https://www.gov.mb.ca/fish-wildlife/pubs/fish_wildlife/ws_areyoufeedingwildlife_fs.pdfWendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

On my hikes, I have noticed that people leave things such as pumpkins, fruit and bird seed in parks for the wildlife. 

Wondering about this, I recently had the pleasure of speaking with Janine Wilmot, a human wildlife coexistence biologist with the Government of Manitoba, who “recognizes that people do this with the best intentions to help the wildlife, however unfortunately this is not the best choice.”

Wilmot said there are negative impacts for both humans and the wildlife.

Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2021

Photo by Wendy Hrynkiw
Driving to Birds Hill Park the other day, correspondent Wendy Hrynkiw spied this sign. Please don’t leave your leftover pumpkin out somewhere for wildlife to feed on.

Bring out your fruit, bring out your fruit…

Wendy Hrynkiw 3 minute read Preview

Bring out your fruit, bring out your fruit…

Wendy Hrynkiw 3 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021

Jesse Oberman wants to pick your fruit, Winnipeg. He will come to your home and pick it (and clean up after himself), or you can pick it yourself and he will compensate you.

Oberman makes all-natural cider from “any edible fruit that is grown in your backyard, such as apples, pears, grapes, chokecherries, berries, etc.”  

A trained professional sommelier, Oberman and his partner were living in France, working at a winery, and hoping to become wine makers themselves when COVID hit. They soon rushed home to Winnipeg, leaving their dreams behind.

Using his extensive wine background, and frustrated by the food waste of unwanted and unpicked fruit in people’s yards, Oberman has started Next Friend Cider, a Manitoba-made, all-natural hard cider company.

Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021

Supplied photo by Manny Berkal-Sarbit
Pictured is Jesse Oberman with bottles of his Manitoba-made, Next Friend Cider. Next Friend’s ciders come in 750 ml glass bottles with branding he calls “trendy and minimalistic”.

Learning to live with coyotes

Wendy Hrynkiw 6 minute read Preview

Learning to live with coyotes

Wendy Hrynkiw 6 minute read Sunday, Jul. 11, 2021

I live near Rossmere Golf Course and there is much talk in my neighborhood about coyote sightings. I see one (or more) weekly or even daily.I recently saw Manitoba Conservation officer Sheldon Orvis going door-to-door to my neighbours in order to seek feedback and educate the community on the coyotes, so I flagged him down to chat.  “I wanted to reach out to every landowner on Rossmere Golf Course,” he said. The idea is to foster a relationship and understanding between humans and these creatures.Many of my neighbours have expressed concerns for their children or pets.  Orvis said that “in 120 years of record-keeping in North America, there have been only two human fatalities, ever, from a coyote attack,” and that “there is far more risk of attack from domestic dogs.”  By comparison, there are approximately 19 fatal domestic dog attacks in North America each year.“A coyote attack on a dog is very rare, and usually happens with an animal that is off-leash,” he said. If your animal is on-leash and under your control, you and your dog are not at risk from a nearby coyote.If you encounter a coyote while walking your dog, Orvis said that it is important you understand that the coyote is staking his territory and assessing the situation. “The coyote does not understand that your dog is fed store-bought food at home and sees him as competition to their food source, not as food.” Pick up your small dog and/or carry on your way and the coyote will leave you alone when he realizes you are not a threat.If you encounter a coyote, Orvis advises that you stay calm and assertive.  “They will pick up if you are scared and they understand non-verbal communication”.  Stand your ground and be dominant.  They will back off. If you feel more at ease, carry a walking stick in case you need to fend off a coyote.Orvis is proud of Winnipeg and its co-existence with coyotes. He says that we are poised to show North America how to live safely with coyotes in our communities. The top thing Orvis wants to tell people is: “Do not feed the coyotes.”  He said human food causes an imbalance to the coyote’s body that will cause the coyotes to become aggressive to humans. “Coyotes do a great job of keeping our communities green by eating vermin that cause us grief, such as mice, voles, rats and skunks,” Orvis said.  He has found several instances in our community of people feeding or making beds for coyotes, and kindly asks that people refrain from doing so.He said his goal is to act as a referee between wildlife and humans.  He endeavors to “be the voice for wildlife that otherwise wouldn’t have one.” He concluded by saying that “the coyotes have figured out how to live with humans, however the humans are worried about animals they don’t understand.”  Orvis hopes to hold community meetings to educate the public on coyotes, once COVID-19 restrictions allow.If you see alarming or aggressive behaviour by a coyote, contact Manitoba Conservation at 204-945-5221Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

I live near Rossmere Golf Course and there is much talk in my neighborhood about coyote sightings. I see one (or more) weekly or even daily.

I recently saw Manitoba Conservation officer Sheldon Orvis going door-to-door to my neighbours in order to seek feedback and educate the community on the coyotes, so I flagged him down to chat.  

“I wanted to reach out to every landowner on Rossmere Golf Course,” he said. The idea is to foster a relationship and understanding between humans and these creatures.

Sunday, Jul. 11, 2021

Photo by Tina Boucher
Tina Boucher spotted a mom, dad and five coyote pups near the corner of Concordia Avenue and Gateway Road on the evening of July 5.

Plenty brewing at Empty Cup Collective

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Preview

Plenty brewing at Empty Cup Collective

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Wednesday, Apr. 21, 2021

Last week I spied the word “COFFEE” atop a blue tin roof just south of the Nairn Avenue and Panet Road intersection.  I love to support local (especially during these tough times for businesses), so I had to check it out.  I stopped in to find a newly opened, locally-owned coffee shop with a chic, stylish interior, serving specialty graded coffee from all over the world that is roasted on site, served hot or as nitro cold brew on tap.“Empty Cup Collective is more than just a coffee shop”, says owner Marc Tallman, “we also serve beer, pizza and wine.”  The menu includes coffee, tea and pastries, as well as oatmeal, bowls and sandwiches.  After business hours, you can enjoy some wine, add a shot of Bailey’s to your coffee beverage, sip a Trans Canada Brewing Company beer and enjoy pizza made by Timmy Tom’s Pizzeria. There is indoor and outdoor seating, with hopes to expand the patio in the future.Tallman says he was inspired by his own travels and love of coffee, and used his experiences from around the world to create the concept.  He says that he “found many specialty graded coffees to be acidic,” so he strived to make a better cup.“This started as a cold brew business idea”, Tallman explains. “Cold brew is coffee pushed through nitrogen to make it creamier, frothier and sweeter.”  One of this café’s specialties is its nitro lattes, and Empty Cup plans to sell its nitro cold brew in cans soon.Behind the coffee bar is clear glass, through which you can see into their production facility, which includes its roasting and cold brew equipment.The coffee roaster used at Empty Cup is the only one of its kind in Winnipeg.  Tallman says “the Loring 35 kilogram roaster is the most efficient and most automated coffee roaster out there,” adding that they acquired this large roasting machine in order to produce amounts for themselves and Princess Auto stores.Empty Cup produces the coffee served free to customers at all Princess Auto locations in Canada, and also makes K-Cup pods for sale in those stores, under a private label called Blue Truck Coffee by Empty Cup.The future for the Empty Cup Collective is to sell coffee to restaurants and coffee shops, and they are excited to be opening their second location in Sage Creek in late June.Empty Cup Collective is located at 2 – 535 Panet Rd.  Business hours are 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday to Saturday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. SundayFor more information, visit www.emptycup.coWendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

Last week I spied the word “COFFEE” atop a blue tin roof just south of the Nairn Avenue and Panet Road intersection.  I love to support local (especially during these tough times for businesses), so I had to check it out.  

I stopped in to find a newly opened, locally-owned coffee shop with a chic, stylish interior, serving specialty graded coffee from all over the world that is roasted on site, served hot or as nitro cold brew on tap.

“Empty Cup Collective is more than just a coffee shop”, says owner Marc Tallman, “we also serve beer, pizza and wine.”  

Wednesday, Apr. 21, 2021

Supplied photo
Empty Cup Collective serves specialty graded coffee, cold-pressed brews, wine, beer and pizza. It also produces Blue Truck Coffee by Empty Cup for Princess Auto.

Budding reporters share their stories

Wendy Hrynkiw 6 minute read Preview

Budding reporters share their stories

Wendy Hrynkiw 6 minute read Friday, Mar. 19, 2021

It was recently my great pleasure to join Mrs. Paul and Ms. Prigroski’s Grade 1-2 divisional remote learning classes online for I Love to Read week, to explain to the kids what I do as a “reporter.”These teachers have found creative ways to deliver material online this school year, and challenged their students to be reporters, too. Students interviewed each other, and were told to “include the who, what, when, where, why and how.”  Mrs. Paul explained that “a good reporter uses a hook to grab the reader’s attention.  They use juicy words to make their story come alive. Then they finish it off with a bow, to wrap everything up nice and neat.”The students’ articles were all emailed to me to read. What an incredibly beautiful job they did. I wish I could share them all with you. Here is a shout-out for each article I read:From Mrs. Paul’s class, Annika said that “at first it was hard not seeing my friends” but that her teacher Mrs. Paul “taught us to use MS Teams and introduced us to our classmates”.  Rupman said that he is “grateful for all the help I get from my teachers and family”.Racen said “it was a great learning process since I was able to use the device I love the most, my iPad,” and added that Mrs. Paul is “smart, very patient and awesome”.Bennett wrote that he learned to use a laptop including tools and shortcuts, and Elliott, Jasreet and Rupman also said they learned to use computers. Leah said that “online learning is fun but I can’t wait to go back to school”, and I must say that Manveer has excellent penmanship,From Ms. Prigroski’s class, Thomas said he learned to use Teams and OneNote, Kyla learned to type and Felix likes that his “teacher is nice.”  Tom saidthat his reading has gotten much better, and Everent said he liked to read to Patrick. Reeve said he enjoys the “morning race”, and Gage likes doing school at home.Alex sent me wonderful photos of his work, and Emma wrote a story too long to print here (she will need her own column).Evan wrote a story about his favourite school assignment this year, and his article included a photo (just like mine).Many students commented on their use of technology.  Teacher Cathy Paul said that “our students are young and even if they were using technology, they probably weren’t using it in this way.  They have made enormous strides in their competency as learners, users and producers of technology”.Cassandra Prigroski said that “this school year has been like no other” especially with “getting to know my students through a computer screen.”  She adapted her lessons for digital completion, and both teachers show their students how to navigate and use all the websites and resources.Both teachers told me how proud they are of all their students’ achievements this year.Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

It was recently my great pleasure to join Mrs. Paul and Ms. Prigroski’s Grade 1-2 divisional remote learning classes online for I Love to Read week, to explain to the kids what I do as a “reporter.”

These teachers have found creative ways to deliver material online this school year, and challenged their students to be reporters, too. Students interviewed each other, and were told to “include the who, what, when, where, why and how.”  

Mrs. Paul explained that “a good reporter uses a hook to grab the reader’s attention.  They use juicy words to make their story come alive. Then they finish it off with a bow, to wrap everything up nice and neat.”

Friday, Mar. 19, 2021

Supplied image
(Clockwise from top left) Bennett, Jasreet, Tom and Kyla show off the stories they wrote as reporters after an I Love to Read month class with special guest Wendy Hrynkiw.

Learning all about remote learning

Wendy Hrynkiw 7 minute read Preview

Learning all about remote learning

Wendy Hrynkiw 7 minute read Friday, Feb. 19, 2021

It was my great pleasure to be invited to participate in the online celebration of I Love to Read month in the River East Transcona School Division, where I had the opportunity to talk to students about the challenges of remote learning.While speaking to students about my job as a community correspondent with The Herald, I asked if they would help me write my next article, since I had no idea about remote learning.There were two things that I heard most from students: that technology is a challenge; and they miss their friends.Clare (Grade 4) said of technology that “people get ‘frozen’ or I can’t hear,” and Kennedy (Grade 3) says that she “doesn’t like looking at a screen all day.”  Brady (Grade 4) added that “sometimes work goes missing, things disappear and you can’t find it.”Tia (Grade 4) said she “misses her friends and getting together in after-school programs,” while Shae (Grade 8) “doesn’t know what some of her classmates look like.”Wynter (Grade 4) “enjoys the time at home with family and her dog, but misses seeing her friends”.RETSD Grade 3 and 4 remote learning teacher Ashley Officer said that “teaching and learning is difficult because no one has ever learned online before.” Grade 7 and 8 remote learning teacher Kyle Warnica said that his “challenge with online learning is not being able to help a student with the aid of a visual clue, such as a facial expression (if their camera isn’t on). “In a classroom, a student may give a visual clue like slumped shoulders, for example, and helps me determine if they may need extra assistance.”  Warnica said that parent support is crucial and that “families are asked to make sure support is given to students when needed; it is a team effort with home support.”Carter (Grade 3) says that “some of his assignments are hard and (his) family doesn’t understand”; and Cayden (Grade 4) added that “learning at home is kind of hard because sometimes I don’t get it.”  Officer added that there is time each day where students can schedule one-on-one time with their teacher for extra help and that there is also an online chat for help.There are some things the kids really liked about learning at home. I heard talk of going to school in one’s pyjamas (not naming names on that one).  Jeychel (Grade 4) “likes that you don’t have to walk to school outside on the cold days,” and Ryan-Lynne (Grade 3) “loves that you can go to school anywhere in the house, and you are not confined to a chair in the school.” Melanie (Grade 4) “likes that you don’t have to get up early to get ready for school, you can just stay on the couch all day.”Noel (Grade 7), however, is “upset that his parents won’t let him use a band saw” at home; I took his parents’ side on this one.Jaidynn (Grade 4) complimented her teaching team by saying that she “feels lucky to have great teachers, that this would be harder if we didn’t.”The most important thing I heard came from Axl (Grade 3), who said that “the best thing about remote learning is that we are safe from getting COVID.”Thank you to these teachers and students for allowing me to spend time with their classes, We all learned something.Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

It was my great pleasure to be invited to participate in the online celebration of I Love to Read month in the River East Transcona School Division, where I had the opportunity to talk to students about the challenges of remote learning.

While speaking to students about my job as a community correspondent with The Herald, I asked if they would help me write my next article, since I had no idea about remote learning.

There were two things that I heard most from students: that technology is a challenge; and they miss their friends.

Friday, Feb. 19, 2021

Photo supplied by the Fillion fa
Jaidynn Fillion, a Grade 4 remote learning student, is reading to her cat Whisky for I Love to Read month

COVID piñatas provide a welcome release

Wendy Hrynkiw 4 minute read Preview

COVID piñatas provide a welcome release

Wendy Hrynkiw 4 minute read Friday, Jan. 22, 2021

Students at John Pritchard School on Henderson Highway recently received a special surprise — a parcel containing a COVID pinata that encouraged them to “Kick COVID” by getting outside, getting some fresh air and releasing some of the anger and frustration this pandemic has caused.“Kicking the COVID pinata was a fun way of taking some of the power back from this deadly virus that keeps looming over us,” said Liz Loewen, a teacher at John Pritchard.“The students laughed and were able to relieve some stress that has been building. We are continually reminding our students that there are brighter days ahead and we are soon going to turn a corner if we continue to work together.”The pinata was made and distributed by Shannon Schultz, a former teacher, artist and the author of children’s books that encourage the celebration of children with differences.The pinata was crafted using household items, including toilet paper rolls as the nodules on the sides  (a nice touch, since TP was such an iconic symbol of the first wave of the pandemic). The pinata  received by John Pritchard School contained Hershey’s Hugs, Kisses, and Lifesavers since, Schultz said, “COVID has prevented us from getting the hugs and kisses we want from loved ones.”  There was also some birdseed inside because “this COVID stuff is for the birds,” she added.Schultz has made nearly 40 of the pinatas and distributed them throughout the community, to Teachers, hospital staff, local businesses, even politicians.  She said that  smashing the pinatas can help “remove anger and frustration out of your system,” and that there is a “release you feel when you break it.”“The idea started as a therapy for adults”, Schultz added. She encourages everyone to make their own COVID pinatas and smash them in a safe place. She recently made one that was filled with birdseed and smashed at Birds Hill Park.Schultz said “our common enemy is this virus, and we will have victory over it and lives will be saved”. Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

Students at John Pritchard School on Henderson Highway recently received a special surprise — a parcel containing a COVID pinata that encouraged them to “Kick COVID” by getting outside, getting some fresh air and releasing some of the anger and frustration this pandemic has caused.

“Kicking the COVID pinata was a fun way of taking some of the power back from this deadly virus that keeps looming over us,” said Liz Loewen, a teacher at John Pritchard.

“The students laughed and were able to relieve some stress that has been building. We are continually reminding our students that there are brighter days ahead and we are soon going to turn a corner if we continue to work together.”

Friday, Jan. 22, 2021

Supplied photo
Artist and author Shannon Schultz has made more than 40 COVID pinatas, some filled with treats and others, such as this one in Birds Hill Park, filled with birdseed. She says smashing the viral cell-shaped pinatas helps kids and adults alike release tension and frustration.

Merry Skype-mas to all, and to all a good night

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Preview

Merry Skype-mas to all, and to all a good night

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2020

 

Wow, Christmas looked different this year.  Who would have ever imagined?We had “Skype-mas”. It took some planning but we pulled off a safe Christmas. In the end all that matters is that I kept my family safe.Skype-ing Christmas was no easy feat with my family, however. There were technical issues, as many family members do not own cell phones, computers nor have internet service. Once this was figured out, we had a plan.Christmas gifts to each other were delivered beforehand, curbside, of course.On Christmas Day, I cooked my Christmas dinner, as usual. Turkey and all the fixings. I made all my Christmas baking, as usual; everyone’s favourites. Then came hot curbside pick-up at my house. Everyone headed home and logged into Skype. We ate our dinner together, we opened our gifts together and we played games together.I gave everyone a box of game supplies in their packages. A bottle of Vaseline and a pompom attached to a ribbon — you put some Vaseline on your nose, put the end of the ribbon in your mouth, and try to stick the pompom to your nose. I had to decide if I was going to be competitive (and play) or if I was going to sit it out and watch my Dad do this. We did one at a time so that everyone could watch and laugh, and we timed each person to determine a winner.Everyone got a wooden skewer and some screws for screw stacking. Everyone also got a popsicle stick (to put between your teeth) and set of dice to stack on it. Everyone got secret clues in an envelope to act out charades. Everyone got a piece of paper and pen and had to write down a Christmas carol that started with each letter of the alphabet, in three minutes (OK, three minutes was not long enough).And that’s what we did.  We made the best of it. I think my family was mad that I didn’t get upset about not having everyone over to my house. The truth is that I didn’t have to clean my house or dust or take out the ugly ornaments they made me or scrub my bathroom for guests or even wear pants while Skype-ing. It was kind of awesome for me, and much less work.I wish all of my readers the very best of the holiday season and, with more meaning than ever, a safe and happy new year.Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca 

Wow, Christmas looked different this year.  Who would have ever imagined?

We had “Skype-mas”. It took some planning but we pulled off a safe Christmas. In the end all that matters is that I kept my family safe.

Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2020

Photo by Heather Turnbull-Smith
Pictured is a virtual Christmas party Wendy Hrynkiw and her husband had with their closest friends. Dinner was delivered and they all ate together, drank together (without anyone having to drive), and played games until the wee hours.

Making masks a way of contributing

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Making masks a way of contributing

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Friday, Nov. 27, 2020

North Kildonan resident Carole Sinnott has been very busy at her sewing machine during the COVID-19 pandemic, sewing masks for Face Masks for Manitoba, a local organization that provides free reusable face masks to any Manitoban who needs (and requests) one.  To date, they have distributed over 12,000 masks to the elderly, schools, teachers, non-profits and hospitals, to name a few.Face Masks for Manitoba is a group of volunteers. Sinnott has been sewing her whole life for enjoyment and saw a need for her sewing skills in early March, as the crisis developed.  “It started as something to occupy my time while at home,” Sinnott said. “By making masks for family and friends from leftover fabric from previous projects.”  Then one day she saw an article about Face Masks for Manitoba, contacted them to donate fabric and, at the same time, requested a kit to make masks. Once a week, a package is dropped off at her home containing everything she needs to make 24 to 30 masks, including fabric, elastic, thread and pins. At the same time, the masks she made in the past week are picked up.  Sinnott estimated she has made over 1,600 masks since she started.  “It gives me a feeling of contribution,” Sinnott said. “For people who go out to work and have children in school, they need many masks to cover all the days of the week and all the members of the family; this can get quite costly”Ratna Pandey, an organizer at Face Masks for Manitoba, said “Carole has been one of our most awesome team members. She makes 60 to 65 masks per week and is a sewing superstar.“(She) has been a backbone volunteer for us, and we couldn’t do it without Carole and the other volunteers like her.”Pandey’s 14-year-old daughter, Jaya Cosway, is the lead organizer of Face Masks for Manitoba, which currently has orders for over 5,000 masks. It is a donation-based group and is running low on funds and supplies. If you have fabric to donate, find their GoFundMe page to donate to this wonderful cause.  “Our goal is to do our part to help slow the spread of COVID-19, and to bring a little bit of comfort and security back to Manitobans during this crisis,” Pandey said.Visit www.facemaskmb.com  to learn more about how to request a free mask, how to volunteer to sew, or how to donate.Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

North Kildonan resident Carole Sinnott has been very busy at her sewing machine during the COVID-19 pandemic, sewing masks for Face Masks for Manitoba, a local organization that provides free reusable face masks to any Manitoban who needs (and requests) one.  

To date, they have distributed over 12,000 masks to the elderly, schools, teachers, non-profits and hospitals, to name a few.

Face Masks for Manitoba is a group of volunteers. Sinnott has been sewing her whole life for enjoyment and saw a need for her sewing skills in early March, as the crisis developed.  

Friday, Nov. 27, 2020

Supplied photo by Clark Sinnott
North Kildonan’s Carole Sinnott sews 60 to 65 masks per week for Face Masks for Manitoba.

Exploring alternative healing

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Exploring alternative healing

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Friday, Oct. 30, 2020

East Kildonan resident Loralie is an alternative healer and, upon meeting her, you will immediately understand why she helps to heal your mind, body and spirit. She has an energy about her that instantly makes you feel good.  It is because of this that Loralie’s friends encouraged her to get certified as an emotion code and body code practitioner.The emotion code is a process that can identify negative emotions from our own past experiences or which have inherited from our ancestors. Once the source is identified, it is “cleared” or released.The body code works to help identify and remove energy imbalances that may contribute to physical and emotional issues. The release of trapped energy is said to promote the healing of the nervous system.Loralie helps with emotional healing by removing your “heart wall.”  When you have put up a wall around your heart to block a past emotion (such as the loss of a person or relationship), this unresolved pain can block you from moving on. She says that by removing your heart wall, “you will feel (emotionally) lighter and able to move forward; possibilities are endless and each experience is individual.”Energy healing is an alternative healing method that activates the body’s energy systems to remove blocks. By breaking through these energetic blocks, the body’s inherent ability to heal itself is stimulated. It should be noted that this kind of healing does not take the place of seeing your medical doctor. Loralie reminds that she “is not a doctor and (does) not give medical advice.”Loralie conducts her sessions online at headtosoulhealingenergy.com, and she says “we are all made of energy and I connect to the person’s energy field (with their permission).”  Each session is different and “depends on what you would like to work on and what your body is ready to release.”“I am passionate about the body code healing energy,” Loralie says, and she uses this technique in order to work with your energy.  “It brings me great joy to see the shift in people and to see them release the things that are holding them back in life,” Loralie says. “Whether it be physical or emotional pain, or the many ways we can be spiritually or energetically blocked or struggling”.There are many testimonials on Loralie’s website from people who have had significant results. If you are interested in learning more, visit headtosoulhealingenergy.comWendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

East Kildonan resident Loralie is an alternative healer and, upon meeting her, you will immediately understand why she helps to heal your mind, body and spirit. She has an energy about her that instantly makes you feel good.  

It is because of this that Loralie’s friends encouraged her to get certified as an emotion code and body code practitioner.

The emotion code is a process that can identify negative emotions from our own past experiences or which have inherited from our ancestors. Once the source is identified, it is “cleared” or released.

Friday, Oct. 30, 2020

Supplied photo
Loralie is certified as an emotion code and body code practitioner.

‘Fall-ing’ in love with hiking in Manitoba

Wendy Hrynkiw 6 minute read Preview

‘Fall-ing’ in love with hiking in Manitoba

Wendy Hrynkiw 6 minute read Friday, Oct. 2, 2020

As part of my family’s staycation this year, we enjoyed some beautiful Manitoba hiking trails. The amazing colours of fall are not to be missed, and hiking is definitely the best way we have found to enjoy them.  Before this year, we didn’t really know what actual hiking was. Living in East Kildonan, we often walk the Northeast Pioneers Gateway, along Bunn’s Creek and in Birds Hill Park; all are wonderful and handy to where we live.A few weeks ago, our first real hike was the Top of the World trail at Falcon Lake. This 3.4 kilometre trail required the kids to load a trail app on their phones to navigate, as we could not have found our way without them.  It started as a fairly wide trail, then became narrower as we moved into rocky and forested landscape. We climbed rocky paths, over tree roots, and when we got to the “top of the world”, it was worth it for the incredible bird’s-eye view of Falcon Lake. For our first time hiking, this trail was incredible and we were excited to try another trail.We may have been a little too excited when we chose McGillivray Falls self-guiding rail next.  On paper it is a 4.3-kilometre moderate trail (longer than the last one) so “perfect”, we thought.  Almost immediately, we walked up a rock hill alongside waterfalls, crossed a narrow bridge, scaled some more rock, and moved into the forest along a narrow path full of rocks and tree roots. We carefully watched every step in the thick forest, and eventually emerged at McGillivray Lake.  The walk back across a lot of Canadian Shield rock was easier. Over all it was a beautiful, fun and challenging but do-able excursion.  Once again, the kids navigated with their phone apps, which I would recommend for the first time on this trail.We wanted more, and had heard people rant and rave about Pine Point Trail at Pine Point Rapids, but hesitated because it is nine kilometres long. We started out thinking we would do the short trail, as there is an option halfway in to continue or to loop back.  I couldn’t be prouder to tell you that we did the whole thing. It was so beautiful, fun and amazing that we couldn’t resist. The first part was rocky and forested, taking us along the Whiteshell River and passing some rapids. The second loop was challenging, with narrow paths through the forest, up and down a rocky landscape, and past two more sets of rapids. I huffed and puffed on that last rocky hill-climb.  The 2.4 kilometre walk back to the car was along wide, level, groomed path — thank goodness.  We did not use an app this time, as a friend had given us a tip: he said to look for the route markers on four-foot tall white posts with orange rings around the top.  We did this and were able to find our way with no trouble at all.This is our new fall thing to do.  No matter what time of year is your favorite, I recommend connecting with nature and enjoying beautiful Manitoba.Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

As part of my family’s staycation this year, we enjoyed some beautiful Manitoba hiking trails. The amazing colours of fall are not to be missed, and hiking is definitely the best way we have found to enjoy them.  

Before this year, we didn’t really know what actual hiking was. Living in East Kildonan, we often walk the Northeast Pioneers Gateway, along Bunn’s Creek and in Birds Hill Park; all are wonderful and handy to where we live.

A few weeks ago, our first real hike was the Top of the World trail at Falcon Lake. This 3.4 kilometre trail required the kids to load a trail app on their phones to navigate, as we could not have found our way without them.  It started as a fairly wide trail, then became narrower as we moved into rocky and forested landscape. We climbed rocky paths, over tree roots, and when we got to the “top of the world”, it was worth it for the incredible bird’s-eye view of Falcon Lake. For our first time hiking, this trail was incredible and we were excited to try another trail.

Friday, Oct. 2, 2020

Wendy Hrynkiw
The fall colours were in full effect along the Pine Point trail on Sept. 25.

Local mask maker unveiled

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Preview

Local mask maker unveiled

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Friday, Sep. 11, 2020

There are signs on street corners around my neighborhood for homemade masks by JoJo and CoCo.  I love to support local businesses, so I thought I would share with you that I found JoJo and CoCo and ordered masks for my family.What began as a hobby sewer making homemade masks for her family and friends has grown into a small business making items that are in high demand.  “I started out thinking, ‘How can I help keep our community safer from Covid 19?’”  JoJo said. “Especially seniors, children and those with underlying conditions.”She initially donated some of her masks to seniors and to Knowles Centre.JoJo started with a pattern she found online, however it wasn’t the best shape, size nor most comfortable. Experimenting on family and friends, she endured by trial and error until she came up with the most practical design. She uses premium quality fabrics, and says that “if you have to wear a mask, it better look good.”Once she perfected her mask, she put up several homemade signs on neighborhood boulevards, and is now busy filling orders. JoJo believes in “quality over quantity for my masks,” and due to the high demand potential buyers may face a wait of up to a week.  JoJo “thanks everyone for their patience and understanding” as she makes each mask by herself.  She has, however, enlisted her boyfriend, mother, sister and nephews to help with cutting elastics and being models for sizing purposes.  She said “family is very important to me, and I am grateful for my family’s support and help.”Visit her Facebook page, where you can choose your favourite fabric, size, and place your order.  Masks are pre-shrunk 100 per cent cotton in two layers, with adjustable ear loops and are available in adult, teen and child sizes. Search  for JoJo and CoCo on Facebook.And who is CoCo?  Jojo’s trusty sidekick is her (non-shedding, hypoallergenic) dog.“He loves to listen to the sewing machine, the sound often puts him to sleep, then he waits patiently for people to pick up their masks,” she said.Manitoba Health recommends that you wash your hands before putting on your mask, and avoid touching your mask or face while wearing it. Ensure that your mask fits well and covers your nose, mouth and chin.  If you are wearing a non-medical (one-time use) mask, wear the blue side out (which my hospital-working daughter recently pointed out). Visit the Health Canada website for more information on how to wear a mask properly www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/video/covid-19-wear-non-medical-mask-face-covering-properly.html Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

There are signs on street corners around my neighborhood for homemade masks by JoJo and CoCo.  I love to support local businesses, so I thought I would share with you that I found JoJo and CoCo and ordered masks for my family.

What began as a hobby sewer making homemade masks for her family and friends has grown into a small business making items that are in high demand.  

“I started out thinking, ‘How can I help keep our community safer from Covid 19?’”  JoJo said. “Especially seniors, children and those with underlying conditions.”

Friday, Sep. 11, 2020

Supplied photo
Mask maker Jojo (holding her canine partner, Coco) shows off some of her creations, assisted by family members she has enlisted to help.

Explore Manitoba at a fishing lodge

Wendy Hrynkiw 3 minute read Preview

Explore Manitoba at a fishing lodge

Wendy Hrynkiw 3 minute read Monday, Jul. 13, 2020

This pandemic has given Manitobans the best opportunity to plan a day trip or longer right here at home.  

I have never been fishing but this is definitely the year to experience something new and see amazing places in Manitoba; and you can be proud of ‘supporting local’ during these tough financial times for businesses.

I spoke with Anita Wiens at Viking Lodge in Cranberry Portage, a seven-hour drive from Winnipeg on paved highways, where they have 16 cabins for rent, RV sites and camping.  Viking Lodge boasts that “with over 52 miles of lakes and rivers accessible by boat right from our docks, you will never run out of places to explore.”

Here you can catch walleye, lake trout, northern pike, with rainbow trout and brook trout nearby.

Monday, Jul. 13, 2020

Supplied photo
Anita Wiens of Viking Lodge shows off a lake trout caught on First Cranberry Lake.

Bringing Newfoundland to East Kildonan

Wendy Hrynkiw 3 minute read Preview

Bringing Newfoundland to East Kildonan

Wendy Hrynkiw 3 minute read Monday, Jun. 15, 2020

What can you do when there is a pandemic and you can’t travel to your favourite place?  Bring your favourite place to where you are.  

That’s what we did recently for my friend Elizabeth’s 16th birthday party.  

She was feeling homesick for her native Newfoundland, especially since she was unable to travel home for spring break or the upcoming summer holidays, so we brought Newfoundland to my garage.

We invited a group of 10 people (the maximum allowed at the time), and partied Newfoundland-style.

Monday, Jun. 15, 2020

Photo supplied by Ian Trushell
Correspondent Wendy Hrynkiw and her daughter threw a Newfoundlad-themed party for their friend Elizabeth's Sweet 16th birthday.

Stay a shade ahead in the sun

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Stay a shade ahead in the sun

Wendy Hrynkiw 3 minute read Wednesday, May. 20, 2020

I love my sunglasses, and will rarely be seen outside without them. I have spent a small fortune on sunglasses over the years and wondered if it is necessary to spend a lot of money to get the best protection. So I went to an expert to find out.

Dr. Christian Peloquin, an optometrist at Henderson Vision Centre (1439 Henderson Hwy.), says “sunglasses are important to protect your eyes from harmful ultraviolet light rays.  UV rays can lead to (or worsen) eye conditions, most notably cataracts.

“When purchasing a pair of sunglasses, the buyer should look for labels on the lenses that indicate the lenses do what we intend for them to do — block UV rays. The Canadian Association of Optometrists advises that buyers should ‘choose quality sunglasses…that block out 99 to 100 per cent of UV-A and UV-B radiation and screen out 75 to 90 per cent of visible light’.”

I also asked Dr. Peloquin about UV protection options for prescription eyeglass wearers. There are three options and I will list these from least expensive to most expensive:

Wednesday, May. 20, 2020

Wendy Hrynkiw
Vuarnet, Bolle, Guess, Ray-Ban... my own personal evolution and love affair with sunglasses inspired this article.

Nothing gets in the way of game night

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Nothing gets in the way of game night

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Thursday, Apr. 16, 2020

My house is well known for hosting “game night” on Saturdays. We have a huge stack of games and a group of regulars who show up to have some fun. We haven’t let a little thing like a global pandemic ruin our game nights, either. We’ve been playing games online to keep in touch and have some fun during these unprecedented times:On the first missed game night, my daughter and I went through our stack of games to see which we could adapt to online and remote play.  We came up with “Skype-A-Gories”, which I invented. We took our regular Scattergories game and typed up our own game cards.  Then we emailed the Word document to our friends to print at home. At our agreed time we Skyped each other, and there they were —  all my friends ready to play.Everyone had their beverages and snacks of choice, and we were ready. I rolled the letter dice and set the timer at my end, then we all wrote our answers until the buzzer went off. The usual arguing ensued over answers, and then we were on to the next card. We played and laughed for the better part of two hours.Another friend mentioned a phone app called Houseparty. We tried this next. It is like Skype (where you can see everyone), and it features games you can play with your friends. Everyone player needs a device, though. There are several trivia games, a fill-in-the-blank-style game, a drawing game and Heads Up (like on Ellen). It was also hours of fun and catching up with friends.For the group of people who enjoy Cards Against Humanity we are using an app called Evil Apples.  However, it doesn’t enable players to see or hear each other. It is not as much fun to play remotely, so we fixed that…  by putting on our long johns and winter boots, grabbing some lawn chairs, and having a bonfire. We made a very exaggerated social-distancing circle, and played outside with friends.This is where I admit to you that I had never Skyped before and required my daughter to set that part up for me. I learned that by using Skype with your friends, you actually have to change out of your pajamas and put make-up on. That is to say — you have to act human again.That said, we are not going to let a little thing like a pandemic interrupt our game nights.  I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the front-line workers keeping us healthy and fed. Stay safe, everyone.Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

My house is well known for hosting “game night” on Saturdays.

We have a huge stack of games and a group of regulars who show up to have some fun. We haven’t let a little thing like a global pandemic ruin our game nights, either. We’ve been playing games online to keep in touch and have some fun during these unprecedented times.

On the first missed game night, my daughter and I went through our stack of games to see which we could adapt to online and remote play.  

Thursday, Apr. 16, 2020

Herald
Skype-A-Gories, an online variation of Scattergories, has become a game night hit for correspondent Wendy Hrynkiw and her friends on Saturday game nights.

I was a ‘human book’ at Sun Valley School

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I was a ‘human book’ at Sun Valley School

Wendy Hrynkiw 6 minute read Friday, Mar. 20, 2020

I had the most wonderful morning at Sun Valley School last month, being a ‘book’ in their Human Library. As part of I Love to Read month, teacher-librarian Cathy Paul arranged fun reading activities for the students of this kindergarten to Grade 5 school.Students had the opportunity to choose from a selection of 23 human ‘library books’ that included athletes, a musician, a lawyer, a fire fighter, an ecologist, artist, an MLA, a school trustee, historians and a railway mechanic. There were specialists in technology, food, prosthetics, pets and medical laboratories; an RCAF sergeant, and a community columnist from The Herald.When a student came to the library to borrow their ‘book,’ they selected a real person (who was wearing a name tag stating their occupation). We then went to their classrooms where we told the stories of what we do as our work, passion or hobby. Students were given the opportunity to engage in conversation with their books, then books were returned to the library where they were able to take out a different human book. During the one hour allotted for this activity, most classrooms got through five or six human books.“I see this as an opportunity for my students at Sun Valley School to open their minds to all of the possibilities that life has to offer them and to develop their capacity for empathy for others” Cathy Paul said.As part of my own presentation, I made sure to involve students and staff in my upcoming article… to increase readership, of course.  I am sure they will all be looking to see which students’ photo I used, and whose name gets printed in the paper.  One student excitedly shouted “we’re going to be famous!!” So here goes:Grade 3 student Ruth Garcia said that “It’s so much fun to hear stories about other people because we get to learn new things.” Hailey Webb (in the same class) told me that “everybody is different and we got to hear a lot of cool things that people do for their job.”Grade 1 teacher Mme. Labelle told me that she “loves the Human Library. We are learning so much about people in our community”.“The kids were super engaged and learned a lot!” said Grade 4 teacher Kyle Donnelly.Grade 2/3 teacher Darlene Kopys-Larocque said “it was great. Both the students and I enjoyed it. Students asked questions and learned a lot about the different human books that we got to take out. We wanted to take out more!”“When it was all over there was one complaint that I heard over and over... that it was too short,” Paul said.  She is hoping that next year they will be able to stretch the Human Library to three periods (instead of two) so that classrooms can hear from more “books”.I would like to thank the students and staff at Sun Valley School for their help and thank Cathy Paul for the invitation to be a book. I agree with Grade 2 teacher Kelly Waite, — this was “an excellent experience for all involved.” Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

I had the most wonderful morning at Sun Valley School last month, being a ‘book’ in their Human Library.

As part of I Love to Read month, teacher-librarian Cathy Paul arranged fun reading activities for the students of this kindergarten to Grade 5 school.

Students had the opportunity to choose from a selection of 23 human ‘library books’ that included athletes, a musician, a lawyer, a fire fighter, an ecologist, artist, an MLA, a school trustee, historians and a railway mechanic. There were specialists in technology, food, prosthetics, pets and medical laboratories; an RCAF sergeant, and a community columnist from The Herald.

Friday, Mar. 20, 2020

Herald
Correspondent Wendy Hrynkiw is pictured with Mme. Sanchez’s Grade 2 class at Sun Valley School. (A special thank you goes out to Tiago Azevedo who had to make the tough choice between taking the photo or being in the photo.)

Aiming for a bullseye in Las Vegas

Wendy Hrynkiw 4 minute read Preview

Aiming for a bullseye in Las Vegas

Wendy Hrynkiw 4 minute read Friday, Feb. 21, 2020

The National Dart Association’s (NDA) 35th annual team dart tournament will be held at The Westgate Las Vegas Resort and Casino, from April 2 to 8, and East Kildonan’s Kirk Scott and his team, called the Central Assassins, will be there.  Scott and his team play in the Aactive Dart League on Tuesday nights at Rookies Sports Bar in the Central Hotel. After recently winning the intermediate division in league play, they will represent Winnipeg in the world’s largest international soft-tip dart tournament competition.“It was a last minute decision to join the team this year”, Scott says. “I wasn’t going to play due to my work schedule.”  Scott’s friend, teammate (and Transcona resident) Jeff Harrap encouraged him, and the league matched them with Ingrid Wintonyk and Bobbie Haines, two women also looking for a team.  “Our team was thrown together last-minute but it worked out great. I really enjoy the people on the team, and I hope we can spend many more years together playing a game we all love.”In Vegas, the foursome will be participating in two different tournaments — 01 games and cricket. Harrap and Scott will also compete in doubles, so they will have a very busy week This will be Scott’s second appearance at the tournament. He has been playing darts for 20 years and in 2011, while playing with a different team, his foursome was ranked fourth in the world at this event.  Attending this time around will be a different experience, however.“I’m most excited about being there with my wife as she experiences Vegas for the first time,” he says.Scott adds that “I always look forward to meeting new people from all around the world at this event.”  Good luck to the Central Assassins!Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

The National Dart Association’s (NDA) 35th annual team dart tournament will be held at The Westgate Las Vegas Resort and Casino, from April 2 to 8, and East Kildonan’s Kirk Scott and his team, called the Central Assassins, will be there.  

Scott and his team play in the Aactive Dart League on Tuesday nights at Rookies Sports Bar in the Central Hotel. After recently winning the intermediate division in league play, they will represent Winnipeg in the world’s largest international soft-tip dart tournament competition.

“It was a last minute decision to join the team this year”, Scott says. “I wasn’t going to play due to my work schedule.”  

Friday, Feb. 21, 2020

Herald
(From left) Ingrid Wintonyk, Kirk Scott, Bobbie Haines and Jeff Harrap, collectively known as the Central Assassins, celebrate on the night they won their soft-tip darts league to qualify for the NDA team dart tournament in Las Vegas in April.

(Photo provided by Kirk Scott)
Taken on the night of their win in Winnipeg, a win that sends them to Vegas to compete.

Create your own ‘paint night’ at home

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Create your own ‘paint night’ at home

Wendy Hrynkiw 5 minute read Thursday, Jan. 30, 2020

Inspired by an outing with a girlfriend, we have created our own version of ‘paint night’ at home in my basement.  A smart TV is required for this.Because most paint night functions are held in bar settings, my (then) 16-year-old daughter was disappointed that she couldn’t join in. Therefore, we were inspired to createour own — and it turns out that it’s way more fun to do it at home.  Here’s how we do ours, with all supplies purchased at dollar stores:Shopping list:• Canvas;• Paint brushes;• Acrylic paint;• Plastic beer-type cups (for paint water);• Styrofoam plates (for paint palettes);• Plastic table cloths;• Roll of paper towels.The first thing I do is to lay a large drop cloth on the basement carpet. I set up two or three folding tables, and put the plastic table cloths on top. I use a few Rubbermaid bins to prop up the canvases. Then I invite mycrafty and non-crafty friends, ask them each to bring a beverage and a snack to share. We usually have wine, chips, chocolate and that one friend who brings vegetables.We go to our favourite tutorial painting website, The Art Sherpa, and choose a video.  We have agreed upon our painting ahead of time so that I know which paint colours to purchase. We love Cinnamon Cooney (The Art Sherpa). She is funny, and her videos are very easy to follow and achieve, with little or no talent.  For the more detailed paintings, she provides a traceable that you can print ahead of time, and you can trace it with some good old-fashioned carbon paper.  I always trace mine, and the artsy people in our group draw theirs freehand.The Art Sherpa’s videos come with a “hoot rating.” One hoot is easy, two hoots is medium, three hoots is hard and will never be achieved by me or most of my friends (except that one — she knows who she is — and she’s the one who brings the vegetables, too).Honestly, you can do this. You can plan a fun night with your friends right at home, for under $10per person. We have a hoot… pun intended!(And for heaven’s sake, don’t drink the paint water!)Wendy Hrynkiw is a community correspondent for East Kildonan. Email her at wendyhrynkiw@shaw.ca

Inspired by an outing with a girlfriend, we have created our own version of ‘paint night’ at home in my basement. A smart TV is required for this.

Because most paint night functions are held in bar settings, my (then) 16-year-old daughter was disappointed that she couldn’t join in. Therefore, we were inspired to create our own — and it turns out that it’s way more fun to do it at home.  

Here’s how we do ours, with all supplies purchased at dollar stores:

Thursday, Jan. 30, 2020

Herald
It’s fairly easy and inexpensive to create your own paint night with friends and family in the comfort of your own home.