A different way to shop

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This article was published 18/12/2021 (245 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

At this time of the year, people are busy buying gifts for friends and family. While many people shop at stores that sell new clothes, games, and toys, others might choose to help reduce waste while saving money. At the Kildonan MCC Thrift Shop on Chalmers Avenue, shoppers have a chance to buy in a way that helps to make a good use of resources.
People look forward to different aspects of November and December, depending on their viewpoints. For some people, Black Friday and Cyber Monday are highlights of the season, with the chance to buy all kinds of goods at bargain prices. Others might prefer to celebrate Buy Nothing Day and Giving Tuesday, with their emphasis on the responsible use of resources and care for people in need. 
Looking for gifts or items for daily use at a thrift shop is one way of combining the two different sides of the season. According to the Mennonite Central Committee thrift shop’s website, one of the challenges for shoppers is to “commit to help reduce textile waste by checking out a thrift shop before you look at any new clothing for the rest of the year.” 
Besides the clothes are the second-hand dishes, books and, occasionally, even a bicycle or two.
The thrift shop on Chalmers is part of MCC’s work in helping communities throughout Winnipeg and other parts of Manitoba. People donate their used items to the store, and volunteers sort through them and arrange them. When shoppers buy these items, the proceeds go to a number of organizations, including the Chalmers Community Resource Centre, Elmwood High School,and Siloam Mission. Meanwhile, people make good use of the resources they have.
According to the Thrift World website, clothes were once expensive items that people patched and kept as long as possible. However, that changed with the Industrial Revolution, when clothes became cheap and easy to produce. As the cost of buying clothes decreased, textile waste increased. 
According to the Textile Waste in Canada website, North Americans throw away ten million tonnes of clothing every year. Thrift shops can help give clothes books, dishes, and jewelry new homes. With the added benefit of supporting many important local organizations such as the Elmwood East Kildonan Active Living Centre, shopping at the Kildonan MCC Thrift Shop is a good choice.      
Susan Huebert is a community correspondent for Elmwood. 

At this time of the year, people are busy buying gifts for friends and family. While many people shop at stores that sell new clothes, games, and toys, others might choose to help reduce waste while saving money. At the Kildonan MCC Thrift Shop on Chalmers Avenue, shoppers have a chance to buy in a way that helps to make a good use of resources.

People look forward to different aspects of November and December, depending on their viewpoints. For some people, Black Friday and Cyber Monday are highlights of the season, with the chance to buy all kinds of goods at bargain prices. Others might prefer to celebrate Buy Nothing Day and Giving Tuesday, with their emphasis on the responsible use of resources and care for people in need. 

Canstar file photo The Kildonan MCC Thrift Shop offers people a chance to shop responsibly and inexpensively.

Looking for gifts or items for daily use at a thrift shop is one way of combining the two different sides of the season. According to the Mennonite Central Committee thrift shop’s website, one of the challenges for shoppers is to “commit to help reduce textile waste by checking out a thrift shop before you look at any new clothing for the rest of the year.” 

Besides the clothes are the second-hand dishes, books and, occasionally, even a bicycle or two.

The thrift shop on Chalmers is part of MCC’s work in helping communities throughout Winnipeg and other parts of Manitoba. People donate their used items to the store, and volunteers sort through them and arrange them. When shoppers buy these items, the proceeds go to a number of organizations, including the Chalmers Community Resource Centre, Elmwood High School,and Siloam Mission. Meanwhile, people make good use of the resources they have.

According to the Thrift World website, clothes were once expensive items that people patched and kept as long as possible. However, that changed with the Industrial Revolution, when clothes became cheap and easy to produce. As the cost of buying clothes decreased, textile waste increased. 

According to the Textile Waste in Canada website, North Americans throw away ten million tonnes of clothing every year. Thrift shops can help give clothes books, dishes, and jewelry new homes. With the added benefit of supporting many important local organizations such as the Elmwood East Kildonan Active Living Centre, shopping at the Kildonan MCC Thrift Shop is a good choice.      

Susan Huebert is a community correspondent for Elmwood. 

Susan Huebert

Susan Huebert
Elmwood community correspondent

Susan Huebert is a community correspondent for Elmwood

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