More than just a jam band

Local group the Gerry Hatricks giving back to community

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This article was published 04/01/2019 (1432 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

This holiday season, a local band of musicians learned that it doesn’t take a lot to spread good cheer.
On Dec. 22, the Gerry Hatricks delivered 100 peanut butter and jam sandwiches to the Main Street Project.
“That was an eye opener,” Gerrit Delaquis, guitar player and vocalist for the East Kildonan-based group, said. “I’m still learning about the services they provide, but I know they feed between 300 and 500 people there. At the end of the day, our sandwiches were really appreciated.”
The band, which officially formed in September, has been recording an album for release later this year. While they were recording a video for their tune PB Jam, the group felt they should do something to give back to the community.
“Part of the props were a lot of peanut butter and jam sandwiches,” Delaquis said. “A lot of those went to waste, and we felt kind of bad about that. But to try to make up for it, we went out and got a whole bunch more fresh ingredients, and made a little over 100 peanut butter and jam sandwiches and brought them over to Main Street Project.”
The experience was so positive, Delaquis said the group hopes to turn it into an annual tradition.
“Maybe we can make 1,000 next year, or something hot,” he said. “Peanut butter and jam is just the starting point. We’ll do what we can.”
Delaquis described the Gerry Hatricks as an eclectic, “folksy” band with “little bit of punk influence.” And while the band is relatively new, Delaquis, vocalist/percussionist Kelsey Halldorson, bass player Kyle Halldorson, and Cory Olivier have been jamming together and playing music since high school at River East Collegiate or earlier.
“We’ve all been in and out of other projects,” he said.
PB Jam will be online soon, Delaquis said. He described the song itself as “kind of silly, but there’s pain behind it too.”
“It’s about when someone important to you leaves town to go do whatever it is they’re going to do, but you’re back at home, hoping they’re OK, hoping they come back.”
The Gerry Hatricks next gig is at the Times Change(d) High and Lonesome Club (234 Main St.) on Jan. 10 with Two Crows For Comfort and Campfire Sigh. 

This holiday season, a local band of musicians learned that it doesn’t take a lot to spread good cheer.

On Dec. 22, the Gerry Hatricks delivered 100 peanut butter and jam sandwiches to the Main Street Project.

Supplied photo East Kildonan-based band The Gerry Hatricks recently donated 100 peanut butter and jam sandwiches to Main Street Project. Guitarist/vocalist Gerrit Delaquis said he hopes that the act was the start of an annual tradition. Pictured, from left: Delaquis, vocalist/percussionist Kelsey Halldorson, bassist Kyle Halldorson, and drummer Cory Olivier.

“That was an eye opener,” Gerrit Delaquis, guitar player and vocalist for the East Kildonan-based group, said. “I’m still learning about the services they provide, but I know they feed between 300 and 500 people there. At the end of the day, our sandwiches were really appreciated.”

The band, which officially formed in September, has been recording an album for release later this year. While they were recording a video for their tune PB Jam, the group felt they should do something to give back to the community.

“Part of the props were a lot of peanut butter and jam sandwiches,” Delaquis said. “A lot of those went to waste, and we felt kind of bad about that. But to try to make up for it, we went out and got a whole bunch more fresh ingredients, and made a little over 100 peanut butter and jam sandwiches and brought them over to Main Street Project.”

The experience was so positive, Delaquis said the group hopes to turn it into an annual tradition.

“Maybe we can make 1,000 next year, or something hot,” he said. “Peanut butter and jam is just the starting point. We’ll do what we can.”

Delaquis described the Gerry Hatricks as an eclectic, “folksy” band with “little bit of punk influence.” And while the band is relatively new, Delaquis, vocalist/percussionist Kelsey Halldorson, bass player Kyle Halldorson, and Cory Olivier have been jamming together and playing music since high school at River East Collegiate or earlier.

“We’ve all been in and out of other projects,” he said.PB Jam will be online soon, Delaquis said. He described the song itself as “kind of silly, but there’s pain behind it too.”

“It’s about when someone important to you leaves town to go do whatever it is they’re going to do, but you’re back at home, hoping they’re OK, hoping they come back.”

The Gerry Hatricks next gig is at the Times Change(d) High and Lonesome Club (234 Main St.) on Jan. 10 with Two Crows For Comfort and Campfire Sigh. 

Supplied photo During the making of the music video for their new single PB Jam, The Gerry Hatricks decided they should try to give back to the community. On Dec. 22, they donated 100 peanut butter and jam sandwiches to Main Street Project.
Sheldon Birnie

Sheldon Birnie
Community Journalist

Sheldon Birnie is a reporter/photographer for the Free Press Community Review. The author of Missing Like Teeth: An Oral History of Winnipeg Underground Rock (1990-2001), his writing has appeared in journals and online platforms across Canada, the U.S. and the U.K. A husband and father of two young children, Sheldon enjoys playing guitar and rec hockey when he can find the time. Email him at sheldon.birnie@canstarnews.com Call him at 204-697-7112

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