Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 3/10/2018 (956 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

 

Shawn Nason is running for city council for Transcona in the Oct. 24 civic election.
Nason, who has lived in Transcona with his wife for the past 15 years, has been involved in politics for over 10 years, working behind the scenes both federally and provincially. Until 2015, he was constituency manager for Transcona MP Lawrence Toet. 
"Through that I learned a lot about the needs of the community, on the local level," said Nason, who turns 50 later this year. "We accomplished a lot in the four years I was with him. We still had more to do, but we were waking the community up to opportunities for multi-level funding."
More recently, Nason worked as special assistant to the minister of Indigenous and northern relations and the minister of families before announcing his candidacy for city council earlier this year.
"In those roles, you have to work with various organizations, Association of Manitoba Municipalities, the City of Winnipeg, and the feds with regard to funding," Nason said. "But at the city level you’re working as part of a broader team. You focus directly on the community, and I feel that’s how I can do the most good for the community."
A member of the Rotary Club of Winnipeg Transcona and current basketball convener at Oxford Heights Community Centre, Nason and his wife have two young children. He said he decided to run for city council in part to help provide a healthy community for families to raise their kids in Transcona.
"I’m looking to reconstitute what was known as the Transcona Playground Renewal Association," he said. "I really want to make that a priority, to work with individuals who were leading that organization to complete the work they were doing up to 2016."
Transit is another issue Nason said he would focus on, if elected.
"We need reliable transit that’s accessible to everyone," he said. "If we can increase ridership, we can try to keep firm on pricing for same-day trips. We need to get people to say that the bus is a better option for going downtown to work. We need to make it an enjoyable experience, and put more buses on major routes."
While acknowledging that investment in infrastructure like a replacement for the Louise Bridge is vital, Nason added that if elected he would like to re-examine how truck routes are organized, particularly those running through residential areas.
"With proper consultations and transparency, those are the sort of things I think you can resolve," he said. "I’d talk with the development community, administration and residents to try to find a solution from the business community as to what their actual needs are."
Nason stressed that his campaign is committed to improving the local community.
"It’s a slogan ,but that’s what I feel," Nason said. "We have a jewel here in the city. With a bit of work, Transcona will be the place everyone else aspires to be."

Shawn Nason is running for city council for Transcona in the Oct. 24 civic election.

Shawn Nason is running for city council for Transcona in the Oct. 24 civic election. (SHELDON BIRNIE/CANSTAR/THE HERALD)

SHELDON BIRNIE

Shawn Nason is running for city council for Transcona in the Oct. 24 civic election. (SHELDON BIRNIE/CANSTAR/THE HERALD)

Nason, who has lived in Transcona with his wife for the past 15 years, has been involved in politics for over 10 years, working behind the scenes both federally and provincially. Until 2015, he was constituency manager for Transcona MP Lawrence Toet. 

"Through that I learned a lot about the needs of the community, on the local level," said Nason, who turns 50 later this year. "We accomplished a lot in the four years I was with him. We still had more to do, but we were waking the community up to opportunities for multi-level funding."

More recently, Nason worked as special assistant to the minister of Indigenous and northern relations and the minister of families before announcing his candidacy for city council earlier this year.

We have a jewel here in the city.

"In those roles, you have to work with various organizations, Association of Manitoba Municipalities, the City of Winnipeg, and the feds with regard to funding," Nason said. "But at the city level you’re working as part of a broader team. You focus directly on the community, and I feel that’s how I can do the most good for the community."

A member of the Rotary Club of Winnipeg East AM and current basketball convener at Oxford Heights Community Centre, Nason and his wife have two young children. He said he decided to run for city council in part to help provide a healthy community for families to raise their kids in Transcona.

"I’m looking to reconstitute what was known as the Transcona Playground Renewal Association," he said. "I really want to make that a priority, to work with individuals who were leading that organization to complete the work they were doing up to 2016."

Transit is another issue Nason said he would focus on, if elected.

"We need reliable transit that’s accessible to everyone," he said. "If we can increase ridership, we can try to keep firm on pricing for same-day trips. We need to get people to say that the bus is a better option for going downtown to work. We need to make it an enjoyable experience, and put more buses on major routes."

While acknowledging that investment in infrastructure like a replacement for the Louise Bridge is vital, Nason added that if elected he would like to re-examine how truck routes are organized, particularly those running through residential areas.

"With proper consultations and transparency, those are the sort of things I think you can resolve," he said. "I’d talk with the development community, administration and residents to try to find a solution from the business community as to what their actual needs are."

Nason stressed that his campaign is committed to improving the local community.

"It’s a slogan ,but that’s what I feel," Nason said. "We have a jewel here in the city. With a bit of work, Transcona will be the place everyone else aspires to be."

Sheldon Birnie

Sheldon Birnie
The Herald community journalist

Sheldon Birnie is the reporter/photographer for The Herald. The author of Missing Like Teeth: An Oral History of Winnipeg Underground Rock (1990-2001), his writing has appeared in journals and online platforms across Canada, the U.S. and the U.K. A husband and father of two young children, Sheldon enjoys playing guitar and rec hockey when he can find the time. Email him at sheldon.birnie@canstarnews.com Call him at 204-697-7112

   Read full biography