Fringe play in the vein of Hitchcock

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This article was published 17/07/2018 (1543 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Marc Moir promises his latest Fringe Festival production will entertain you and make you think — so much so you may want to see it twice. In fact, the playwright recommends it. 
See No Evil, which runs from July 18 to 28 at the West End Cultural Centre, is a classic Hitchcock-esque suspense thriller filled with charm and chills in equal measure. But unlike Moir’s previous Fringe productions, See No Evil is set up as a radio play, where lines are read into a mic onstage and the cast uses an assortment of props to help tell the story. 
“It’s an homage to that golden era when radio was TV,” Moir said. “People may want to see it once to watch the play, and another time to close their eyes and just listen and let their imagination take over.”
Without giving too much away, the story starts with  Russell and Mary celebrating their anniversary with good friends, Charles and Victoria. The celebration ends with Russell, a psychiatrist, telling Mary he’s going to murder her within 48 hours. Mary turns to Charles, a police officer, and Victoria, a mystery buff, for help. But does anyone believe her?   
The title is a nod to the set of ceramic monkeys we’ve all seen: see no evil, hear no evil, do no evil; and Moir said it’s a comment on society. 
“So often in our world, we see evil and people will turn a blind eye and choose not to see it,” he says. “We are responsible for each other. When there are real evils, we need to address it.”
The 33-year-old thespian is no stranger to the Fringe, or the theatre for that matter, having been involved with about 53 productions as a writer and actor combined. He gained attention with Padre X, a true story about a Canadian chaplain in the Second World War who sacrificed his own freedom. He surrendered to the Germans and subsequently became a prisoner of war for three years, just so he could continue to care for and minister to other PoWs 
As a former youth pastor, Moir has a lot of inspiration to draw from. The ideas come from anywhere and at any time, which is why he carries a journal filled with future character names, plots and clever dialogue to capture them before they’re gone. 
His love of the arts started early. He grew up in Wolseley in a household where storytelling and good writing was important. Creativity seems to be part of the Moir DNA – both his parents, Garry and Agatha, are accomplished CBC radio personalities, and his brother Scot, is in See No Evil. The cast is completed with Moir’s sister-in-law Laura (who also wrote the score) and Moir’s wife, Jenna, who’s new to the acting business. 
“As I was casting an actress for the part of Victoria, my wife said ‘If you can’t find anybody, I’ll do it.’ You could have knocked me over with a feather,” Moir said. “She has been phenomenal. The entire cast has been wonderful.”

Marc Moir promises his latest Fringe Festival production will entertain you and make you think — so much so you may want to see it twice. In fact, the playwright recommends it. 

See No Evil, which runs from July 18 to 28 at the West End Cultural Centre, is a classic Hitchcock-esque suspense thriller filled with charm and chills in equal measure. But unlike Moir’s previous Fringe productions, See No Evil is set up as a radio play, where lines are read into a mic onstage and the cast uses an assortment of props to help tell the story. 

Marc Moir’s new production, See No Evil, runs during the Winnipeg Fringe Festival from July 18 to 28 at the West End Cultural Centre.

“It’s an homage to that golden era when radio was TV,” Moir said. “People may want to see it once to watch the play, and another time to close their eyes and just listen and let their imagination take over.”

Without giving too much away, the story starts with Russell and Mary celebrating their anniversary with good friends, Charles and Victoria. The celebration ends with Russell, a psychiatrist, telling Mary he’s going to murder her within 48 hours. Mary turns to Charles, a police officer, and Victoria, a mystery buff, for help. But does anyone believe her?

The title is a nod to the set of ceramic monkeys we’ve all seen: see no evil, hear no evil, do no evil; and Moir said it’s a comment on society. 

“So often in our world, we see evil and people will turn a blind eye and choose not to see it,” he says. “We are responsible for each other. When there are real evils, we need to address it.”

The 33-year-old thespian is no stranger to the Fringe, or the theatre for that matter, having been involved with about 53 productions as a writer and actor combined. He gained attention with Padre X, a true story about a Canadian chaplain in the Second World War who sacrificed his own freedom. He surrendered to the Germans and subsequently became a prisoner of war for three years, just so he could continue to care for and minister to other PoWs.

As a former youth pastor, Moir has a lot of inspiration to draw from. The ideas come from anywhere and at any time, which is why he carries a journal filled with future character names, plots and clever dialogue to capture them before they’re gone. 

His love of the arts started early. He grew up in Wolseley in a household where storytelling and good writing was important. Creativity seems to be part of the Moir DNA – both his parents, Garry and Agatha, are accomplished CBC radio personalities, and his brother Scot, is in See No Evil. The cast is completed with Moir’s sister-in-law Laura (who also wrote the score) and Moir’s wife, Jenna, who’s new to the acting business. 

“As I was casting an actress for the part of Victoria, my wife said ‘If you can’t find anybody, I’ll do it.’ You could have knocked me over with a feather,” Moir said. “She has been phenomenal. The entire cast has been wonderful.”

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