The Times

Northwest Winnipeg’s 2021 sports year in review

Cody Sellar 6 minute read Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

Sports in Manitoba were on hold when 2021 arrived. Some sports had tried to get started in the previous fall, but as COVID-19 numbers rose, leagues eventually cancelled their seasons.

Return to play

In September, high school sports made their long-awaited return, but with modified policies to try to limit the spread of COVID-19.

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Northwest Winnipeg’s 2021 year in review

19 minute read Preview

Northwest Winnipeg’s 2021 year in review

19 minute read Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

As 2021 comes to a close, we look back on a year of stories in northwest Winnipeg.

January: Skaters embrace outdoor rinks

As the ongoing pandemic and consequent public health orders continued to limit people’s options for recreation, people turned to outdoor activities. During a Winnipeg winter, that often means skating.

With the province having green-lighted the opening of outdoor rinks the month prior, in January skaters took to outdoor rinks in droves.

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Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

Photo by Cody Sellar
On Sept. 30, thousands of people gathered at St. John’s Park to commemorate the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

Full-day kindergarten would benefit Manitobans

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Preview

Full-day kindergarten would benefit Manitobans

Malaya Marcelino 3 minute read Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

The Winnipeg School Division recently announced that it would cut its full-day kindergarten pilot program which has been running in 11 of its schools for several years.

The reason given was that, while the program found that children benefited at the beginning of Grade 1, students in the half-day kindergarten program are catching up by the end of Grade 2.

However, the program did not study the economic or social benefits of full-day kindergarten, of which there are many. For example, Manitoba has a huge child-care deficit, and many parents struggle with the logistics of getting kids to a short half day of kindergarten and then to daycare placements, if they are available. Inadequate child care and educational opportunities hurt the workforce and women in particular, an issue which has been exacerbated during this pandemic. This can affect awhole family’s social and economic wellbeing, not just the child’s school academic readiness.

Full-day kindergarten is actually quite common in other Canadian provinces. In eight out of 13 provinces and territories, full-day kindergarten is widely available or even the norm. In Alberta, studies have shown that disadvantaged students benefit greatly from full-day kindergarten, which helped narrow the gap between them and other students. There are so many reasons why Manitoba should make full-day kindergarten more widely available, and it is time for the Progressive Conservative government to invest seriously in our children and families by helping them to have the best possible academic and economic outcomes.

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Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

The Winnipeg School Division recently announced that it would cut its full-day kindergarten pilot program which has been running in 11 of its schools for several years.

The reason given was that, while the program found that children benefited at the beginning of Grade 1, students in the half-day kindergarten program are catching up by the end of Grade 2.

However, the program did not study the economic or social benefits of full-day kindergarten, of which there are many. For example, Manitoba has a huge child-care deficit, and many parents struggle with the logistics of getting kids to a short half day of kindergarten and then to daycare placements, if they are available. Inadequate child care and educational opportunities hurt the workforce and women in particular, an issue which has been exacerbated during this pandemic. This can affect awhole family’s social and economic wellbeing, not just the child’s school academic readiness.

Full-day kindergarten is actually quite common in other Canadian provinces. In eight out of 13 provinces and territories, full-day kindergarten is widely available or even the norm. In Alberta, studies have shown that disadvantaged students benefit greatly from full-day kindergarten, which helped narrow the gap between them and other students. There are so many reasons why Manitoba should make full-day kindergarten more widely available, and it is time for the Progressive Conservative government to invest seriously in our children and families by helping them to have the best possible academic and economic outcomes.

More of the same from Stefanson government

Nahanni Fontaine 3 minute read Preview

More of the same from Stefanson government

Nahanni Fontaine 3 minute read Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

Last month, we held an abbreviated session in the Manitoba Legislative Assembly. This session, however, was a historic sitting as the first woman premier in Manitoba’s history — Heather Stefanson — was sworn in to office.

Once again, congratulations to the new premier.

Sadly, we quickly saw just how similar Premier Stefanson is to the former premier, her mentor Brian Pallister. Throughout the session, I watched the new premier dodge question after question about what her government plans to do to mitigate the fourth wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. I watched as Premier Stefanson steadfastly refused to implement a vaccine mandate for personal care home staff, thus putting our seniors and elders at risk.

But the clearest example of how the Stefanson government is little more than a repeat of Pallister’s came on the first day of the session in her government’s first speech from the throne. Unfortunately,the throne speech failed to address many of the urgent and critical issues faced by Manitoba families, such as the rising cost of living and health-care cuts, including cuts made while Premier Stefanson was health minister.

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Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

Last month, we held an abbreviated session in the Manitoba Legislative Assembly. This session, however, was a historic sitting as the first woman premier in Manitoba’s history — Heather Stefanson — was sworn in to office.

Once again, congratulations to the new premier.

Sadly, we quickly saw just how similar Premier Stefanson is to the former premier, her mentor Brian Pallister. Throughout the session, I watched the new premier dodge question after question about what her government plans to do to mitigate the fourth wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. I watched as Premier Stefanson steadfastly refused to implement a vaccine mandate for personal care home staff, thus putting our seniors and elders at risk.

But the clearest example of how the Stefanson government is little more than a repeat of Pallister’s came on the first day of the session in her government’s first speech from the throne. Unfortunately,the throne speech failed to address many of the urgent and critical issues faced by Manitoba families, such as the rising cost of living and health-care cuts, including cuts made while Premier Stefanson was health minister.

Appreciating our health-care workers

Cindy Lamoureux 3 minute read Preview

Appreciating our health-care workers

Cindy Lamoureux 3 minute read Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

Our health-care system is essential to a functioning province and that is why our health-care workers deserve to be treated fairly and with the utmost respect. Furthermore, they deserve to be properly thanked and acknowledged for the work they have been doing and continue to do to keep Manitobans safe and healthy.

For nearly two years now, amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, people working in our health-care system have been forced to work long shifts, put themselves in vulnerable situations and sacrificed so much of their own lives. They workers have given time, put themselves at greater health risks and sacrificed not being at home with their families as much. We all need to be concerned that our health-care workers are not overcome by pandemic fatigue.

I believe that sometimes it can be easy for us to take our health-care system for granted. Many of us who were born and raised here in Canada have never feared not being able to access health-care resources. Today that is changing — just look at the growing number of procedures being delayed because of COVID. The pandemic means our resources are sparse, and we all need to do our part in this pandemic by trying our best not to spread the virus. Being fully vaccinated and getting a booster shot is important — but we can still do more.

With the emergence of the Omicron variant, it is important that we prevent our hospitals from becoming overrun and having to send patients out of province. This means we must be careful and continue to follow public health orders, even though I know we are so tired from the past two years.

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Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

Our health-care system is essential to a functioning province and that is why our health-care workers deserve to be treated fairly and with the utmost respect. Furthermore, they deserve to be properly thanked and acknowledged for the work they have been doing and continue to do to keep Manitobans safe and healthy.

For nearly two years now, amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, people working in our health-care system have been forced to work long shifts, put themselves in vulnerable situations and sacrificed so much of their own lives. They workers have given time, put themselves at greater health risks and sacrificed not being at home with their families as much. We all need to be concerned that our health-care workers are not overcome by pandemic fatigue.

I believe that sometimes it can be easy for us to take our health-care system for granted. Many of us who were born and raised here in Canada have never feared not being able to access health-care resources. Today that is changing — just look at the growing number of procedures being delayed because of COVID. The pandemic means our resources are sparse, and we all need to do our part in this pandemic by trying our best not to spread the virus. Being fully vaccinated and getting a booster shot is important — but we can still do more.

With the emergence of the Omicron variant, it is important that we prevent our hospitals from becoming overrun and having to send patients out of province. This means we must be careful and continue to follow public health orders, even though I know we are so tired from the past two years.

Mmm, mmm… tourtière

Cheryl Girard 3 minute read Preview

Mmm, mmm… tourtière

Cheryl Girard 3 minute read Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

This is going to be a difficult holiday season for us for many reasons. And I think it will be hard for many others.

So here is something different. A recipe from our home to yours. Even if you’re spending the holiday alone you can try to make this and hopefully enjoy the traditional aromas and flavours of this splendid dish.

My husband is French-Canadian and when he was growing up in rural Manitoba one of his family’s traditions was to have tourtière and bouillon at réveillon (the Christmas feast) on Christmas Eve after they went to midnight mass.

When the kids got home from mass, each was allowed to open one gift from Père Noël. There would also be Japanese oranges and all kinds of nuts that you would have to crack open with a nutcracker.

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Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021

Dreamstime.com
Alone this Christmas, or maybe a little down because we’re still living with public health restrictions? Try lifting your spirits with by making a traditional French-Canadian tourtière.

Canstar Community News Weekly Video Update for Dec. 22, 2021

John Kendle 1 minute read Preview

Canstar Community News Weekly Video Update for Dec. 22, 2021

John Kendle 1 minute read Wednesday, Dec. 22, 2021

Canstar managing editor John Kendle chats with Cody Sellar, reporter for The Times, about stories in the Dec. 22 issue of the paper, as well as what's coming up on Dec. 29.

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Wednesday, Dec. 22, 2021

Sscope, residents on the brink of losing home

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Preview

Sscope, residents on the brink of losing home

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

The window is closing for Sscope, and that means the doors of the non-profit organization may soon be closing, too.

The organization assists people living with mental illness by providing them work in one of their social enterprises and by offering safe and stable housing. Its name is an acronym for ‘Self-Starting Creative Opportunities for People in Employment.’

There are 46 people who live in dorm-style housing in the former Neechi Foods building at 865 Main St., and another 40 who use Sscope’s overnight shelter.

But after the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation denied the organization’s Rapid Housing Initiative funding request, Sscope has asked for $500,000 from each of the three levels of government to put a down payment on the building, which it has been leasing. If it does not receive the money by Jan. 6, the organization will have to move.

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Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Photo by Cody Sellar
Frank Ribaric, who works and lives at the Sscope building, says he's worried about the impending loss of the building.

Indigenous-led non-profit closer to expansion

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Preview

Indigenous-led non-profit closer to expansion

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Ka Ni Kanichihk is one step closer to realizing their vision to expand their building at 455 McDermot Ave. The organization will receive a major capital grant of $200,000 from the Winnipeg Foundation to help make this happen.

Executive director Dodie Jordaan said the grant will take a bite out of the overall costs of the expansion, but it may help in a different way, as well.

“It’s incredibly important because one of the things we learned as we started fundraising is those who utilize our services and supports know us well. But we realized there’s a large portion of the giving community who doesn’t know Ka Ni Kanichihk and doesn’t know many Indigenous organizations,” she said.

Being put on the charitable map may help attract more donors in the future, but Jordaan said the organization must keep making the effort to let Winnipeg know the value of its services.

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Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Supplied photo
An artist's rendering of the expansion at Ka Ni Kanichihk shows the vision for the new centre.

Student sport faces uncertain future

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Preview

Student sport faces uncertain future

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

With the Christmas break at hand, Chad Falk, executive director at the Manitoba High Schools Athletic Association took a moment to assess the first few months of high school sports.

“It’s been an interesting fall and early winter,” he said. “We kind of started the school year in a very hesitant way, not really knowing what could be done. There were still quite a few restrictions in place that were preventing us from hosting provincials at that time.”

But high schools were able to go ahead with tournaments and exhibition play, allowing student athletes who’d been raring to play after COVID-19 cancelled most of last year’s sports to get back into the fray.

With easing of restrictions in October, the association started gearing up to get the first of the provincial tournaments in order. The volleyball championships wrapped up on Dec. 5.

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Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Supplied photo
While high school sports have been running smoothly to this point, Manitoba High School Athletics Association executive director Chad Falk says he's keeping a keen eye on COVID-19 cases and public health orders.

Take a sip of a sandwich

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Preview

Take a sip of a sandwich

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Some like their vodka with a twist of lime, others like it tasting of french fries and Kewpie mayo. Of course, the latter is a relatively small group of people who’ve indulged in the wild new menu at distillery Patent 5’s cocktail bar.

From now into the new year, the bar has transformed itself into “the world’s strangest diner.” Menu items include chips and guacamole, pineapple pizza and pastrami on rye. Those wouldn’t be too strange (although, the pineapple pizza may spark its usual debate), except for the fact that none are actually food. They are cocktails, flush with house-made tequilas, vodkas, bourbons and gins.

The “chicken and waffles,” for example, is a Patent 5 barrel-aged gin, fat washed with duck fat, infused with waffles, and mixed with maple syrup, butter and Frank’s RedHot.

“A lot of our menus, they’re pretty adventurous,” said Callan Anderson, bartender and occasional maker of understatements.

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Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Photo by Cody Sellar
Bartender Callan Anderson and colleagues let their imaginations run wild with their new "Patent 5 Diner" menu.

West St. Paul residents chafed over access point

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Preview

West St. Paul residents chafed over access point

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Some West St. Paul residents are up in arms about the province’s planned removal of two access points to their community from the north Perimeter Highway.

Those are the east and west access roads to Holmes Road, which leads into West St. Paul. The east access has already been closed and the west access will be removed by 2025. The project is a part of the province’s plan to turn the Perimeter Highways into an access-controlled freeway.

One reason the province cites for the changes is improved safety, but West St. Paul resident Mike Yosyk thinks that’s simply a tool the province is using to push through its agenda.

“That was probably one of the main things that we, as residents, raised. We said, ‘listen, if an emergency vehicle needs to get to our developments, or to the school for a kid, you just knocked out the most direct points of access, period,’” he said.

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Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

File photo by Sydney Hildebrandt
The east access to Holmes Road, which leads into Dasmesh School and residences of West St. Paul, has been closed as part of an overhaul of the north Perimeter Highway.

Building our capacity to develop EVs

Kevin Lamoureux 3 minute read Preview

Building our capacity to develop EVs

Kevin Lamoureux 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Winnipeg’s taxi industry was well ahead of everyone else, in my opinion, when it came to transitioning from gas vehicles to electric vehicles. 

Well over 10 years ago taxi owners all over the world, and here in Winnipeg, were purchasing hybrids such as the Toyota Prius whereas the population as a whole was holding back, primarily due to the cost of hybrid vehicles. In Manitoba, we have seen both federal and provincial governments create programs to encourage consumers to purchase electric and hybrid vehicles. I suspect that will continue but it is consumer demand accompanied by a higher sense of environmental awareness that will ultimately make such vehicles more affordable.

Aside from fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, the world is also facing the threat of man-made climate change. The amount of greenhouse gases generated worldwide is affecting our climate, creating destructive weather events such as the ‘atmospheric river’ that caused catastrophic flooding and infrastructure damage in British Columbia. Considering all this, the federal government has strived to cut pollution from all sectors of the economy — including the transportation sector, which is one of the largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada. Almost half these emissions come from cars and light trucks.

One way to reduce the amount of transportation-related GHG emissions is to put more electric vehicles on the road. Since 2015, the federal government has invested a historic $1 billion to make EVs more affordable and accessible for Canadians. These investments are building a coast-to-coast network of fast chargers, installing chargers in local areas where Canadians live, work and play, and providing rebates of up to $5,000 to help more Canadians buy EVs.

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Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Dreamstime.com
Supplied photo
The Toyota Prius hybrid, such as this one in Paris, has been the workhorse vehicle of taxi fleets all over the world.

Continuing the call for better health care

Mintu Sandhu 4 minute read Preview

Continuing the call for better health care

Mintu Sandhu 4 minute read Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

With 2021 coming to and end, my colleagues and I recognize that this has been another difficult year for all Manitobans. Every family in Manitoba has been affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in some form.

The commitments and sacrifices made by Manitobans, both during the holidays and throughout the year, are helping save lives and preparing us for a strong recovery in 2022.

Sadly though, the Pallister-Stefanson governments keep missing the mark throughout the pandemic — making life harder for you. We are now in the fourth wave of this pandemic and Manitobans are still experiencing difficulties, especially in the health-care system.

Nursing vacancies have reached unprecedented levels in Manitoba — 2,000 vacancies province-wide. Doctors Manitoba estimates that our surgical and diagnostic backlog has grown to 152,000 cases. Manitobans have died while awaiting surgery and many are living with chronic conditions that greatly limit their mobility and quality of life. This is horrifying.

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Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

With 2021 coming to and end, my colleagues and I recognize that this has been another difficult year for all Manitobans. Every family in Manitoba has been affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in some form.

The commitments and sacrifices made by Manitobans, both during the holidays and throughout the year, are helping save lives and preparing us for a strong recovery in 2022.

Sadly though, the Pallister-Stefanson governments keep missing the mark throughout the pandemic — making life harder for you. We are now in the fourth wave of this pandemic and Manitobans are still experiencing difficulties, especially in the health-care system.

Nursing vacancies have reached unprecedented levels in Manitoba — 2,000 vacancies province-wide. Doctors Manitoba estimates that our surgical and diagnostic backlog has grown to 152,000 cases. Manitobans have died while awaiting surgery and many are living with chronic conditions that greatly limit their mobility and quality of life. This is horrifying.

A blessing in the North End

Freda Glow 3 minute read Preview

A blessing in the North End

Freda Glow 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Many changes in our health-care system have affected this end of town. Serious ambulance cases are directed to Health Sciences Centre. Other catastrophes, such as falls, broken bones and more, head to Seven Oaks Urgent Care.

 I was recently sent there by my doctor. He felt secure that they would solve my sudden problem. While I was awaiting the many tests they do on-site, I absorbed the rhythm of  the place and watched the ebb and flow of nurses, aides and doctors. I sensed a close-knit family that consults with each other to discuss and make important decisions. Having  dedicated their lives to healing, they seem happy to be fulfilling that challenge.

However, as I lay in bed and listened to the group gathered around the desk area, the  talk wasn’t always serious. A lot of joking and teasing went on. The easy everyday camaraderie is pleasant.

It makes life feel normal, although patients are hooked up to beeping machines, waiting for test results. They wonder whether they will be sent home with pills, selected for a more sophisticated treatment in the hospital upstairs or scheduled shortly for elective surgery.

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Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Mike Sudoma / Winnipeg Free Pres
A recent visit to Seven Oaks Urgent Care was an eye-opener for correspondent Freda Glow.

The day I ditched the heels

Hadass Eviatar 3 minute read Preview

The day I ditched the heels

Hadass Eviatar 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

It’s been a long pandemic, and I believe that between March 2020 and the beginning of November 2021, when my synagogue began cautious in-person services again on Saturday mornings, I had worn my high heels maybe once or twice. Not a lot of occasions to get dressed up, alas.

If you’ve never seen me in person, I’m short. So it’s not surprising that high-heeled shoes have been part of my outfit for many years, although thankfully never on a daily basis. I thought they were fun and pretty, made my legs look sexier, made me look taller and more imposing, etc. I wore them on any occasion that called for a nice dress. My feet hurt afterwards but, after all, we must “suffer to be beautiful”, right? That’s just how it is.

Like all of us, I’ve been on a journey for the past couple of years, and have been giving a lot of thought to the weighty questions of who I am and what I want to achieve in this world. With my 60th birthday fast approaching, the truth is I probably have less time ahead of me than behind me.

With this in mind, I have been choosing to abandon behaviours and choices that don’t bring me joy, to quote the great Marie Kondo.

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Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

It’s been a long pandemic, and I believe that between March 2020 and the beginning of November 2021, when my synagogue began cautious in-person services again on Saturday mornings, I had worn my high heels maybe once or twice. Not a lot of occasions to get dressed up, alas.

If you’ve never seen me in person, I’m short. So it’s not surprising that high-heeled shoes have been part of my outfit for many years, although thankfully never on a daily basis. I thought they were fun and pretty, made my legs look sexier, made me look taller and more imposing, etc. I wore them on any occasion that called for a nice dress. My feet hurt afterwards but, after all, we must “suffer to be beautiful”, right? That’s just how it is.

Like all of us, I’ve been on a journey for the past couple of years, and have been giving a lot of thought to the weighty questions of who I am and what I want to achieve in this world. With my 60th birthday fast approaching, the truth is I probably have less time ahead of me than behind me.

With this in mind, I have been choosing to abandon behaviours and choices that don’t bring me joy, to quote the great Marie Kondo.

Clauses collect for clawed companions

Cody Sellar 4 minute read Preview

Clauses collect for clawed companions

Cody Sellar 4 minute read Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Brad Wallace and Kris Kringle share the same barber, judging by the thick and snowy beards hanging from their chins. In fact, they’re quite identical in all aspects, as are Roxanne Wallace and Mrs. Claus. Brad and Roxanne Wallace both have the trademark apple cheeks, and both are very jolly.

The Wallaces were wearing the Clauses’ suits, presumably standing in for the rightful owners as they rested up for the next batch of kids. Both suits were of crimson felt trimmed with white faux fur and gold flourishes, all cinched in by broad black belts.

It seems the two couples have bonded over their doppelgängery because the Clauses have travelled south (or north from their vacation home on 34th Street) to take pictures with neighbourhood children outside the Wallaces’ home on McAdams Avenue in Garden City. The photos are free, but the Wallaces have put out a box for donations to the Winnipeg Humane Society’s Care to Adopt program.

“The reason we chose the humane society is people last year wanted to give us money. I said: ‘It’s OK. I enjoy doing this. You bring your kids, you take the pictures. You take all you want,’” Brad Wallace said.

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Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Photo by Cody Sellar
Brad and Roxanne Wallace are welcoming visitors to their front yard to take pictures with Santa and Mrs. Claus among lights and decorations, including a custom-built wooden sleigh. The two, who are ballroom dancers, grace a visitor with a waltz.

New Met School expands students’ options

Cody Sellar 4 minute read Preview

New Met School expands students’ options

Cody Sellar 4 minute read Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Seven Oaks School Division’s Met School was the first of its kind in Canada when it opened in 2012, and now the division is celebrating opening its third, which is located in the Exchange District.

The school opened in September, but chose to allow students and teachers to settle in before holding an official opening on Dec. 10, which will feature retired senator Murray Sinclair, who spearheaded the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Met Schools are different from regular schools due to four principles, said Will Burton, principal-teacher at the Exchange Met School.

“The first is that high school students are aligned with one teacher-advisor for the four years of their high school,” Burton said. “And there’s 15 students in one class that stay with one advisor from grade nine through to graduation.”

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Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Photo by Cody Sellar
Exchange Met School principal Will Burton shows off the students' learning space.

Local business need support now: MCC, local entrepreneur

Cody Sellar 6 minute read Preview

Local business need support now: MCC, local entrepreneur

Cody Sellar 6 minute read Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Local businesses are asking Winnipeggers to buy local, as the holiday season approaches after almost two years of economic hardships due to COVID-19 and subsequent restrictions.

For many businesses, Christmas sales make up a significant chunk of the year’s profits, and that’s certainly the case for a toy store.

“It’s anywhere from 50 to 60 per cent,” Toad Hall Toys owner Kari England said.

As Manitoba’s largest and oldest independent toy retailer, England’s company has joined the Manitoba Chamber of Commerce to encourage Winnipeg consumers to keep their dollars in the community.

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Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Photo by Cody Sellar
Toad Hall Toys owner Kari England says now is the time to support local businesses.

Garden City Fighting Gophers on a ‘heater’

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Preview

Garden City Fighting Gophers on a ‘heater’

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Ice makers, get ready to refreeze your rinks, because the women’s hockey team at Garden City Collegiate is on fire.

“It’s been a really great start. Being on a heater with girls that you really enjoy spending time with and you’ve created such a strong bond with is just really great. We’ve worked really hard as a team,” said Fighting Gophers assistant captain and winger Sammie Carvalho.

(Head coach Kyle Wheeler chimed in to joke: “As long as it’s a heater and not a bender!”)

Carvalho said the team has developed a strong bond on and off the ice, and she went as far as calling it a “sisterhood.”

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Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Supplied photo
The Garden City Collegiate Fighting Gophers celebrate a goal against the Collège Pierre-Elliott-Trudeau Canadiennes.

Light display open at Garden City Shopping Centre

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Preview

Light display open at Garden City Shopping Centre

Cody Sellar 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Lights of the North, an elaborate display of holiday lights geared for photos, is back — this time in Garden City Shopping Centre.

“It’s great to be back,” said Gary Malkowich, who helped manage the display’s set up. The company last set up the lights in 2019 at what was then The Bay building at 450 Portage Ave.

“I also think from the last time we’ve amped it up a bit from what people wanted and what we saw worked and what didn’t work,” Malkowich said. “We’re pumped.”

Inside the empty storefront where the display stands, a tunnel of golden lights greets visitors. There are many different things made of holiday lights — white arches with a giant snowflake hanging below, a horse and buggy that looks as though it grew from a fairy godmother’s pumpkin, a scene of palm trees at which Winnipeggers can take a moment to dream, and swinging columns that clink about as visitors walk through them.

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Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Photo by Cody Sellar
Marc Tinton explores the swinging light columns at the Lights of the North display.

Growing a movement of citizens

Steve Snyder 3 minute read Preview

Growing a movement of citizens

Steve Snyder 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

When I shared my article about my inspiration, Jane Jacobs, on social media I received a bit of pushback about my thoughts. I always love these criticisms as they can either strengthen my convictions or can help me grow and change. This one did a bit of both.

The criticism I received was regarding my opinion that ordinary citizens are the best people to tackle complex issues; people argued that at some point professionals are needed to do a proper job.

I agree. Professionals do have a place in the creation of community but many of the complex issues that our mature neighbourhoods are seeing can’t be solved by planners and engineers. It takes a grounded effort. Neighbourhoods function more like ecosystems where everything is connected intricately and in ways that can’t be captured by zoning codes, bylaw changes, or street design.

Great neighbourhoods are those in which citizens feel they are active participants; where they can make a difference. As much as planners would like it to be tures, they are not created by the best zoning codes.

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Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

When I shared my article about my inspiration, Jane Jacobs, on social media I received a bit of pushback about my thoughts. I always love these criticisms as they can either strengthen my convictions or can help me grow and change. This one did a bit of both.

The criticism I received was regarding my opinion that ordinary citizens are the best people to tackle complex issues; people argued that at some point professionals are needed to do a proper job.

I agree. Professionals do have a place in the creation of community but many of the complex issues that our mature neighbourhoods are seeing can’t be solved by planners and engineers. It takes a grounded effort. Neighbourhoods function more like ecosystems where everything is connected intricately and in ways that can’t be captured by zoning codes, bylaw changes, or street design.

Great neighbourhoods are those in which citizens feel they are active participants; where they can make a difference. As much as planners would like it to be tures, they are not created by the best zoning codes.

AIM aims to give back to the community

Derek Dabee 2 minute read Preview

AIM aims to give back to the community

Derek Dabee 2 minute read Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

On Dec. 4, the Association of Ilocanos of Manitoba (AIM) celebrated its 12th anniversary with a colourful Christmas party at Maples Community Centre.

It was a much smaller event than the regular Christmas gala in the Skyview Ballroom at the Marlborough Hotel. Usually the gala is the main fundraising event for AIM.

This year, the novel Christmas celebration was a super-fun picnic and dance.

Over 180 revellers — members and friends — attended the party which featured an all-night buffet of 15 courses and non-stop line dancing.

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Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Supplied photo
Members and directors of the Association of Ilocanos of Manitoba are pictured at the organization’s recent Christmas party.

Enjoy the season and remember to shop local

Jennifer Laferriere 3 minute read Preview

Enjoy the season and remember to shop local

Jennifer Laferriere 3 minute read Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Christmas is already looking very different than last year. Now that most people are double-vaccinated, getting together with loved ones shouldn’t be an issue, although we will have to watch our for the progression of the new omicron variant of the COVID-19 virus.

Still, even a small gathering will be something to celebrate.

Last year was such a difficult time for the holidays. Remember the limited shopping? No holiday decorations. We could only purchase necessities. Not this year., thought Stores are at full capacity and we are allowed to purchase all the fun Christmas items that we want.

Stores are getting busier as the days are counting down and they will only continue to get busier. I suggest shopping during the week if you get a chance. I know I like to avoid large crowds. It also makes the shopping experience more enjoyable.

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Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

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With this Christmas season being more open than that of 2020, remember to help support small businesses by shopping at local retailers.

Get your kids vaccinated against COVID-19

Uzoma Asagwara 2 minute read Preview

Get your kids vaccinated against COVID-19

Uzoma Asagwara 2 minute read Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

On Nov. 19, Health Canada officially approved COVID-19 vaccines for children between the ages of five and 11. Now,over 100,000 children aged 5 to 11 across Manitoba will finally have a chance to roll up their sleeves and get the protection they need from COVID-19.

Thousands of children in this age category have already received their first shots this month. I want to especially thank all the front-line workers at the vaccine clinics, from immunizers to navigators and everyone else, for their tireless work and efforts to get Manitobans vaccinated and the thoughtful ways in which the provide vaccines to our children.

I, along with health care professionals across our province and the world, encourage parents and caregiver families to make appointments as soon as possible. Families in Union Station want the best for their kids and can trust that the COVID-19 shots have been rigorously tested, are safe and are saving lives.

Right now, children under the age of 12 make up a third of COVID cases in Manitoba, and COVID is continuing to disrupt our children’s education. Manitoba declared as many COVID-19 outbreaks in schools within the first seven weeks of this school year as it did in all of the previous school year. That is why getting children vaccinated is so crucial. It will not just prevent kids from severe outcomes, but break up chains of transmission that we see in communities that lead to large outbreaks and school closures.

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Friday, Dec. 10, 2021

Photo by John Woods
Donovan Bullard, 11, received his first inoculation from Dr. Joss Reimer, Manitoba’s medical lead of vaccine implementation, at the Convention Centre in Winnipeg on Nov. 25. Manitoba children aged five to 11 are now eligible for pediatric vaccines.

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