Eva Wasney

Eva Wasney

Arts Reporter

Eva Wasney is an award-winning journalist who approaches every story with curiosity and care.

Eva was born in Winnipeg and graduated from the joint Creative Communications program at the University of Winnipeg and Red River College.

Her first job out of school was at the former Winnipeg Metro newspaper, a free daily where she got to play reporter-photographer and once ate roasted crickets for a story.

Her next adventure was in western Manitoba reporting for the Brandon Sun. While at the paper she covered everything from rodeos to doctor shortages to tornados to community musicals to First Nations economic development.

A highlight of her time at the Sun was completing a large multimedia project about five Second World War veterans who received a medal of honour from the French government for their contributions during D-Day. The project won an EPPY Award in 2016.

Eva moved back home and dabbled in social media management before returning to the world of print journalism as a community reporter for the (other) Metro newspaper, covering news, sports and arts in Winnipeg’s western neighbourhoods.

In 2019, Eva joined the Winnipeg Free Press newsroom as an arts and life reporter and has since written stories for nearly every other section of the paper.

Her interests include food culture and systems, visual arts, music and creativity in its many forms. She also has a soft spot for a good animal story.

Recent articles of Eva Wasney

What’s up

Eva Wasney and Alan Small and Jen Zoratti and Ben Sigurdson and Jill Wilson 6 minute read Preview

What’s up

Eva Wasney and Alan Small and Jen Zoratti and Ben Sigurdson and Jill Wilson 6 minute read Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2022

Winnipeg Beer FestivalSaturday, Aug. 13, 5 p.m.-midnightFort Gibraltar, 866 Rue St. JosephTickets from $17.35, wpgbeerfestival.com

With weekend temperatures set to soar, there’s no better spot to grab a cold one in Winnipeg this Saturday than within the wooden walls of Fort Gibraltar.

The fifth annual Winnipeg Beer Festival returns to St. Boniface on Aug. 13, with 23 producers of beer (of course), wine, cider, mead, spirits and more set to pour their wares to help thirsty locals beat the heat.

Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2022

FREE PRESS FILES
The fifth annual Winnipeg Beer Festival returns to St. Boniface on Aug. 13.

Hoagie Boyz brings Italian-style sandwiches to South Osborne

Eva Wasney 5 minute read Preview

Hoagie Boyz brings Italian-style sandwiches to South Osborne

Eva Wasney 5 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2022

It all started with a curious vignette. Two chefs with a giant submarine sandwich hoisted atop their shoulders en route to, presumably, devour their cargo in some undisclosed location. They look hungry. One is sporting a wide grin and the other is licking his lips.

“It became a running joke and we started calling these guys the hoagie boys,” Stefan Lytwyn says of the goofy red and white line drawing emblazoned on his paper sandwich bags. “That’s literally where the name of the restaurant came from, everything is inspired by this stupid bag.”

Hoagie Boyz, a new sandwich shop in South Osborne, is the creation of Lytwyn and Nyk Bielak along with co-conspirators Nick Luchak and Jesse Angers — the foursome is also the brains behind Kosmo’s Space Cowboy Food Cantina, a bombastic comfort-food ghost kitchen that rose to prominence amid the pandemic.

While Kosmo’s doled out burgers, fried chicken and loaded tater tots, Hoagie Boyz is focused on classic sub sandwiches with a twist. The change of concept was necessary when they finally found their brick-and-mortar location. Deep-frying wasn’t an option in the former barbeque joint at 513 Osborne St., so the business partners decided to simplify.

Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2022

ETHAN CAIRNS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

South Osborne has become something of a local food mecca as of late, and the brains behind Hoagie Boyz felt a ‘friendly sandwich shop’ was a good fit for the area.

Bright lights, big sound and chrome beach balls

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Preview

Bright lights, big sound and chrome beach balls

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022

It’s a luxuriously local event three years in the making.

After multiple pandemic delays, the inaugural Current Festival is finally moving into The Forks next Friday for a three-day event that’s being billed as “unapologetically extra.”

“When I talk to people about it, they’re excited about three L’s,” festival director Monica Derksen says. “The location being convenient, the luxury of it, and the local aspects.”

Derksen’s title doesn’t quite capture the scope of her role. For financial reasons, she had to lay off staff at the beginning of the public health crisis and has been operating largely as a one-woman show — co-ordinating everything from the music to the design to the marketing.

Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022

Supplied

The music lineup includes local stars, including Begonia, Royal Canoe and the Bros. Landreth. ‘If we have a budget for a stage show, let’s give it to local artists,’ says director Monica Derksen.

What’s up

Eva Wasney and Alan Small and Jen Zoratti and Ben Sigurdson and Jill Wilson 3 minute read Preview

What’s up

Eva Wasney and Alan Small and Jen Zoratti and Ben Sigurdson and Jill Wilson 3 minute read Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022

Movie night at the Lyric TheatreFriday, Aug. 5, 6:30 p.m. and 8:45 p.m.Lyric Theatre, Assiniboine ParkFree admission

Assiniboine Park’s weekly summer movie night returns to the Lyric Theatre this Friday with a lineup heavy on big-budget, mainly family-friendly flicks.

The free double bill kicks off at 6:30 p.m. with a screening of Sing 2, the 2021 animated musical comedy featuring the voices of Matthew McConaughey, Reese Witherspoon, Scarlett Johansson and many more. This time around, the gang must convince Clay Calloway, an aging rock star lion (voiced by Bono), to leave his reclusive life and come out of retirement. Clay and the gang must face their fears in a production that could make or break their careers.

Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022

Marvel Studios Kumail Nanjiani (from left), Lia McHugh, Gemma Chan, Richard Madden, Angelina Jolie and Don Lee in a scene from Eternals.

Free Press Folklorama Bingo card invites Winnipeggers to take in two-week cultural festival one square at a time

Eva Wasney and Jen Zoratti 13 minute read Preview

Free Press Folklorama Bingo card invites Winnipeggers to take in two-week cultural festival one square at a time

Eva Wasney and Jen Zoratti 13 minute read Friday, Jul. 29, 2022

There are exactly 24 pavilions taking part in this year’s Folklorama, which kicks off Sunday and runs until Aug. 13.

There are also exactly 24 squares on a bingo card, minus the free space.

So, we thought we’d take advantage of this serendipity to present our first-ever Folklorama Bingo, a fun challenge that encourages you to get out there and experience some culture.

Can you hit enough pavilions to get a line? How about the full card? (A tip to maximize your experience: the 9:45 p.m. shows on Monday and Tuesday nights are $1 admission, thanks to funding from the Manitoba Government.)

Friday, Jul. 29, 2022

Daniel Crump / Winnipeg Free Press

Portuguese dancers perform during the kick-off for Folklorama at Assiniboine Park Saturday evening. Folklorama is back after a two year pandemic hiatus.

What’s up

Eva Wasney and Alan Small and Jen Zoratti and Ben Sigurdson and Jill Wilson 3 minute read Preview

What’s up

Eva Wasney and Alan Small and Jen Zoratti and Ben Sigurdson and Jill Wilson 3 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 27, 2022

Winnipeg Comedy ShowcaseJuly 31, 8 p.m. (doors at 7 p.m.)Park TheatreTickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door

When the Winnipeg Comedy Showcase made its debut in January 2014, comedian and showcase host/producer Jared Story figured it might be a one-off.

He was (happily) proven (very) wrong: Sunday night’s show at the Park Theatre will be the 30th edition of the Winnipeg Comedy Showcase — a nice, round number that illustrates just how important the showcase has been for emerging and established local comics alike. When comedians are cutting their teeth, it’s often while being ignored at an open-mic night at a bar; the Winnipeg Comedy Showcase, meanwhile, offers comics the chance to audience-test bits and hone their tight fives in a theatre.

Featured funny people on Sunday night’s bill include Andy Noble, Emmanuel Lomuro, Karlee Liljegren, Abby Falvo, Matt Kay and Carson Košik. Advance tickets are available via Ticketweb, Eventbrite or from the comics on the bill.

Wednesday, Jul. 27, 2022

Islendingadagurinn returns to Gimli this weekend

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Preview

Islendingadagurinn returns to Gimli this weekend

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 27, 2022

The spirit of Iceland returns to Gimli in full force this weekend.

Islendingadagurinn, the Icelandic Festival of Manitoba, kicks off Friday and runs to Monday with a full slate of programming and some burly new events for the first time since the pandemic began. (Last year’s scaled-down event was a mix of virtual and in-person activities owing to public health restrictions.)

“I think it’s gonna be a really huge, good festival,” says president Jenna Boholij. “We have more special guests than ever attending, a full event schedule and… lots of things that haven’t been around for the last couple of years are back now.”

Returning to the fold during the four-day festival are the annual parade, Sunday fun run, cultural pavilion and viking battles, among other events.

Wednesday, Jul. 27, 2022

Islendingadagurinn is partnering with Icelander Magnús Ver Magnússon to host the MVM Classic Gimli, a world-class strongman event showcasing traditional Icelandic feats of strength. (Supplied)

From Brittany to West Broadway

Eva Wasney 5 minute read Preview

From Brittany to West Broadway

Eva Wasney 5 minute read Monday, Jul. 25, 2022

Swap the steady flow of traffic on Sherbrook Street for the cool blue waters of the Bay of Biscay and La Crêperie Ker Breizh is a convincing replica of a seaside café in Brittany, France.

Recreating a sense of home was the main goal for husband-and-wife owners Yvonnick Le Lorec and Ketty Pichaud.

“(Ker) is a space where you have conviviality, like a sharing space,” Le Lorec says, translating the restaurant’s name. “And Breizh is Brittany, so it’s the Home Sweet Home of Brittany.”

Ker Breizh is the new kid on this particular block of Sherbrook between Portage Avenue and Broadway, but the couple’s brand of sweet and savoury French crêpes has been rolling around Winnipeg since 2018.

Monday, Jul. 25, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Owners Yvonnick Le Lorec (left) and Ketty Pichaud have expanded Ker Breizh’s offerings at the café’s new brick-and-mortar location.

At Rainbow Community Garden, newcomers to Canada grow food and forge relationships

Eva Wasney 6 minute read Preview

At Rainbow Community Garden, newcomers to Canada grow food and forge relationships

Eva Wasney 6 minute read Friday, Jul. 22, 2022

Black beans, hot peppers, tomatoes and cabbage. Like many other Winnipeg gardeners, Henriette Mukesa’s seedlings are off to a slow start thanks to a waterlogged spring. Still, there’s plenty to eat in the shoulder season.

“Before the beans, we eat this,” she says, pointing to the legume’s bright green leaves, which she’ll fry up at home and add to her dinner of fufu, a starchy dough, and vegetables or meat.

It’s the same story with the okra and zucchini sprouting in the shared bed of the Rainbow Community Garden at the University of Manitoba. In fact, Mukesa prefers the leaves of the zucchini plant to the squash itself.

She bends over to pinch off a shoot, demonstrating how to peel the spiky outer skin before softening the greens in water and salt — a method of preparation used in her birthplace, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and adapted to vegetables that flourish in the Canadian Prairies.

Friday, Jul. 22, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Henriette Mukesa is from the Democratic Republic of Congo and a gardener with the Rainbow Community Garden program, which sees 300 families growing produce at plots across the city.

Henriette is sharing a salad recipe that she makes with ingredients grown from the garden.

Henriette collects a cabbage from the Rainbow Garden U of M site.

See Eva Wasney story

220707 - Thursday, July 07, 2022.

Your guide to getting the best out of the Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival

Eva Wasney 6 minute read Preview

Your guide to getting the best out of the Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival

Eva Wasney 6 minute read Tuesday, Jul. 12, 2022

Artists and audience members alike are getting back into the swing of live performances during the triumphant return of the Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival this week.

With 113 shows and myriad Exchange District activities to navigate, the Free Press reached out to fringe volunteer co-ordinator Joseph Abetria for some tips on making the most of this year’s busy event.

Abetria is a costume designer by trade who has been organizing the fringe’s hundreds of volunteers for the last six years. His favourite part of the summer festival is the way it brings Winnipeg’s theatre scene together during the off-season.

“Working in the theatre industry, it’s just really lovely to see everyone together,” he says. “Especially in the summer, when all the big theatres are closed, except for Rainbow Stage and (Shakespeare in the Ruins).”

Tuesday, Jul. 12, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Ray Strachan checks out the fringe posters plastered along Market Avenue.

Folk fest fun for all ages

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Preview

Folk fest fun for all ages

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Saturday, Jul. 9, 2022

BIRDS HILL PARK — Under the shade of the Chickadee Big Top, Shelagh Graham had her hands full — a clothespin dragonfly, a coffee filter butterfly and a series of googly-eyed “inventions” made of found objects. At a nearby picnic table, four-year-old Corniglia was busy making a new piece of art to add to the pile.

“It’s a kitty,” she announced, while drawing whiskers on a piece of orange foam. After a few minutes she passed “catman” off to her mom and wandered over to another table covered in pipe cleaners and markers.

“We found our way here and now we can’t leave,” Graham said with a laugh. “I knew that people spent a lot of time here, you’d walk past and see the same people, but I totally understand why, she’s really excited about each and every (craft).”

Saturday, Jul. 9, 2022

DANIEL CRUMP / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Alice Mierau, 6, plays under a parachute during the Winnipeg Folk Festival Saturday.

Folk Fashion

Eva Wasney 7 minute read Preview

Folk Fashion

Eva Wasney 7 minute read Saturday, Jul. 9, 2022

Flower crowns, neon tie dye, sparkly facepaint, flowy harem pants and Birkenstock sandals of every variety. Personal style knows no bounds at the Winnipeg Folk Festival.

While fashion, in general, has taken a hit over the last three years — hello work-from-home sweatpants, goodbye stuffy office attire — festival fashion has been basically nonexistent. Aside from the beach, there are few places in regular life where bathing suits and barefeet pass for an acceptable outfit.

On Friday, festivalgoers appeared to be making up for lost time with a wide range of outfits carefully picked for their form and function. An outdoor summer festival with sun and rain in the forecast requires both, after all.

Here are just a few of the inspired looks from the first full day of the folk fest:

Saturday, Jul. 9, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Crystal Kotelmach poses for a photo at the Winnipeg Folk Fest in Bird’s Hill Park on Friday, July 8, 2022. For Eva Wasney fashion story. Winnipeg Free Press 2022.

Folk festival delivers blue skies and great vibes

Eva Wasney 3 minute read Preview

Folk festival delivers blue skies and great vibes

Eva Wasney 3 minute read Friday, Jul. 8, 2022

A sprawling crowd gathered under blue skies to take in some twangy guitar and equally twangy vocals courtesy of Kurt Vile and The Sadies on Friday afternoon. Vile, a multi-instrumentalist singer-songwriter and former frontman of The War on Drugs, joined members of the Toronto country rock band for an hour-long concert full of originals and covers.

“Kurt requested a Sadies song that I honestly forgot we wrote,” band co-founder Travis Good said of the tune Violet and Jeffrey Lee off the group’s 2010 album Darker Circles. Vile’s pining love song In My Baby’s Arm and John Prine’s How Lucky were also on the setlist.

The amalgam was a mish-mash of talent. Vile provided accompanying vocals and guitar for Good — a role previously reserved for Travis’ brother and Sadies singer Dallas Good, who died in February at the age of 48. And Kyle Spence of The Violators picked up the sticks for Sadies drummer Mike Belitsky, who was missing in action after getting surgery earlier in the week for a ligament in his hand.

If there’s a voice that fits with the cosy, wooded setting of Little Stage in the Forest, it’s Fontine’s clear and ethereal tones. The Winnipeg-based Nehiyaw Iskwew singer-songwriter performed to a shade-seeking crowd with friend and bandmate, Boy Golden on banjo. The pair of local artists have been playing and touring together for the last number of years and their comfortable relationship made for a jovial concert interspersed with good natured ribbing and banter.

Friday, Jul. 8, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Folk Fest attendees listen to Ladama on the main stage at the Winnipeg Folk Fest in Bird’s Hill Park on Friday.

What’s up at Folk Fest

Ben Sigurdson, Eva Wasney, Rob Williams, Jen Zoratti 6 minute read Preview

What’s up at Folk Fest

Ben Sigurdson, Eva Wasney, Rob Williams, Jen Zoratti 6 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 6, 2022

The daytime stages at the Winnipeg Folk Festival are ripe for musical discovery. This week’s What’s Up is dedicated to the must-sees before the headliners.

Kurt Vile and the SadiesGreen Ash, Friday at 1 p.m.

Music fans and artists were shocked and saddened earlier this year when the Sadies’ guitarist-vocalist Dallas Good died on Feb. 17 from a recently discovered coronary illness at the age of 48.

Wednesday, Jul. 6, 2022

SUPPLIED
Kurt Vile will share the stage Friday with frequent collaborators, the Sadies.

Music will sound as sweet, but folk fest fans should be ready for changes

Eva Wasney 10 minute read Preview

Music will sound as sweet, but folk fest fans should be ready for changes

Eva Wasney 10 minute read Tuesday, Jul. 5, 2022

It’s been a minute — more than 1.5 million minutes, actually — since throngs of people gathered in Birds Hill Park to celebrate music and community under a wide summer sky filled with dragonflies. The Winnipeg Folk Festival is back for the first time since 2019 and you’d be forgiven for feeling a little rusty.

While the core experience remains unchanged, there are a number of new initiatives and necessary adjustments that have happened amid the pandemic. Managing resources — of both the human and supply variety — has been top of mind for organizers.

“We’ve had to make some changes due to having a bit of a volunteer shortage,” folk fest executive producer Lynne Skromeda says. “We’re making it work and we’re doing the best we can.”

The festival has secured more than 2,000 volunteers, but is still shy of its usual targets. To keep essential services running smoothly, non-essential operations in the box office, parking lot, campground, audience-services tent and elsewhere have been pared down.

Tuesday, Jul. 5, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Kids play in bubbles on the final day of The Folk Fest Sunday, July 8, 2018.

What’s up

Eva Wasney and Alan Small and Jen Zoratti and Ben Sigurdson and Jill Wilson 4 minute read Preview

What’s up

Eva Wasney and Alan Small and Jen Zoratti and Ben Sigurdson and Jill Wilson 4 minute read Thursday, Jun. 30, 2022

Workman, fireworks to light up the DownsJuly 1, 1-11 p.m.Assiniboia Downs Gaming & Event Centre, 1975 Portage Ave.$10 admission (ages five and under free), $5 parking

If you’re jonesing for your fireworks fix this Canada Day, go west. Assiniboia Downs Gaming and Event Centre is hosting a Canada Day festival that starts at 1 p.m. and will include those thrilling aerial pops, bangs and flashes via CanFire Pyrotechnics at 11 p.m.

Prior to the fireworks, there will be plenty to see and do for all ages. The day’s events include a range of activities for kids, over 100 local artisans and makers offering up their wares, a beer garden and all manner of food trucks.

Live music kicks off right at 1 p.m. with a lineup headlined by Hawksley Workman and including Space Case, Cassidy Mann, Madeleine Roger, Justin Lacroix Band, the Incredibly Hip and Sassy Mellows.

Thursday, Jun. 30, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / FREE PRESS FILES
Hawksley Workman

Fringe festival is back after two-year absence

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Preview

Fringe festival is back after two-year absence

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Tuesday, Jun. 21, 2022

Eclectic, experimental and oddball performance art returns to centre stage this summer during the first live Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival in two years.

On Tuesday, the organization announced its lineup for the 12-day festival, which begins July 13 and includes 113 different shows of every imaginable genre.

“It allows the creativity of the indie artists to shine,” executive producer Chuck McEwen says of the festival’s non-prescriptive format. “Fringers have to sort of take a chance with a lot of new work and artists they’ve never heard of and that’s what makes it unique in the performance world.”

This year’s pared-down roster — Fringe usually hosts upwards of 170 shows — is due to space constraints and artist availability. Several of the festival’s usual venues were undergoing construction and others, like the University of Winnipeg and Red River College, weren’t open to outside bookings owing to pandemic restrictions while the groundwork was being laid in January. While artists who were accepted into the 2020 festival have had their spot deferred until this year, travelling still presents a risk for out-of-town performers.

Tuesday, Jun. 21, 2022

WAYNE GLOWACKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
As usual, Old Market Square in the Exchange District will be reserved for live music and buskers.

The taste of Manitoba walleye by way of the Philippines

Eva Wasney 7 minute read Preview

The taste of Manitoba walleye by way of the Philippines

Eva Wasney 7 minute read Friday, Jun. 17, 2022

WINNIPEG BEACH — The rod twitches lightly and Eric Labaupa jumps out of his seat. The telltale sign of a nibble. He pulls up to set the hook and starts reeling.

“Ah, it’s just a small one,” he says, the excitement dropping from his voice before the fish breaks the surface. When you’ve been fishing as long as Labaupa, it’s easy to tell when you’ve got a keeper on the line.

After a photo and a quick inspection, he tosses the young sauger back into the murky brown water. Today, he’s on the hunt for walleye — or pickerel, as the mild freshwater fish is often marketed.

Friday, Jun. 17, 2022

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Eric Labaupa learned his love of fishing from his father.

What’s Up

Eva Wasney and Alan Small and Jen Zoratti and Ben Sigurdson and Jill Wilson 6 minute read Preview

What’s Up

Eva Wasney and Alan Small and Jen Zoratti and Ben Sigurdson and Jill Wilson 6 minute read Thursday, Jun. 16, 2022

Comedian Nate Bargatze brings Raincheck Tour to WinnipegJune 16, 7 p.m.

Burton Cummings Theatre

Tickets $63-$108 at Ticketmaster

You could say that comedian Nate Bargatze was born into the funny business.

Thursday, Jun. 16, 2022

SASHA SEFTER / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS files

Women’s traditional drum group a welcoming force of healing

Eva Wasney 5 minute read Preview

Women’s traditional drum group a welcoming force of healing

Eva Wasney 5 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 15, 2022

A group of women in colourful ribbon skirts sit in the middle of a grassy field at Kildonan Park. Families are strolling through the warm evening air. A volleyball game is underway on the nearby court.

After some joking and chatting, the women pick up their drumsticks and launch into song. Their piercing harmony and tandem drumming carries across the park, causing passersby to change course and approach the circle to listen.

“This is my favourite thing to do,” Meagan Salwan says. “It’s the energy I get from it, the energy it gives off. If I’m having a crap day and I go drum, I’m fine after, it’s my self care. The drum always brings healing — we’re healing others and we’re healing ourselves.”

But the Southern Thunderbird Medicine Drum group hasn’t always been received as a healing force.

Wednesday, Jun. 15, 2022

PRABHJOT SINGH LOTEY / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS The drum, which is draped in purple fabric to signify healing, has been played at many funerals and vigils across Manitoba.

Fête accompli: Francophone fest throwing summer bash

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Preview

Fête accompli: Francophone fest throwing summer bash

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 1, 2022

Sam Roberts and his bandmates have forgotten how to pace themselves.

“It literally feels like we’ve been shot out of a cannon right now,” the alt-rocker says with a laugh during a break from his first tour in two years. “Part of being on the road all these years is (knowing) how to curb that over-enthusiasm and now we don’t have that self-control anymore — we’re just so excited to be back onstage.”

First he has to “mow the lawn and change up the clothes,” but Roberts will be hitting the road again this week to perform in Winnipeg at an outdoor event hosted by Festival du Voyageur. The annual cultural festival is wading into summer programming with a live music party at Fort Gibraltar this Friday featuring the Sam Roberts Band and a bevy of local talent.

Roberts, an anglophone who grew up in the French-speaking city of Montreal, says he feels a kinship with Manitoba’s francophone community.

Wednesday, Jun. 1, 2022

The Sam Roberts Band will be headlining Festival du Voyageur’s outdoor summer concert this Friday at Fort Gibraltar. (Dave Gillespie photo)

Neighbouring restaurants make Canada’s Top 100 list

Eva Wasney 2 minute read Preview

Neighbouring restaurants make Canada’s Top 100 list

Eva Wasney 2 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 1, 2022

Two neighbouring Winnipeg eateries have been ranked among the top restaurants in the country.

Máquè and Close Company, which are situated next door from one another on Stafford Street, have been included in this year’s Canada’s 100 Best Restaurants List.

This is the second time chef-restaurateur Scott Bagshaw has had a business represented in the annual food and drink ranking scale. Enoteca was included in 2020.

“Hopefully we can get Passero on that list next year to get the trifecta finished,” Bagshaw says with a laugh. “I’m super proud of my staff and very grateful for our clientele.”

Wednesday, Jun. 1, 2022

Chef Scott Bagshaw's restaurant Maque has been ranked 74th on this year's Canada's 100 Best Restaurants List. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press Files)

Parcel Pizza delivers familiar favourite wrapped up with a saucy twist

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Preview

Parcel Pizza delivers familiar favourite wrapped up with a saucy twist

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Tuesday, May. 31, 2022

Good ideas come to those who wait (for the right location).

Parcel Pizza, a new restaurant from the owners of the Roost and Oxbow, is a case of food inspired by its surroundings. The pizzeria, located on the main floor of a new residential building on Stradbrook Avenue — although it’s equidistant from Osborne Village, downtown and The Forks — is one of the only eateries in the neighbourhood. Choosing a cuisine that would draw people in was the first order of business.

“We thought that something that is universally beloved, like pizza, would be really beneficial for the area,” says co-owner Elsa Taylor. “Another reason, what with the plague and all, is that we wanted something that would be conducive to takeout and delivery.”

Tuesday, May. 31, 2022

JESSICA LEE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Parcel Pizza chef Jessica Champion-Taylor adds pepperoni on a pizza.

Architect of gay rights movement prefers humbler title

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Preview

Architect of gay rights movement prefers humbler title

Eva Wasney 4 minute read Tuesday, May. 24, 2022

Phil Graham is a founder of Manitoba’s gay rights movement. Growing up in a small rural community, however, he didn’t know what the term gay meant until he learned about it in church.

“I didn’t even know that men could have sex with men until I read it in… Leviticus,” Graham says, referring to the Old Testament book that includes passages prohibiting homosexuality. “It used to be quoted to us all the time saying gay was wrong, there was nothing positive.”

That upbringing made it harder to come out as an adult. He feared being ostracized from his community and rejected by his friends. Thankfully, reality didn’t live up to Graham’s expectations.

“Everybody accepted me,” says the 78-year-old Métis retiree, who came out in 1969 while attending grad school at the University of Minnesota. “All my friends accepted me fine and other friends said, ‘Well, what took you so long.’”

Tuesday, May. 24, 2022

JESSICA LEE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Ashley Smith says the Legends of Pride speaker series is about coming together to share, but also ‘about chronicling these stories so they can be kept. If not, we’re going to lose them.’