Maggie Macintosh

Maggie Macintosh

Reporter

Maggie Macintosh got her start in journalism delivering newspapers door-to-door with a wagon she wheeled around her Hamilton, Ont. neighbourhood.

A decade later, in December 2017, she joined the Winnipeg Free Press team as an intern. That’s when she got her first front-page story in a daily, frostbite and, fairly quickly, fell for Winnipeg — a city just as gritty and underestimated as the one she’s from.

Maggie returned to the newsroom the following summer, before her final year at Ryerson’s School of Journalism in Toronto and again, after she graduated. She started as a full-time reporter the same day she turned 22.

Prior to packing her bags for Winnipeg, Maggie worked stints at CBC Toronto, CBC Radio and CBC Calgary. She was a 2019 recipient of the CBC News Joan Donaldson Scholarship. Her work has also been published in The Hamilton Spectator.

When she’s not making cold calls, Maggie calls line on the ice as a skip. During the off-season, she can be spotted on her bike or with a picnic and a paperback in Assiniboine Park.

Maggie is a bilingual English/French journalist who appreciates alliteration and tips on anything education-related. Contrary to popular assumption, if she were a teacher, she’d prefer a Granny Smith on her desk on the first day of school.

Funding for the Free Press education reporter comes from the Government of Canada through the Local Journalism Initiative.

Recent articles of Maggie Macintosh

School board could allow remote delegations

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

School board could allow remote delegations

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Thursday, Nov. 24, 2022

A trek to the Winnipeg School Division’s Wall Street boardroom may soon become optional for members of the public who want to speak at regular trustee meetings.

Manitoba’s largest school board, which oversees the education of approximately 30,000 K-12 students, is considering options to limit barriers to participation in its biweekly forums.

Earlier this week, rookie trustee Rebecca Chambers put forward a notice of motion to allow delegations to appear before the board remotely, be it via audio link, video link or telephone “where transit, mobility or childcare presents accessibility challenges.”

Chambers, who — alongside six other first-time trustees elected to the board’s nine-member board for the 2022-26 term — has been learning the ropes of her new role in recent weeks.

Thursday, Nov. 24, 2022

Delegations may soon not have to appear in person at the Winnipeg School Board administration building. (John Woods / Winnipeg Free Press files)

Respiratory illnesses continue barrage of classroom disruptions

Maggie Macintosh 6 minute read Preview

Respiratory illnesses continue barrage of classroom disruptions

Maggie Macintosh 6 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2022

Respiratory diseases are creating a revolving door of disruptions to regular attendance and lesson planning in Manitoba schools — making it all but impossible to return to pre-pandemic operations and deliver consistent, high-quality instruction.

School administrators have been fielding a growing number of sick calls related to runny noses and fevers from both caregivers and education workers in recent weeks.

Grade 6 student Scarlett Schadek has missed two full weeks over the last month, owing to a positive rapid antigen COVID-19 test and more recently, a cold.

“I have to catch-up on a lot of work… and I’m a bit behind everybody, but I’m working really hard to catch up,” Scarlett said, during an interview after the final bell Tuesday.

Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Scarlett Schadek (11) and her brother, Eli (nine) pose for a photo in their home in Winnipeg on Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2022. The Schadek family is among those who have had to keep their kids home in recent weeks due to a revolving door of illnesses. For Maggie story. Winnipeg Free Press 2022.

Faculty reports BU for gaps in health and safety rules

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Faculty reports BU for gaps in health and safety rules

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2022

A series of safety incidents involving staff members at Brandon University and the absence of workplace protocols on how exactly to address them have sparked concern among academics.

Last week, faculty association executives informed members they had reported their employer to provincial authorities because of “a significant gap” in the university’s health and safety framework.

“This situation is no longer tenable, nor is it tolerable,” union leaders wrote in a mass email Nov. 17.

Manitoba labour laws require certain workplaces, including public schools and post-secondary institutions, to assess job-related safety risks and enforce a violence prevention policy.

Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2022

WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

A freedom of information request filed by the Free Press indicates Brandon University has been growing its network of panic switches in recent terms.

Human-rights project hopes to get better bead on reading

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

Human-rights project hopes to get better bead on reading

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Monday, Nov. 21, 2022

The Manitoba Human Rights Commission is on a mission to hear from as many people as possible who have faced challenges learning how to read or providing literacy instruction — be it at a local school, tutoring centre or kitchen table.

The commission launched a special project this fall that aims to document concerns about reading instruction with the goal of boosting overall literacy levels.

“What I’ve noticed is that my daughter is guessing words that are nowhere near the word (on the page), which is pretty surprising at this point. It’s kind of shocking there’s no sounding it out… We’ve been struggling,” said Tegann McNiven, a public school parent in Winnipeg.

The mother of two started doing research and raising the issue with educators and other families at her children’s elementary school. It turns out her Grade 2 student is, like many others in Manitoba, being taught to read via a controversial philosophy that has faced no shortage of criticism over the last year.

Monday, Nov. 21, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
Karen Sharma, acting executive director of the Manitoba Human Rights Commission, said the independent organization hopes the changes will result in improved access to justice for everyone involved.

Repairs force Westminster United to relocate services

Maggie Macintosh 3 minute read Preview

Repairs force Westminster United to relocate services

Maggie Macintosh 3 minute read Monday, Nov. 21, 2022

Just over a month before traditional Christmas services at a Wolseley church were anticipated to resume — following two years of COVID-19 disruptions — a new issue threatens to cancel the landmark’s in-person holiday programming.

Notices posted on all of the doors at Westminster United Church informed parishioners their usual Sunday service would be held at another congregation in the neighbourhood on Sunday.

Earlier this month, the sight of a drooping ceiling in one area of the building located at the corner of Maryland Street and Westminster Avenue prompted engineers to temporarily shut the entire building down.

Brandon Johnston, chairman of the church’s property committee, said engineers arrived at the 110-year-old structure on Nov. 4 to assess another issue when they came across a more immediate concern: a structural problem related to the roof.

Monday, Nov. 21, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

The Westminster United Church board anticipates it will receive repair proposals next month but the cost and timeline are not yet known.

Springs Church pastor Leon Fontaine dies at 59

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

Springs Church pastor Leon Fontaine dies at 59

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022

Members of a Winnipeg church are mourning the death of the man who grew their congregation to be one of the largest in the country.

Springs Church pastor Leon Fontaine made a name for himself as a charismatic speaker and earned notoriety for hosting services that broke public health rules throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

Fontaine died on Saturday, according to his family. He was a 59-year-old grandfather, days away from celebrating a milestone birthday.

“It’s with devastated hearts that we’re sharing with you today that on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 5 p.m. our dad, pastor Leon went to be with Jesus,” said Eden Shimoda, in a prerecorded video of her and her four siblings that was aired at the end of respective services held throughout the day Sunday.

Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

Springs pastor Leon Fontaine preaches from the big screen as the church on Lagimodière Boulevard holds a parking-lot service owing to COVID-19 restriction on public gatherings.

Satellite campus for rural students adds to nursing ranks

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Satellite campus for rural students adds to nursing ranks

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Friday, Nov. 18, 2022

The rollout of a unique rural satellite campus on which 25 nurses-in-training are studying in southeastern Manitoba is being celebrated as a template to address the chronic shortage of practitioners across the province.

Assiniboine Community College, Providence University College and Southern Health marked the official launch of a new so-called “rural rotating site” earlier this month.

Providence is hosting a cohort enrolled in its post-secondary partner’s practical nursing diploma.

While the future nurses are registered at Assiniboine, they attend courses and participate in student life — including secular and Christian programs and services — in Otterburne, located about 60 kilometres south of Winnipeg.

Friday, Nov. 18, 2022

Artificial morphine at Assiniboine Community College’s nursing lab (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press)

Province takes step back from proposed post-secondary funding formula

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Province takes step back from proposed post-secondary funding formula

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022

The provincial government is pausing plans to roll out a controversial new funding formula for universities and colleges that would require metrics — for instance, specific graduation rates and other achievement benchmarks — be met in exchange for dollars.

Manitoba has long-funded post-secondary institutes with annual block grants. In recent years, however, the Progressive Conservatives have set their sights on Tennessee’s performance-based funding model.

The proposed formula, which is popular across the United States, has been met with widespread criticism from local school leaders, faculty associations and student groups.

“We need to take a bit of a step back, look at those institutions and say: ‘What is going to keep them going right now?’” Premier Heather Stefanson told reporters Tuesday, following the release of a throne speech that made no mention of metric-based funding.

Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022

Manitoba has long-funded post-secondary institutes with annual block grants, but recently, the Progressive Conservatives have set their sights on a performance-based funding model. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press files)

Liberals seek to push trustee campaign oversight into spotlight

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Liberals seek to push trustee campaign oversight into spotlight

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022

The Manitoba Liberals are preparing a private member’s bill to introduce fundraising rules for school trustee candidates — the only people who can run for public office in the province with no oversight of campaign donors and expenses.

“We absolutely need campaign finance reform, because (the absence of rules) has opened the door for people who aren’t even Manitobans to influence our democratic process,” Liberal leader Dougald Lamont told the Free Press.

Unlike contestants running in municipal, provincial and federal elections, there are no laws that regulate who can contribute to a school board nominee’s campaign or how much money individuals can accept.

Residents running for trustee need to submit a list of at least 25 signatures from eligible voters in the ward in which they are seeking election to be included on a ballot.

Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

Liberal leader Dougald Lamont scrums with the media at the Manitoba Legislative Building in Winnipeg on Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2022. For Carol/Danielle stories. Winnipeg Free Press 2022.

Defeated trustee sets record straight over discipline

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Defeated trustee sets record straight over discipline

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Saturday, Nov. 12, 2022

A school trustee of more than 25 years, who lost in the recent election after it was reported he was temporarily banned from attending events on behalf of the school board, says his punishment did not fit his offence.

Peter Kotyk did not initially respond to requests for comment when the Free Press learned his River East Transcona School Division trustee colleagues had unanimously disciplined him “for breaching the board code of ethics.”

In an interview this week, Kotyk said he agreed with friends that he needed to focus on his campaign at the time, one week before voters went to the polls.

Since then, he said he has heard from countless concerned constituents and wants to set the record straight.

Saturday, Nov. 12, 2022

JESSICA LEE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

“I did what I did and I was punished for it — much more severely than I would have ever imagined,” said Peter Kotyk.

Viruses raise absenteeism rates in schools across city

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Viruses raise absenteeism rates in schools across city

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Thursday, Nov. 10, 2022

Virtual assemblies for Remembrance Day and other holidays have yet to disappear from Winnipeg schools, as COVID-19 remains a concern, along with other illnesses that have made their way into classrooms.

Yet K-12 leaders are committed to rebuilding a sense of community in their schools.

“Our absenteeism rate has just passed 10 per cent… In the community, there is an increase in influenza, RSV (respiratory syncytial virus), and COVID-19, among other illnesses,” states a bulletin from École Van Walleghem School.

On Wednesday, principal Sharon Labossiere and vice-principal Carrie Lourenzo informed families the K-8 building would host its Remembrance Day service via videoconferencing platform Microsoft Teams again this year.

Thursday, Nov. 10, 2022

Absenteeism at École Van Walleghem School has just passed 10 per cent, according to a bulletin sent to parents. (Jessica Lee / Winnipeg Free Press files)

Manitoba teachers call well-being to front of classroom

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

Manitoba teachers call well-being to front of classroom

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022

Manitoba teachers say their workforce is grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic’s “shadow effect” — both a surge of mental health concerns and limited services to address them — following the height of virus-related lockdowns and remote learning.

“My anxiety levels about everything are out of this world… I definitely am experiencing anxiety about what I think might be trivial things; it kind of pops up out of the blue,” said Richelle North Star Scott, a teacher based in Winnipeg.

In the early days of the pandemic, North Star Scott delivered remote lessons and later co-taught classrooms filled with masked students. In her personal life, she took care of her anxious children and worried about her personal and family well-being.

The teacher, employed as an Indigenous co-ordinator in city schools, said she could not help but stress about the worst-case scenario when her daughter, who has asthma, contracted the novel coronavirus before immunizations were available.

Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

49.8 COVID Learning Loss Photos of Mercége Martins (instructor and owner of the River Heights Kumon franchise); and various shots of workbooks and desks where young students work after school hours. This feature will explore the various datasets we have on learning loss in Manitoba to date and how students were affected socially/emotionally and in terms of their academic achievement. Martins, one of the key sources for the project, talked in depth about her worries about gaps and in particular, concern around reading comprehension and K-6 students not receiving the foundational blocks they would typically get due to inconsistent in-class learning and one-on-one time. COVID LEARNING LOSS 49.8: The students enrolled in an after-school math and reading program in River Heights vary in skill level. The COVID-19 pandemic has produced potholes in their education — each of a different depth, width and overall size — that they are now filling at Kumon. Reporter info: Maggie Macintosh June 24th, 2022

Losing candidate urges WSD trustees to consider ‘open mic’ participation

Maggie Macintosh 2 minute read Preview

Losing candidate urges WSD trustees to consider ‘open mic’ participation

Maggie Macintosh 2 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022

Manitoba’s largest school board is being urged to launch an “open mic” forum and promote it widely to encourage parents and other community members to voice their views about programming in inner-city classrooms.

On Monday, the Winnipeg School Division held its first public meeting since its nine new trustees were elected to the central board for the 2022-2026 term.

Following the election of a board leader — incumbent trustee Betty Edel was named chairwoman for the third consecutive year — and various committee heads, members heard from a single delegation.

Patrick Allard, a candidate who lost to Edel in the race for Ward 8, encouraged the board to consider expanding the opportunities available to members of the public when it comes to sharing experiences in the division.

Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / FREE PRESS FILES

Patrick Allard said the board should consider implementing open mic nights during board meetings or other times and promote them widely to hear from more individuals before making school-related decisions.

Province adds money to help with influx of newcomer students

Maggie Macintosh 3 minute read Preview

Province adds money to help with influx of newcomer students

Maggie Macintosh 3 minute read Monday, Nov. 7, 2022

A sudden influx of newcomer students — many of whom fled the war in Ukraine — registering in public schools across the province has prompted Manitoba to designate more dollars for interpreters and other K-12 settlement services.

Grade 9 student Michael Babych is among the hundreds of pupils learning in Winnipeg classrooms located a long way from the ones they were in before fleeing their war-torn homes.

The 14-year-old and his mother are from Zaporizhzhia, in southeast Ukraine. They sought refuge first in Hungary, then Ireland and, finally, Canada, where they have made a home since March; Michael’s father stayed behind to fight for their country.

“The hardest thing is a new life… and school, and the English language,” the high schooler said, with translation support from an administrator at Collège Miles Macdonell Collegiate Monday.

Monday, Nov. 7, 2022

Grade 9 student Michael Babych and his mother are from Zaporizhzhia, in southeast Ukraine. His father stayed behind to fight for their country. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

U of M files lawsuit over $45-M Innovation Hub

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

U of M files lawsuit over $45-M Innovation Hub

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Friday, Nov. 4, 2022

The University of Manitoba is suing the consultant and construction firms that worked on its $45-million Smartpark Innovation Hub, a roughly 75,000-square-foot facility on the Fort Garry campus, over allegations of “structural and mechanical deficiencies.”

The information exchange centre located at 100 Innovation Dr. was built to be a space that encourages partnerships between industry, government and Manitoba’s largest university and houses the budding projects that come out of those collaborations.

The hub opened to much fanfare in June 2019. North Forge Technology Exchange, which supports entrepreneurs via mentorships and other resources to launch advanced manufacturing startups, is one of the current tenants.

While the facility remains open, a statement of claim recently filed at the Court of King’s Bench suggests significant building code concerns have come up since the university issued a request for proposals to construct the hub in July 2016.

Friday, Nov. 4, 2022

A statement of claim filed at the Court of King’s Bench suggests significant building code concerns have come up since the university issued a request for proposals to construct the hub in July 2016. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press files)

Manitoba explores U.S.-style university funding

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

Manitoba explores U.S.-style university funding

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Thursday, Nov. 3, 2022

Manitoba appears set to radically change the way universities and colleges are funded, by switching to a popular model in the U.S. that requires schools to report achievement data and meet specific goals in exchange for operating dollars.

Consultations about “performance benchmarks” remain underway, but school leaders, faculty members and student groups are again raising concerns about the Tory government’s plan to update traditional lump-sum funding.

“Developing and implementing a set of performance benchmarks is intended to ensure greater financial oversight and accountability for public funding,” states an excerpt from a consultation guide recently put out by the advanced education department.

The guide, sent to stakeholders in late September, details how the province is collecting feedback to create its so-called post-secondary accountability framework. Data on student admission and progression, graduate outcomes, and institutional efficiency and effectiveness are all under consideration as the province searches for metrics to measure.

Thursday, Nov. 3, 2022

JOE BRYKSA/WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

University of Manitoba in Winnipeg.

Manitoba mulls teacher-misconduct registry, college of educators

Maggie Macintosh and Katrina Clarke 6 minute read Preview

Manitoba mulls teacher-misconduct registry, college of educators

Maggie Macintosh and Katrina Clarke 6 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022

Manitoba is considering the creation of both a teacher registry and an independent body or college of educators to improve accountability and transparency related to educator misconduct in K-12 schools.

But the province has made no firm commitments to change.

On Wednesday — hours after the Canadian Centre for Child Protection released a scathing report highlighting the absence of transparency around educator misconduct in Manitoba — the Stefanson government revealed details about its plans to address and prevent malpractice.

“When you talk about either an independent (body) or a college, those are a couple options that we’re going to be speaking to our education partners on… to ensure our children and youth are safe right here in Manitoba,” said Education Minister Wayne Ewasko.

Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Education Minister Wayne Ewasko said, in a news release, consultations will be held with all relevant stakeholders to get perspectives from students, parents, guardians, teachers and school administrators.

Northern First Nations demand heath-care centre, decry suicide crises

Maggie Macintosh 6 minute read Preview

Northern First Nations demand heath-care centre, decry suicide crises

Maggie Macintosh 6 minute read Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022

Island Lake leaders say “a pandemic of suffering” is plaguing their fly-in communities and the only way to stop suicide crises in the northern First Nations is to build a regional health centre so preventative and primary care is available close to home.

Chiefs from ⁠Red Sucker Lake, Garden Hill, Wasagamack and St. Theresa Point held a news conference Wednesday in Winnipeg to raise awareness about the dire state of mental health among their more than 15,000 residents.

Anishininew Okimawin Grand Chief Scott Harper, who oversees the First Nations’ grand council, told reporters self-harm, addictions and other severe mental health challenges are daily concerns in all four communities he represents.

In Harper’s home community of Red Sucker Lake, there have been two recent deaths by suicide and at least 17 attempts. On Oct. 20, the First Nation declared a state of emergency over the mental health crisis and serious need for support workers.

Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Island Lake leaders say “a pandemic of suffering” is plaguing their fly-in communities and the only way to stop suicide crises in the northern First Nations is to build a regional health centre so preventative and primary care is available close to home.

Anti-LGBTTQ+ handout sours Halloween spirit

Maggie Macintosh 2 minute read Preview

Anti-LGBTTQ+ handout sours Halloween spirit

Maggie Macintosh 2 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022

Young trick-or-treaters in the Charleswood neighbourhood received a handout outlining radical anti-LGBTTQ+ material on Halloween.

“It makes me upset and confused,” said Winnipeg middle-years student Rhowyn Hosler, who was among those that discovered the unusual item gifted to costumed children Monday.

“I still don’t understand why people can’t just mind their own business. If people identify as something that’s outside the gender norm — like when people are trans or non-binary or gender fluid — it doesn’t affect you.”

The 13-year-old, who is non-binary, said they asked their mother what the paper from Action4Canada was after reading some of the disturbing material.

Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022

JUSTIN TANG / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILES

Young trick-or-treaters in the Charleswood neighbourhood received a handout outlining radical anti-LGBTTQ+ material on Halloween.

Winnipeg police warn of cannabis candy amid Halloween treats

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

Winnipeg police warn of cannabis candy amid Halloween treats

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022

Cannabis candies — pre-packaged along with regular chocolate bars in zipped plastic baggies — were found in at least a half-dozen stashes of Halloween treats collected by children in Winnipeg’s South Tuxedo neighbourhood.

The Winnipeg Police Service is warning families to inspect their trick-or-treat collections for any “Medicated Nerds,” THC edibles packaged in branding that imitates a popular confectionery brand and is illegal in Canada.

In a public advisory Tuesday, police confirmed a minimum of six reports about the product were made to authorities between the evening of Oct. 31 and morning of Nov. 1.

A map provided by officials shows the reported items are all connected to a residential area located near the intersection of Grant Avenue and Kenaston Boulevard.

Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Cannabis candies — pre-packaged along with regular chocolate bars in zipped plastic baggies — were found in at least a half-dozen stashes of Halloween treats.

Klein sets sights on legislature after mayoral bid fizzles

Maggie Macintosh 2 minute read Preview

Klein sets sights on legislature after mayoral bid fizzles

Maggie Macintosh 2 minute read Friday, Oct. 28, 2022

Days after losing his bid for mayor, Kevin Klein has launched another political campaign — this time, to represent the Tories in the race for Kirkfield Park.

The former city councillor for Charleswood-Tuxedo-Westwood announced he is seeking the Progressive Conservative nomination for the vacant constituency on Friday.

Citing his advocacy in fighting to save the John Blumberg Golf Course, installing flashing lights on Bedson and supporting parks and paths in the area, Klein said in a news release that he has a strong record of tackling local issues.

The career businessman added he would bring the same “passion for the community” he held throughout his tenure on city council to the Manitoba legislature.

Friday, Oct. 28, 2022

JESSICA LEE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS files

Days after losing his bid for mayor, Kevin Klein has launched another political campaign — this time, to represent the Tories in the race for Kirkfield Park.

Winnipeg students picked Murray in mock election

Maggie Macintosh 3 minute read Preview

Winnipeg students picked Murray in mock election

Maggie Macintosh 3 minute read Friday, Oct. 28, 2022

Glen Murray, the runner-up in the Winnipeg mayoral race, had been the favourite to take the reins at city hall among students who participated in mock elections this week.

In the lead-up to official polls closing Wednesday, more than 9,400 learners from 78 schools in the Manitoba capital cast imitation ballots for the candidates they hoped real voters would pick to run the city.

“School is a place to start promoting (the democratic) process, so that as these students come of age to vote, they are standing up for their values and finding people that represent their values,” said Kurt Hangle, a Grade 9 teacher-adviser in the Exchange District.

The Met Centre for Arts and Technology, an alternative high school in the city core, was among the institutions that took part in the Student Vote initiative.

Friday, Oct. 28, 2022

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

The Met Centre for Arts and Technology, an alternative high school in the city core, was among the institutions that took part in the Student Vote initiative.

School divisions awash with rookie trustees

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

School divisions awash with rookie trustees

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022

Rookie school trustees — six of whom mounted successful campaigns that took out incumbents, including officials who have served for two decades — have earned more than half of all seats on Winnipeg’s public K-12 boards.

Fifty-two per cent of the incoming trustees in Winnipeg, River East Transcona, Seven Oaks, Louis Riel, Pembina Trails and St. James-Assiniboia are new.

Newbie Evan Krosney said he felt “excellent” after a long campaign ended with him becoming the first member of Gen Z to be elected to public office in the city.

“We were victorious, but we were also first with the most votes of any trustee in Seven Oaks,” said the 25-year-old, who credited his hardworking team of volunteers who knocked on thousands of doors leading up to election day.

Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022

Lois Brothers is among a group of nominees who mounted well-organized campaigns with similar themes. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press files)

Gillingham celebrates, Murray concedes, Klein and Loney round out top four

Carol Sanders, Joyanne Pursaga, Ryan Thorpe and Maggie Macintosh 9 minute read Preview

Gillingham celebrates, Murray concedes, Klein and Loney round out top four

Carol Sanders, Joyanne Pursaga, Ryan Thorpe and Maggie Macintosh 9 minute read Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2022

Scott Gillingham, a two-term city councillor and former Pentecostal pastor, has pulled off a win in a mayoral race in which he seemed destined to finish second — and it was a squeaker.

Polls done earlier in the campaign had put Glen Murray, who was mayor of the city from 1998 to 2004, well out in front of the pack of 11 contenders.

But Gillingham, the top right-leaning candidate, benefited from Murray’s campaign missteps, including his flip-flop on taxes, and fallout from workplace harassment accusations stemming from his time at Alberta-based Pembina Institute a few years ago.

The full slate of candidates included former MP Robert-Falcon Ouellette, former Manitoba Liberal leader Rana Bokhari, consultant Jenny Motkaluk, businessman Rick Shone, security company owner Don Woodstock, engineer Idris Adelakun and grocery store worker Chris Clacio.

Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

'I’m going to reflect a lot on this experience. Politics has changed… You are much more vulnerable as a public person (now),' Glen Murray said.