Maggie Macintosh

Maggie Macintosh

Reporter

Maggie Macintosh got her start in journalism delivering newspapers door-to-door with a wagon she wheeled around her Hamilton, Ont. neighbourhood.

A decade later, in December 2017, she joined the Winnipeg Free Press team as an intern. That’s when she got her first front-page story in a daily, frostbite and, fairly quickly, fell for Winnipeg — a city just as gritty and underestimated as the one she’s from.

Maggie returned to the newsroom the following summer, before her final year at Ryerson’s School of Journalism in Toronto and again, after she graduated. She started as a full-time reporter the same day she turned 22.

Prior to packing her bags for Winnipeg, Maggie worked stints at CBC Toronto, CBC Radio and CBC Calgary. She was a 2019 recipient of the CBC News Joan Donaldson Scholarship. Her work has also been published in The Hamilton Spectator.

When she’s not making cold calls, Maggie calls line on the ice as a skip. During the off-season, she can be spotted on her bike or with a picnic and a paperback in Assiniboine Park.

Maggie is a bilingual English/French journalist who appreciates alliteration and tips on anything education-related. Contrary to popular assumption, if she were a teacher, she’d prefer a Granny Smith on her desk on the first day of school.

Funding for the Free Press education reporter comes from the Government of Canada through the Local Journalism Initiative.

Recent articles of Maggie Macintosh

Study tracks Winnipeg teachers’ well-being during COVID-19 pandemic

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Study tracks Winnipeg teachers’ well-being during COVID-19 pandemic

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Yesterday at 7:00 PM CDT

From feelings of accomplishment to complete desensitization, Winnipeg teachers’ state of well-being is “all over the map” after two and a half years of instructing during the COVID-19 pandemic.

University of Winnipeg’s Laura Sokal and Lesley Trudel began surveying teachers about their stress levels and coping mechanisms in the spring of 2020.

The researcher duo initially launched a national survey to gauge resiliency and later, recruited 20 public school teachers to participate in a local case study involving bi-weekly interviews throughout 2020-21.

Yesterday at 7:00 PM CDT

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

The latest data, collected in late May and early June, shows some teachers feel cynical, desensitized and are unsure about whether they want to continue their career in education.

Academics urge feds to boost supports

Maggie Macintosh, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter 4 minute read Preview

Academics urge feds to boost supports

Maggie Macintosh, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter 4 minute read Yesterday at 3:00 AM CDT

Citing surging inflation and stipends that have remained frozen for nearly 20 years, Manitoba academics are calling on Ottawa to top-up awards for early-career researchers in science and engineering fields so they can earn a livable wage.

More than 130 local signatories have added their name to the Support Our Science petition.

The national campaign, which hosted a rally on Parliament Hill on Thursday, is lobbying the federal government to increase funding for graduate students and postdoctoral scholars — in particular, scholarships under the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

“We are forcing the best and brightest young scientists to either live below the poverty line, leave Canada to get training in another country where they give a more reasonable level of support, or quit science altogether,” Marc Johnson, a biology professor at the University of Toronto, said.

Yesterday at 3:00 AM CDT

SUPPLIED

PhD student Mikala Epp said she typically works between two to five part-time jobs throughout the year, in addition to being a full-time researcher at the University of Manitoba.

Loney wants city to be leader in solar energy

Maggie Macintosh 3 minute read Preview

Loney wants city to be leader in solar energy

Maggie Macintosh 3 minute read Friday, Aug. 12, 2022

Branding himself as the most environmentally conscious candidate in Winnipeg’s crowded mayoral race, Shaun Loney says he wants to install solar panels on city hall and make it easier for residents and business owners to convert to green energy.

On Friday, Loney, a self-described “social entrepreneur,” published a plan outlining eight steps to make Winnipeg a leader in solar energy.

“We’re one of the sunniest cities in Canada,” he said, during an interview outside a Red River College Polytechnic building equipped with state-of-art solar panels in the Exchange District.

“We can capitalize on, not just the environmental benefits, not just the job-creating potential of solar, but also reducing our utility bills on a go-forward basis.”

Friday, Aug. 12, 2022

MAGGIE MACINTOSH / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Mayoral candidate Shaun Loney is positioning himself as the green candidate in the crowded race for Winnipeg’s top job.

Pembina Trails gears up for busing blueprint alterations

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Pembina Trails gears up for busing blueprint alterations

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Thursday, Aug. 11, 2022

Busing changes in the Pembina Trails School Division will result in new start and dismissal times across south Winnipeg in 2023-24, but senior administration says schedules are unlikely to extend beyond the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

In a June 29 email, superintendent Ted Fransen informed families the division would be updating its transportation model for “increased fleet utilization and efficiency.”

The division’s overall population growth and quirks of some new neighbourhood developments have resulted in unprecedented demand for busing, Fransen wrote.

Pembina Trails’ response is to create new central pick-up spots, on feeder streets, wherever possible, in turn reducing total stops per trip so students spend less time in transit and drivers can service more than one route.

Thursday, Aug. 11, 2022

MIKE SUDOMA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

The division’s overall population growth and quirks of some new neighbourhood developments have resulted in unprecedented demand for busing, says superintendent Ted Fransen.

‘Kids are helping each other’: hockey-linked student mental health initiative expands reach

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

‘Kids are helping each other’: hockey-linked student mental health initiative expands reach

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2022

As teenagers grapple with the fallout of COVID-19 lockdowns and ongoing health concerns, Project 11 is expanding its high school curriculum’s reach to equip more students with strategies to manage mental wellness and build resilience.

Last year, True North Youth Foundation recruited upwards of 70 teachers across the province to take part in a pilot of its new mental health lesson plan for grades 9-12 students.

Known as Project 11, the initiative — a tribute to professional hockey player Rick Rypien, who was slated to wear No. 11 for the Winnipeg Jets before he died of suicide in 2011 — was first rolled out to elementary school students in 2013.

Rypien wanted students to receive mental health education and reduce overall stigma surrounding the topic. All of the teachers involved in the project have been carrying out those goals.

Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2022

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

Heather Blacker and her grade four students at Brooklands School works on a lesson for "Project 11" a True North Initiative. This lesson was on conflict resolution. February 7, 2018

Brandon University paid over $41,000 in legal fees over sexual harassment scandal

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Brandon University paid over $41,000 in legal fees over sexual harassment scandal

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2022

Brandon University’s botched investigation into allegations of sexual harassment against a soccer coach not only harmed student athletes and tarnished the school’s reputation, but it also cost the post-secondary institute upwards of $41,000 in legal fees.

“It’s $41,000 too much,” said Christopher Schneider, a sociology professor at BU. “If they would’ve done (an investigation) right the first time, they wouldn’t have had to spend any money.”

That figure is only a starting point when it comes to financial losses related to the mishandling of complaints about Jesse Roziere, Schneider said, noting it does not include payouts to soccer players affected by the drawn-out process.

Last summer, a group of young women approached the Free Press with concerns their university was brushing off complaints about Roziere, now 30, and failing to protect them so they could continue representing the Bobcats.

Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2022

Brandon Sun Brandon University will be consulting with Indigenous Knowledge Keeper for a potential name of the university’s strategic plan. File Photo

Indigenous single mom studying at university builds support hub for like-minded parents

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Indigenous single mom studying at university builds support hub for like-minded parents

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Monday, Aug. 8, 2022

Kelly Kristin couldn’t find classmates who related to her challenges as an Indigenous mother raising a young child while attending university, so she ventured beyond her Winnipeg campus to create a support hub for like-minded parents.

One year later, Kristin is celebrating the growth of Indigenous Parents Community — a not-for-profit she launched in the fall of 2021 to connect mature students and recent graduates who are balancing their caregiving responsibilities with career aspirations.

“I would describe it as a community that is there for the Indigenous parents to feel at home, so they can develop their personal and professional skills,” said the founder of IPC.

“We’ll cheer you on when you have an exam. We’ll cheer you on, even if you fail.… It’s a community of support, no matter what you’re going through.”

Monday, Aug. 8, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Kelly Kristin, founder of Indigenous Parents Community, in front of her home in Winnipeg.

School divisions’ new leaders walked similar paths to top job

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

School divisions’ new leaders walked similar paths to top job

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022

Aside from their recent promotions to each oversee the education of more than 15,000 public school pupils, Winnipeg’s two newest chief superintendents have an uncanny amount in common.

Lisa Boles and Sandra Herbst shared a childhood dream that in turn led them to set up a home classroom and recruit a younger sibling to be their first respective student.

“For as long as I can remember, I always knew I wanted to be a teacher. My sister endured being my student for many years. My stuffed animals, (too),” said Herbst, who is now at the helm of the River East Transcona School Division.

The incoming superintendent of Pembina Trails School Division has a similar origin story. Boles recalled her younger self, equipped with a chalkboard and desk, attempting to teach her brother to read.

Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022

Lisa Boles has spent more than 30 years working in public education in south Winnipeg. As a teacher, she taught math and science to junior high and high schools and coached volleyball and softball. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

Construction company fined for workplace injury

Maggie Macintosh 2 minute read Preview

Construction company fined for workplace injury

Maggie Macintosh 2 minute read Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022

The owner of a Beausejour-based construction company has been fined $18,500 by the province, after an employee suffered a spinal fracture in a workplace accident.

In a news release Thursday, the provincial government issued a reminder to employers to ensure staff members are “appropriately trained and supervised” in the wake of a recent Workplace Safety and Health Act violation.

The release outlines an incident that occurred July 16, when an employee of Sandhill Construction was helping install rafters on a two-storey garage in the Rural Municipality of Alexander.

“The worker was working on the top platform of a movable steel scaffold on the second floor when five of the rafters, not yet secured to the top girder, began to fall in a domino effect. One of the rafters struck the scaffold and caused the worker to fall approximately 10 feet to the plywood surface below, resulting in a spinal fracture,” according to Manitoba Labour, Consumer Protection and Government Services.

Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022

The owner of a Beausejour-based construction company has been fined $18,500 by the province, after an employee suffered a spinal fracture in a workplace accident.

In a news release Thursday, the provincial government issued a reminder to employers to ensure staff members are “appropriately trained and supervised” in the wake of a recent Workplace Safety and Health Act violation.

The release outlines an incident that occurred July 16, when an employee of Sandhill Construction was helping install rafters on a two-storey garage in the Rural Municipality of Alexander.

“The worker was working on the top platform of a movable steel scaffold on the second floor when five of the rafters, not yet secured to the top girder, began to fall in a domino effect. One of the rafters struck the scaffold and caused the worker to fall approximately 10 feet to the plywood surface below, resulting in a spinal fracture,” according to Manitoba Labour, Consumer Protection and Government Services.

Klein kicks off mayoral campaign

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Klein kicks off mayoral campaign

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022

If he wins the keys to the Winnipeg mayor’s office, Kevin Klein says developing more parks, staffing Transit buses with security officers, and ending closed-door city council meetings at 510 Main St. will be at the top of his agenda.

A career businessman, who has spent the last four years building his reputation as an outspoken councillor for Charleswood-Tuxedo-Westwood, Klein unveiled the key pillars in his campaign for the City of Winnipeg’s top job Wednesday.

During an afternoon event at Assiniboine Park, Klein told a crowd of roughly 75 they would get a safer and greener Winnipeg if they vote for him and he’s successful in the Oct. 26 election.

“If this is what you really, really want in your city — if you want to be proud of your city, if you want to be comfortable taking the bus… This is your election, and this is your chance,” said Klein, flanked by his wife.

Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022

JESSICA LEE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Mayoral candidate Kevin Klein speaks during his campaign launch at Assiniboine Park while his wife Heather stands beside him.

Province announces annual funding for Bear Clan

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Province announces annual funding for Bear Clan

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2022

The Bear Clan will start to receive annual government funding for the first time, Manitoba’s justice minister announced Tuesday — before he joined a pack of volunteers for an evening patrol of streets in the North End.

Steinbach MLA Kelvin Goertzen, who oversees the justice file, visited the inner-city safety initiative’s Selkirk Avenue den to tout the province’s commitment to providing $100,000 annually to support operations and ensure the organization has predictable funding in the future.

Treasurer Brian Chrupalo said the core funding is a first of its kind for the Bear Clan.

The community organization typically relies on donations and grants from all levels of government in order to equip staff and volunteers with items ranging from sunscreen to sandwiches to hand-out to community members throughout patrols.

Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Justice minister Kelvin Goertzen (right) toured the community with Bear Clan executive director Kevin Walker and other volunteers on Tuesday after announcing $100,000 in annual funding for the organization.

Saying ‘Tansi’ to new school year

Maggie Macintosh, Local Journalism Initiative reporter 4 minute read Preview

Saying ‘Tansi’ to new school year

Maggie Macintosh, Local Journalism Initiative reporter 4 minute read Monday, Aug. 1, 2022

A Winnipeg teacher wants her colleagues to welcome their students in Indigenous languages on the first day of school — and the following 185 days in the 2022-23 calendar.

Michelle Arnaud has been assigning herself homework throughout her summer because, as far as she is concerned, “decolonizing education” is unending work that does not stop when the final bell rings in June.

The high school educator’s latest project is a virtual agenda that features beginner terms in Cree, Michif, Anishinaabe, Dakota and Oji-Cree.

When incoming ninth graders enter her classroom on Sept. 7, they will be greeted by a projected slide bearing the words: tansi (“hello, how are you?” in Cree), nisto kîsikâw (“it is Wednesday” in Cree) and aabitoose (“halfway” in Ojibwa).

Monday, Aug. 1, 2022

SUPPLIED

Grade 9 teacher Michelle Arnaud is learning Cree to reclaim the language that her great-grandmother was punished for speaking in school. The math and science educator wants to incorporate her new language knowledge into her classroom.

Winnipeg Free Press 2022

Pandemic classroom coverage ‘feeding frenzy’ for substitute teachers

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

Pandemic classroom coverage ‘feeding frenzy’ for substitute teachers

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Saturday, Jul. 30, 2022

A child has immediately burst into tears when Holly Harris walked into their classroom — on more than one occasion over the last two school years.

“Of course, you don’t take it personally,” said the substitute teacher, as she recalled what it has been like to fill-in for ill and absent educators throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. “The kids just couldn’t cope with any more change in their lives.”

Harris, 61, hosted an hour-long lecture Thursday titled Classroom Confidential at Winnipeg’s Gwen Secter Creative Living Centre.

Throughout her presentation, she spoke about addressing high levels of anxiety among students of all levels as they adapted to changing public health orders and her respect for all of the full-time employees in the K-12 system.

Saturday, Jul. 30, 2022

The Manitoba Teachers’ Society has long raised concerns about a severe shortage of certified substitute teachers.

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

Mother files human rights complaint

Maggie Macintosh 3 minute read Preview

Mother files human rights complaint

Maggie Macintosh 3 minute read Thursday, Jul. 28, 2022

A Winnipeg mother has filed a human rights complaint alleging that Calvin Christian School’s elementary principal discriminated against her son by asking him to leave his rainbow flag at home and failed to protect him from homophobia.

“Kids shouldn’t be singled out at school and be told that they shouldn’t talk about being gay… and that it’s their fault other kids on the playground are teasing them for it,” said Jennaya Isaac, who has four children, including 12-year-old Kaiden Isaac.

Isaac said she is following through with the time-intensive process of making a report to the Manitoba Human Rights Commission because of her frustration about how Kaiden, who recently finished Grade 5, has been treated at the private religious school.

Principal John Sawatzky’s mid-June apology to the family regarding the handling of incidents related to Kaiden waving a rainbow banner at recess came far too late, in the wake of repeated requests from the school board and news reports about the issue, according to the mother.

Thursday, Jul. 28, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Jennaya Isaac filed a human rights complaint with the Manitoba Human Rights Commission because of her frustration about how her son Kaiden has been treated at Calvin Christian School.

Raising a stink over wastewater

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

Raising a stink over wastewater

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Tuesday, Jul. 26, 2022

Environmentalists and property owners along the Brokenhead River are raising red flags about Beausejour’s plan to dump heavy wastewater from a new treatment plant into a channel that has many rare species, and is popular for swimming and fishing.

“A river should not be dumping grounds for anyone. Water is a basic human right and this was just written off completely. None of our concerns were taken into account,” said Aliza Delwar, who lives part-time at a residence near the River’s Edge Golf Course.

The Manitoba Water Services Board accepted a construction company’s $12.4-million bid to build the facility last month. The province had approved the proposal to upgrade the town’s water system to serve the growing population in late 2020.

The site will use a purification process known as reverse osmosis. Liquid will be filtered through a microporous membrane to separate usable water and concentrate; the latter — reject minerals, metals and organics — will be dumped into the Brokenhead River.

Tuesday, Jul. 26, 2022

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Liquid will be filtered through a microporous membrane to eliminate usable water and concentrate, which will be dumped into the Brokenhead River.

Back to the basics for ‘COVID kids’

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

Back to the basics for ‘COVID kids’

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Monday, Jul. 25, 2022

“Sharing is caring” — a lesson many young children are grappling with because their introduction to school involved physical distancing, masking and an emphasis on independent study — is a fundamental principle in Justine Baxa’s classroom this summer.

Baxa, 19, said her goal as an instructor at Community School Investigators, better known as CSI, is to introduce her campers to as much group work as possible throughout their vacation.

“They are ‘COVID kids,’” she said, noting the majority of her students will start Grade 1, 2 or 3 at Shaughnessy Park School after Labour Day. “They don’t know how to talk to each other. They want to grab. They want to do (activities) by themselves.”

Monday, Jul. 25, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Instructor Justine Baxa helps kids at CSI (Community School Investigators) summer learning loss camp for inner-city kids at Shaughnessy Park School in Winnipeg.

U of M opens research doors to Ukrainian scholars fleeing war

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

U of M opens research doors to Ukrainian scholars fleeing war

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Friday, Jul. 22, 2022

Natella Roskoshna spent much of the winter preparing to take on a teaching gig at her alma mater, Karazin Kharkiv National University — until one morning in late February, when she was jolted awake at 5 a.m. to “a huge vibration and a very loud sound.”

Bombings and related commotion became the soundtrack of her life, as Russian forces attacked Kharkiv, Ukraine. When her university’s law faculty building turned to rubble, Roskoshna and academic and husband Illia Roskoshnyi began panicked job searches.

“We didn’t know what to do, and we realized we needed to continue our life. You never know when the rocket will hit next,” she said.

The couple arrived in Manitoba at the end of May, making them the first of a group of 20 Ukrainian scholars who will resume research at the University of Manitoba while Russia’s war on their home country rages on.

Friday, Jul. 22, 2022

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Natella Roskoshna and her husband arrived in Manitoba at the end of May,

U of W Indigenous course requirement changing student attitudes: study

Maggie Macintosh 7 minute read Preview

U of W Indigenous course requirement changing student attitudes: study

Maggie Macintosh 7 minute read Thursday, Jul. 21, 2022

The University of Winnipeg’s Indigenous course requirement is deepening student awareness about ongoing injustices tied to settler colonialism, research shows — but the authors of a new report warn not all graduates are grasping decolonization as unending work.

Since the fall of 2016, incoming undergraduate learners at the U of W have had to take at least one class on Indigenous histories, cultures or matters in order to graduate.

The policy, among the first of its kind in the country, was introduced after students pitched it to combat anti-Indigenous racism on campus.

There are approximately 90 classes that have been vetted to ensure: content is primarily Indigenous and based in North America, if not Canada; the syllabus incorporates First Nations, Métis and Inuit resources; and an instructor is prepared to offer high-quality education.

Thursday, Jul. 21, 2022

ETHAN CAIRNS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
The findings of researcher duo, Jeremy Siemens and Katelin Neufeld, suggest student knowledge and attitudes about stereotypes change for the better after the completion of a course that aims to educate learners on ongoing injustices against Indigenous peoples in Canada.

U of M sticks with mask mandate

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

U of M sticks with mask mandate

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Thursday, Jul. 21, 2022

Most post-secondary institutes in the province have eased COVID-19 protocols, but Manitoba’s largest university will require visitors to continue wearing high-quality and well-fitted masks inside campus buildings in the fall.

The University of Manitoba announced this month its mask mandate will remain intact when students and academics begin the 2022-23 academic year with a widespread return of face-to-face learning.

“We are beginning to see discussions in a number of provinces about preparations for possible additional (COVID-19) surges in fall. As a result, we have decided that the existing masking mandate will continue in September,” states a notice on the U of M website.

While KN95 masks are “highly recommended,” visitors will be permitted to wear three-ply medical masks. Both types of face coverings will be available at campus distribution sites.

Thursday, Jul. 21, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
Masked students study in the University Centre on campus at the University of Manitoba in February. The university will require visitors wear masks inside campus buildings when classes resume in the fall.

Manitoba seeks K-12 curriculum evaluation consultant

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Preview

Manitoba seeks K-12 curriculum evaluation consultant

Maggie Macintosh 4 minute read Tuesday, Jul. 19, 2022

A provincial job posting for a consultant to evaluate K-12 curricula and assess how teachers are using it in classrooms is raising eyebrows among educators.

The Manitoba government recently issued a request for proposal to create a system that will monitor how curriculum is implemented across four official school programs: English, French, French immersion, and senior years technology. A quarter-of-a-million dollars has been set aside for the contract.

There is currently no formal set-up in place to measure and report on the effectiveness of course content or understand how a syllabus is taught in every corner of the province, according to the RFP.

“The development of such a system is essential to understanding when and what in our curriculums needs to be reviewed and what supports are required for high-quality implementation,” states an excerpt, which was made public via Merx, a contract and tender site, July 11.

Tuesday, Jul. 19, 2022

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
James Bedford, president of the Manitoba Teachers’ Society, said he is curious about why the province is reaching outside of the education department for expertise and how genuine consultation will be.

Getting connected: northern schools switch to Musk’s internet technology

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

Getting connected: northern schools switch to Musk’s internet technology

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Monday, Jul. 18, 2022

New satellite dishes are Frontier School Division’s solution to the digital divide in rural and remote classrooms across northern Manitoba — a long-standing issue that became even more dire at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

One year ago, the division, which oversees the education of roughly 6,700 students — many of whom live in communities where internet access is unreliable or doesn’t exist — officially installed its first Starlink saucer and connected to the accompanying network.

Sixteen schools can now access the internet via the up-and-coming aerospace technology.

Monday, Jul. 18, 2022

SUPPLIED
San Antonio School, an elementary building in Bissett, Man. was among the first in the Frontier School Division to install a Starlink satellite dish to improve both access and quality of internet in the learning community.

Student loan program streamlined

Maggie Macintosh 2 minute read Preview

Student loan program streamlined

Maggie Macintosh 2 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 13, 2022

The Manitoba government is touting an update to student aid operations as a move that will reduce red tape and make both loan management and repayment easier for users.

Amendments to the Student Aid Regulation harmonize its provisions with the requirements of the Canada Student Financial Assistance Program, the province announced Wednesday.

Manitoba’s regulation has been updated to enhance disability provisions for students and eliminate the restriction that limits funding to one diploma, certificate or degree, among other reasons, officials said.

“Integrating the provincial and federal loan programs will help streamline and simplify the administration of student loans, improving services for more than 47,000 borrowers,” Advanced Education Minister Jon Reyes said in a prepared release.

Wednesday, Jul. 13, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
“Integrating the provincial and federal loan programs will help streamline and simplify the administration of student loans, improving services for more than 47,000 borrowers,” Advanced Education Minister Jon Reyes said in a prepared release.

Steinbach teacher accused of sexually assaulting students

Maggie Macintosh 6 minute read Preview

Steinbach teacher accused of sexually assaulting students

Maggie Macintosh 6 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 13, 2022

A Manitoba teacher, now charged with sexually assaulting several of his female students, has taught at four schools since 2018 — a work history that has RCMP concerned there may be more victims.

Police took the unusual steps of immediately naming an educator accused of sexual misconduct and publishing his detailed employment history.

David Bueti, an educator from Winnipeg, is facing five counts of sexual assault and three counts of sexual interference, a charge related to unwanted touching and grooming behaviour.

Wednesday, Jul. 13, 2022

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
David Bueti is alleged to have started inappropriately touching teenage girls almost immediately after he started working at Steinbach Regional Secondary School in February.

Alt high school for tech-savvy teens marks graduation of first class

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Preview

Alt high school for tech-savvy teens marks graduation of first class

Maggie Macintosh 5 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 13, 2022

There were glitches along the way, but Pembina Trails Early College — a new alternative high school that marries traditional instruction with college-level computer programming and cybersecurity training — is celebrating its inaugural graduates.

David Moyer and 17 of his peers, all of whom have been honing sought-after skills in Manitoba’s booming digital media industry, were joined by teachers and family members to collect their Grade 12 diplomas at an intimate convocation late last month.

“I’m told that (‘we’re making history’) constantly,” said David, 17. “Overall, it’s been an amazing experience to be the first people to set an example of what students can do when taught with tech.”

PTEC is delivered to students free of charge by the Pembina Trails School Division and Manitoba Institute of Trades and Technology, in partnership with Tech Manitoba.

Wednesday, Jul. 13, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
David Moyer recently graduated from the Pembina Trails Early College program (PTEC) and is in the first week of a seven week internship at Bit Space Development (BSD).