Mikaela MacKenzie

Mikaela MacKenzie

Photojournalist

Mikaela MacKenzie loves meeting people, experiencing new things, and learning something every day. That’s what drove her to pursue a career as a visual journalist — photographers get a hands-on, boots-on-the-ground look at the world.

Sharing stories through the lens inspires her. After graduating from the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, Mikaela interned at the Free Press before spending some time abroad travelling and in Toronto as a videographer for Rogers publications.

When an opportunity arose at the Free Press, she was thrilled to come back to the prairie newsroom.

Mikaela quickly made her mark, winning an EPPY for best sports video and an NPAC award for best single multimedia project within her first year at the Free Press.

She thinks it’s a pretty fantastic job to have, which is why you’ll almost always see her with a smile on her face and a camera in hand.

Recent articles of Mikaela MacKenzie

In pictures: Truth and Reconciliation Day in Winnipeg

Mike Deal and Mikaela MacKenzie 1 minute read Preview

In pictures: Truth and Reconciliation Day in Winnipeg

Mike Deal and Mikaela MacKenzie 1 minute read Friday, Sep. 30, 2022

Since 2013, Sept. 30 has been known as Orange Shirt Day, to honour the children who survived Canada’s Indian residential schools and to remember those who did not return home.

The date is now also the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, which asks all Canadians to reflect upon relationships with Indigenous people, remember the harms of the past, and focus on ways to commit to healthy and positive growth throughout all communities today.

Events marking Truth and Reconciliation Day took place around Winnipeg today.  Here's how it looked. |

Friday, Sep. 30, 2022

Hundreds of people march through the streets in Winnipeg on Friday. (John Woods / The Canadian Press)

Hockey takes centre stage at Rainbow Stage production

Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 1 minute read Preview

Hockey takes centre stage at Rainbow Stage production

Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 1 minute read Thursday, Jun. 30, 2022

The winters of my childhood were long, long seasons. We lived in three places — the school, the church and the skating-rink — but our life was on the skating-rink.

So begins Roch Carrier’s beloved book The Hockey Sweater, which recounts his childhood memory and the furor that arose following the unintended delivery of a Toronto Maple Leafs jersey to his home in Quebec, where Maurice ‘Rocket’ Richard and the Montreal Canadiens ruled.

The classic tale later became a widely popular National Film Board animated short and was adapted for the stage.

The musical production kicks off Rainbow Stage’s season.

Thursday, Jun. 30, 2022

Yasmine Ravandi makes a save.

Arbor Day 2022

Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 1 minute read Preview

Arbor Day 2022

Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 1 minute read Friday, Jun. 3, 2022

Arbor Day is Saturday, June 4 at Kildonan Park. 

Trees Winnipeg will hand out nearly 2,000 trees, involving 25 species, to those who purchased them through the ReLeaf program, which sells affordable quality tree packages that count for the city's Million Tree Challenge.

Guests can also get a bird’s-eye view from the tallest trees in the park by learning how to safely climb a tree or get a lift in a bucket truck. |

Friday, Jun. 3, 2022

Matt Vinet, Arbor Day chair for Trees Winnipeg.

Winnipeg-born Michael Rubenfeld helping to keep Ukraine’s broken hearts beating through art

Melissa Martin / Photography by Mikaela MacKenzie 13 minute read Preview

Winnipeg-born Michael Rubenfeld helping to keep Ukraine’s broken hearts beating through art

Melissa Martin / Photography by Mikaela MacKenzie 13 minute read Monday, Apr. 18, 2022

KRAKOW — On Feb. 15, nine days before Russia invaded Ukraine, Oksana Pyzh and her husband packed up their kid, their car and a few of their things, and began the long drive west from their home in Kharkiv, towards Poland, stopping every few hours along the way. A leisurely pace, compared to the flight of those who came after, but there were no bombs then.

Still, it was obvious to Pyzh that something bad was about to happen. Russia was massing its troops on the border. Foreign countries were moving diplomats out of Kyiv and U.S. President Joe Biden warned of an imminent invasion. Pyzh’s friends weren’t too worried — “nothing will start,” they said — but she was gripped by an urgent and terrible feeling.

“I’m a really anxious person,” she says, bluntly. “In my world, there is nothing so terrifying like war.”

Mentally, she’d given herself another reason to go. Six years earlier, Pyzh, an architect and artist, had held an exhibition of her works at a gallery in Warsaw, a collection of pieces reflecting on what Ukraine had been left with after the Soviet Union collapsed. One of the largest paintings from that show was still in Poland, and she thought she might take it back.

Monday, Apr. 18, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Michael Rubenfeld shows one of his newest art projects, which highlights the anti-Semitic nature of traditional “lucky Jew” paintings, at the FestivALT office in Krakow.

Refugee Ukrainians far from defeated

Melissa Martin / Photography by Mikaela MacKenzie 25 minute read Preview

Refugee Ukrainians far from defeated

Melissa Martin / Photography by Mikaela MacKenzie 25 minute read Thursday, Apr. 14, 2022

RZESZÓW, Poland — From the outside, the guest house on the edge of Rzeszów looks quiet, tucked on a narrow road that meanders past quaint homes nestled beside sprawling green gardens. A few cars are parked in front, some with Ukrainian licence plates, but the atmosphere here is idyllic and suburban, bordering on rustic.

And in any normal time, Rzeszów — pronounced “Zheshoof” — is a laid-back, albeit growing, sort of place. It’s a city of about 200,000 people, a college town in the southeastern corner of Poland, booming lately with business investments and tourism but still far from the hustle of the capital city of Warsaw. It is comfortable, but not famous. Not in a normal time, anyway.

But this is not a normal time for Rzeszów, because Rzeszów sits just 100 km from the border with Ukraine.

Now, all the donated weapons of the West flow through Rzeszów, and much of its humanitarian aid. The airport north of the city hosts a constant parade of foreign military planes, and when U.S. President Joe Biden visited Poland in March, he came first to Rzeszów, where American troops manage the Patriot missile system freshly installed on the airport’s western flank.

Thursday, Apr. 14, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS The train station in Przemysl on Thursday, April 7, 2022. For Melissa story. Winnipeg Free Press 2022.
MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
The movement of people is non-stop at the train station in Przemysl.

Manitoba-bound mothers fleeing Ukraine with children are terrified, exhausted - but put on a brave face

Melissa Martin, photography by Mikaela MacKenzie 11 minute read Preview

Manitoba-bound mothers fleeing Ukraine with children are terrified, exhausted - but put on a brave face

Melissa Martin, photography by Mikaela MacKenzie 11 minute read Wednesday, Apr. 6, 2022

WARSAW — On the long bus ride out of Ukraine, Nataliia Cherevko’s son, 11-year-old Bohdan, stopped eating. His stomach hurt. Behind them on the bus was another mother, with two sons, and one of them couldn’t eat, either. It was the stress, their mothers thought. It was being a child, and leaving everything they knew behind them.

As the bus rolled west from the heart of the country, Cherevko worried about her son. She worried as the bus came to a stop for a night somewhere near Cherkasy, after hearing that there might be danger ahead. She didn’t know where exactly it was; road signs had been taken down by Ukrainian forces, in an attempt to disorient Russian soldiers.

And she worried as they approached Lviv, where she planned to stay for a few nights so her son could rest and maybe even feel better. But when she asked the bus driver what she should do, he urged her to keep going, straight to the Polish border. There were volunteers there who could help them, he said. He hadn’t been there, but that’s what he’d heard.

Cherevko asked her son if he thought he could manage the journey just a little while longer.

Wednesday, Apr. 6, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Ilona Protynyak, and her children, Demian (five) and Milena (four), walking through the old town in Warsaw. They have been going for long walks to keep the kids occupied while waiting for the Canadian visa paperwork to come through.

Ukrainian refugee on her way to new life in Winnipeg

Melissa Martin, photography by Mikaela MacKenzie 10 minute read Preview

Ukrainian refugee on her way to new life in Winnipeg

Melissa Martin, photography by Mikaela MacKenzie 10 minute read Monday, Apr. 4, 2022

WARSAW — It’s a bitterly cold morning in Poland’s capital, at the heart of the city’s diplomatic row. Outside the concrete-and-glass edifice of the Canadian embassy, about four dozen people are waiting, mostly women with children in tow.

They huddle together under two black tents, hastily erected by security guards for protection from the swirling, wet snow.

As they wait, some greet each other in Ukrainian, others in Russian. New people arrive and ask questions about what to do and where to go.

They’re all in this together in a way, all of them displaced by war and, now, trying to navigate the steps to come to Canada; even after the federal government simplified the process for Ukrainian refugees, it can be slow.

Monday, Apr. 4, 2022

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Ukrainian refugee Tetiana Maksymtsiv first learned about Winnipeg through a friend who had moved to the city about six years ago. In a few days, she will be flying to Winnipeg to settle in Canada.

Gentle as a lamb

Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 1 minute read Preview

Gentle as a lamb

Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 1 minute read Thursday, Mar. 24, 2022

Linda Frig feeds her three-week-old lambs at her family farm near Petersfield on Thursday.

Spring is birthing season on the farm, and so far 35 lambs have been born, with six needing to be bottle fed, which happens when their mothers aren't able to provide for a twin or triplet. Frig feeds them three times a day. 

While they're little, the heated machine shop the lambs call home keeps them cosy until the weather warms up enough for them to go outside. Due to an errant ram in the fall, birthing started early this year on the farm, with the first lambs born in early March when the temperatures were still frigid. The season is now winding down. |

Thursday, Mar. 24, 2022

Lambs on the Frig family farm near Petersfield on March 24, 2022.

Inuit sculptor honours creative mother in massive piece outside WAG’s Qaumajuq

Jen Zoratti / Photography by Mikaela MacKenzie and Jessica Lee 15 minute read Preview

Inuit sculptor honours creative mother in massive piece outside WAG’s Qaumajuq

Jen Zoratti / Photography by Mikaela MacKenzie and Jessica Lee 15 minute read Friday, Dec. 3, 2021

ELIE — Goota Ashoona prefers to work outside.

That’s where she first learned to make her art as a child growing up in an Inuit outpost camp on the shores of Baffin Island, Nunavut, transforming snow into miniature igloos and polar bears under a sky that danced at night.

Today, Ashoona is seated at her outdoor workbench at her home much further south near Elie, her tiny 4-foot-11 frame bundled into a bright-blue hoodie emblazoned with the word “Nunavut” against the red inuksuk and the blue star (the Niqirtsuituq, or North Star) from the territorial flag. She’s surrounded by trees and, beyond them, open prairie.

It’s early afternoon in the small community about 45 kilometres west of Winnipeg, but already, the November sunlight is long and low. Ashoona is carving faces, among her favourite things to carve, into beluga whalebone. It’s silent out here, save for the whine of her rotary tool.

Friday, Dec. 3, 2021

JESSICA LEE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Ashoona in front of her sculpture she made based on a drawing her grandmother created.

Drought, late frost filling ursine orphanage beyond capacity

Eva Wasney / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 16 minute read Preview

Drought, late frost filling ursine orphanage beyond capacity

Eva Wasney / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 16 minute read Friday, Aug. 6, 2021

A few choice morsels of fruit is all it takes to lure Vinny into his new home. Grapes work wonders.

The rough-and-tumble cub was the first orphan brought to Black Bear Rescue Manitoba this spring; he’s since been joined by 26 other young bears who have lost their mother for one reason or another. Space is at a premium and this season has been one long game of musical chairs for rescue operators Judy and Roger Stearns.

“The cubs were arriving so fast and furious,” Judy says. “Sometimes we were scrambling because we were having to shift bears around to make room for everyone.”

Like all new intakes, Vinny’s journey started in the nursery, where cubs feed on formula and bide their time in quarantine, before he was moved into a covered, open-air enclosure in the Bear Building — nicknamed the ‘Bob Barker Building’ after the former Price Is Right host who donated $50,000 to help the Stonewall-area rescue centre get started. Vinny has been living outside full-time since the end of June and recently graduated to a large new pen with 11 of his adoptive siblings.

Friday, Aug. 6, 2021

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Cubs check the branches for berries and eat produce at Black Bear Rescue Manitoba near Stonewall on Wednesday, July 7, 2021. For Eva Wasney story.

Winnipeg Free Press 2021.

For Gimli, relaxed health restrictions a boon to businesses

Ben Waldman / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 6 minute read Preview

For Gimli, relaxed health restrictions a boon to businesses

Ben Waldman / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 6 minute read Monday, Jun. 28, 2021

GIMLI — The patio at Comodo had been quiet for months until Ying Jie Zhen grabbed hold of the hose late Friday afternoon.

With a turn of the spigot, water rushed through the rubber snake and streamed out the other end in a focused mist, as Zhen washed away the dust and leaves that for several months had been the only things sitting outside the Chinese restaurant right at the centre of this Interlake town.

Nobody ever looked happier doing dirty work.

There was a reason for the man’s joy: the next day, people could finally sit on the freshly washed green furniture and eat, the result of an updated and relaxed set of public health measures, issued by the province as COVID-19 infection rates decreased somewhat and as vaccination rates grew steadily. The size of permitted outdoor gatherings was set to grow to a maximum of 25 people.

Monday, Jun. 28, 2021

The lunchtime rush at Kris’ Fish & Chips is a welcome sight.

Couple 'cub scout leaders' for orphan bears

Eva Wasney / Mikaela MacKenzie photography 14 minute read Preview

Couple 'cub scout leaders' for orphan bears

Eva Wasney / Mikaela MacKenzie photography 14 minute read Friday, May. 21, 2021

Supper is finished, the cats, dogs and horses are fed and Judy and Roger Stearns are about to settle in for a rare evening of Netflix when the phone rings. It’s a call they had been expecting, they just didn’t know when it would come.

“We’ve got a cub for you,” says the voice on the other end of the line.

The television is promptly switched off and the next 12 hours turn into a blur of preparation.

The Stearns have been running Black Bear Rescue Manitoba on their property near Stonewall since 2018. Over that time, the husband-and-wife duo have raised and released 27 orphaned cubs back into the Manitoba wild. It’s an operation filled with equal parts purpose and exhaustion.

Friday, May. 21, 2021

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Judy Stearns gives the cub its first feeding at the black bear rehabilitation centre near Stonewall on Sunday, April 25, 2021. For Eva Wasney story.

Winnipeg Free Press 2020.

Vinny arrives at Black Bear Rescue Manitoba

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIKAELA MACKENZIE 0 minute read Preview

Vinny arrives at Black Bear Rescue Manitoba

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIKAELA MACKENZIE 0 minute read Friday, May. 21, 2021

Friday, May. 21, 2021

Judy Stearns calls the vet while waiting for Manitoba Conservation. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

Rebuild it and they will come

Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 1 minute read Preview

Rebuild it and they will come

Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 1 minute read Saturday, Feb. 13, 2021

The Royal Aviation Museum of Western Canada will open its new $45-million, 86,000 square-foot facility in early 2022.

While construction of the football field-sized building, located on the terminal loop at the Winnipeg James Armstrong International Airport, is more than 50 per cent complete, volunteers are busy behind the scenes preparing exhibits.

That exhibition development work is taking place at a warehouse that enables the museum to house eight aircraft and hundreds of artifacts for restoration and research.

The museum, which was founded in 1974, will house a world-case collection of bush planes and modern aircraft, including four models that can't be seen anywhere else in the world.

Saturday, Feb. 13, 2021

The first helicopter to fly in Canada at the warehouse where exhibits are being conserved, restored, and prepared for the Western Canadian Aviation Museum slated to open at the old airport in 2022.

HSC pushed to limit in struggle to keep COVID patients alive

Kevin Rollason / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 4 minute read Preview

HSC pushed to limit in struggle to keep COVID patients alive

Kevin Rollason / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 4 minute read Thursday, Dec. 17, 2020

Multiple patients being resuscitated. More patients than normal being moved to palliative care. Nurses who had rarely witnessed patients die, now see death regularly. Thousands of elective surgeries at a standstill.

The scenarios are part of daily life at Health Sciences Centre, as the second wave of COVID-19 crashes through the corridors of the province’s largest hospital like a weeks-long tsunami that shows no sign of receding.

The Free Press was given the chance recently to get an inside look at the day-to-day reality in the hospital as it treats dozens of patients stricken with COVID-19 in the emergency department, intensive care unit, and other areas of the facility.

Because of COVID restrictions, Shared Health accommodated one videographer and one photographer, to share the information with multiple media outlets. The aim was to capture interviews with staff members, including heads of ICU and surgery, as well as a nurse and microbiologist.

Thursday, Dec. 17, 2020

A COVID-19-positive intensive care unit

Local luthier Garth Lee crafts world-class violins, violas and cellos

Holly Harris / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press 6 minute read Preview

Local luthier Garth Lee crafts world-class violins, violas and cellos

Holly Harris / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press 6 minute read Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020

Ever since fiddles first found their footing in Italy in the mid-1500s, generations of music lovers have thrilled to the sound of soaring strings, with gleaming instruments, some more than 300 years old, breathing life into classical masterworks as distinguished elders of the orchestra.

However, many of their string descendants, including those made by Winnipeg violin maker Garth Lee, prove that music can be just as sweet on a modern-day instrument with its varnish still curing. The local luthier’s meticulously handcrafted violins, violas and cellos, created in his own Garth Lee Strings studio, have garnered praise from around the globe for their artistry.

“It’s something that I thought would be an amazing thing to do, as I’ve always been involved in woodworking and music,” Lee says of his collection of 37 “Garth Lees” completed since 2008. “Making something that has to function as a musical instrument, as well as be esthetically beautiful, is the ultimate woodworking project.

Born in Fort Vermilion, Alta., Lee arrived in Manitoba in 1998 as a teenager, settling with his family in the small farming community of Pierson in the southwest corner of the province. He relocated to Winnipeg several years later to earn his commercial pilot’s licence through St. Andrews Airport, but he quickly realized his true calling lay not in soaring above the clouds but whittling wood to make musical works of art.

Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020

Garth Lee is one of only about 25 luthiers — woodworkers who make violins, violas and cellos — in Canada.

Winnipegger's hybrid burger targets flexitarian consumers

David Sanderson / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 8 minute read Preview

Winnipegger's hybrid burger targets flexitarian consumers

David Sanderson / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 8 minute read Saturday, Aug. 29, 2020

James Battershill isn’t insulted when somebody tells him they can’t taste the difference between a burger made with Bump, the beef hybrid his parent company, Juno Food Labs, introduced to Winnipeg store shelves in March, versus one readied with good, ol’ ground round.

“No, that doesn’t bug me at all, because at the end of the day that’s the entire point,” he says nursing a cup of coffee in True North Square’s Hargrave St. Market. “Whenever I hear someone say their meatloaf or lasagna (prepared with Bump) tastes the same as it always did, I definitely take that as a compliment.”

Dressed in grey pants, white sneakers and a black T-shirt emblazoned with Bump’s official logo, Battershill, 35, says Bump, containing 70 per cent Western Canadian beef mixed with 30 per cent plant-based protein, is aimed primarily at flexitarians, people who are largely vegetarian but still enjoy chowing down on a steak every now and again, or wouldn’t dream of saying no to their grandmother’s turkey dinner.

“For health and environmental reasons, lots of people are taking steps towards reducing the amount of meat in their diet,” he says. “At the same time, many of them have a slew of time-tested recipes they know and love. So instead of having to adapt those recipes or ditch them altogether, they can use our product, while at the same time eating 30 per cent less meat.”

Saturday, Aug. 29, 2020

James Battershill hopes to capitalize on a shift in consumer demand to more plant-based protein.

Former CFL, NFL defensive end Jason Vega tackling life in Winnipeg

David Sanderson / Mikaela MacKenzie photographay 12 minute read Preview

Former CFL, NFL defensive end Jason Vega tackling life in Winnipeg

David Sanderson / Mikaela MacKenzie photographay 12 minute read Friday, Aug. 21, 2020

For five Canadian Football League seasons — three as a valued member of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers — Jason Vega got used to being recognized when he was out and about as a tenacious defender who wouldn’t take no for an answer in his pursuit of an opposing team’s quarterback or ball carrier.

Lately, however, the 33-year-old married father of three, who retired from the gridiron in 2017, has grown more accustomed to standing in line at Costco or the gas station and answering queries along the lines of, “Hey, aren’t you the guy in those funny car commercials on TV?” At which point Vega, the new car sales manager at Winnipeg Dodge, 3965 Portage Ave., will flash his inquisitor an ear-to-ear grin while responding, “Ha... guilty as charged.”

“Or they’ll repeat a few of my catchphrases back at me, saying something like they know they can’t hug me now but they’ll catch me later,” he says, referring to a spot that began airing at the end of April during which he squeezes the life out of an oversized teddy bear instead of members of his sales team in order to promote social-distancing protocols owing to COVID-19. (Our favourite? The dealership’s latest blurb wherein Vega drops cliché after cliché, quoting lines from sports flicks such as Any Given Sunday and The Mighty Ducks, all the while promoting Jeep Compasses and Dodge Grand Caravans.)

OK, here’s the million-dollar question: as natural as he comes across onscreen — the ex-lineman credits the hours he spent patiently answering reporters’ questions during his professional football career for his comfort level in front of a camera — what’s tougher: taking on a 300-pound offensive guard or trying to peddle a $75,000 Ram 1500 Sport pickup truck?

Friday, Aug. 21, 2020

Jason Vega, with children Jazi, 8, Adrian, 3, and Evan, 11 months, and wife, Brittany, has become a true-blue Winnipegger.

Well-seasoned barbecue man determined to succeed 

David Sanderson / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 7 minute read Preview

Well-seasoned barbecue man determined to succeed 

David Sanderson / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 7 minute read Saturday, May. 9, 2020

How’s this for a double-whammy?

Last October, Fraser Mason opened Sandy-Lou’s Barbecue, a no-frills eatery specializing in burgers, dogs and ribs, on the ground level of a historic, downtown hotel. Three-and-a-half months later, days after the building’s owner allegedly threatened to raise the rent by 35 per cent, Mason gathered his pots and pans and walked out the door. (Because the case is currently before the courts — both sides are suing one another for breach of contract — we’re not naming the locale-in-question.)

On March 1, Mason reopened his restaurant, this time dubbing it Sandy-Lou’s Diner, inside an equally iconic setting — the LaSalle Hotel at 346 Nairn Ave., a 106-year-old, three-story inn situated a stone’s throw away from the Louise Bridge. Of course, everybody knows what happened next. Beginning in mid-March, dine-in restaurants across the continent, Sandy-Lou’s included, were forced to close their doors, owing to COVID-19.

Given how things have gone during his first seven months on the job, we wondered if Mason, whose locale has remained open for pickup or delivery through Uber Eats, Skip the Dishes and Door Dash, feels completely snakebit? Not a whit, he replies.

Saturday, May. 9, 2020

Fraser Mason figures he’s the only joint in Winnipeg offering Cincinnati chili, a plate of spaghetti and spicy meat sauce with onions and beans and piled high with cheddar.

Artists capture moody Manitoba moments

Mikaela Mackenzie 3 minute read Preview

Artists capture moody Manitoba moments

Mikaela Mackenzie 3 minute read Thursday, Apr. 9, 2020

We’re all spending more time inside our homes, with the view of the outside world framed by our windows.

“Maybe you’d like to join me in drawing the view from your window instead of just staring out existentially,” local artist Natalie Baird posted on her Instagram page in mid-March.

Social media hashtags such as #seeyoufrommywindow and #uskathome, as well as prompts from galleries and online art clubs, are encouraging artists to take inspiration from these new limitations. Here are a few local creatives who drew the view from their side of the glass.

 

Thursday, Apr. 9, 2020

Boeing Classic takes off: Amateur athletes giving it their all

Photography by Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press 1 minute read Preview

Boeing Classic takes off: Amateur athletes giving it their all

Photography by Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press 1 minute read Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020

Approximately 1,500 athletes from Manitoba and neighbouring provinces are in Winnipeg for the 39th annual Boeing Classic Indoor Track & Field Championships being held at the Jim Daly Fieldhouse at the University of Manitoba’s Fort Garry campus. |

Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Victoria Culbert, 13, competes in hurdles at the 39th Annual Boeing Classic Indoor Track & Field Championships at the Max Bell Centre in Winnipeg on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020. Standup.

Winnipeg Free Press 2019.

One family passes trapping knowledge through three generations

Story and photography by Mikaela Mackenzie / Winnipeg Free Press 5 minute read Preview

One family passes trapping knowledge through three generations

Story and photography by Mikaela Mackenzie / Winnipeg Free Press 5 minute read Friday, Feb. 28, 2020

Snow falls softly over a muted landscape of boreal forest, rock ridges, spruce swamps and beaver ponds. This 60-square-kilometre area of land in the southwest corner of Whiteshell Provincial Park is the Imrie family trapline; they are designated to trap and manage the populations of fur-bearing animals.

Right now, three generations of Imries — Murray, 72, Devin, 36, and five-year-old Thomas — are gathered at a beaver house. Devin thumps a 1.5-metre-long ice chisel onto the surface of the pond, looking for the entrance of the lodge (the movement of the beavers swimming back and forth below weakens the surface). Thomas climbs onto the pile of sticks and brush with his grandpa, and the two dig through the snow to find the breathing hole. Hot air and a thick, musky smell means that the beavers are active here this winter.

The scene could have taken place a century earlier. Other than the snowmobiles parked nearby, the process hasn’t changed much over the years. Devin cuts a hole in the ice, chops down a long, thin tree to serve as a pole for holding the traps under the water, and then gets to work setting them. They are wire “conibear” style traps, orange with rust after many seasons of use, designed to snap around the animals’ neck or body, killing them instantly.

Murray explains the beavers have already eaten all of the poplar in the area, which is their preferred food source, and have moved onto birch and spruce. If the going gets really rough, the rodents might even resort to eating cattail tubers to make it through the winter. A twig of poplar, scratched to simulate tooth marks, is stuck into the trap as bait. “We’re going to have a beaver probably in less than two days,” crows Thomas.

Friday, Feb. 28, 2020

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Devin Imrie sets a new beaver trap with help from his dad, Murray, on their trapline near Falcon Lake while Devin’s son, Thomas, 5, looks on.

Fans take to fast-paced, affordable junior-hockey fun

Mike Sawatzky / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 21 minute read Preview

Fans take to fast-paced, affordable junior-hockey fun

Mike Sawatzky / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie 21 minute read Friday, Feb. 21, 2020

It’s a hockey palace, this place.

Less than a year after its official opening, the Rink Training Centre, nestled on a large parcel of frozen prairie between Oak Bluff and what was once the southwestern edge of Winnipeg, still has a new-car smell.

The offices gleam.

Despite opening last June, the NHL-sized arena surface and the facility’s smaller areas for goalie and player training look brand-new. The players’ study room, coaches’ areas and workout facilities are ultra-modern and immaculate.

Friday, Feb. 21, 2020

Darris Hardern, team athletic therapist, preps water bottles and towels for the Winnipeg Ice practice on Feb. 8.

Timeless elegance

Todd Lewys  / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press 4 minute read Preview

Timeless elegance

Todd Lewys  / Photos by Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press 4 minute read Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020

Brett Castelane of Century 21 Bachman & Associates says 68 Ash St. is a glorious home both inside and out.

“This truly is a grand home,” he says of the 3,708 sq. ft., two-storey. “It’s in a spectacular location just off Wellington Crescent on a mature, 120-foot-deep lot. Outside, it features a classic Tudor design, while its interior features English Jacobean and Spanish styling. It’s difficult to find a home like this — it’s just so well-preserved and full of character and style.”

That character and style is front and centre the moment you set foot in the 91-year-old home’s sunken, tiled foyer. There’s wood everywhere, the original oak front door, the oak-trimmed stained glass window to its right, pristine oak hardwoods that run from the front landing through most of the main level and a grand, hand-crafted oak staircase tucked away to the left of the foyer.

From there the home unfolds in natural, spectacular fashion. Textured off-white plaster walls mesh beautifully with all the wonderful wood. On cue, a wide doorway to the right of the landing leads into a sitting room with a high ceiling, oak-trimmed window and a streamlined fireplace.

Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020

68 Ash St. in River Heights features a classic Tudor style.