Mike Deal

Mike Deal

Photojournalist

Mike Deal started freelancing for the Winnipeg Free Press in 1997. Three years later, he landed a part-time job as a night photo desk editor.

His first day in the new position was supposed to be Sept. 12, 2001, but when he awoke to the news of the World Trade Center attacks in New York on Sept. 11, he automatically headed into the newsroom and started work.

For the next few years, he split his hours at the Free Press between photo editing and  photography. In 2008, Mike was hired as a full-time photojournalist.

Mike’s training includes a journalism diploma from the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology. He also spent time at the University of Manitoba working at the Manitoban, the U of M photo club and taking fine art courses.

He recently finished a personal challenge he set for himself: to shoot 2,013 portraits in 2013 with his iPhone. Now, he’s looking forward to raising the portrait project to another level. Don’t be surprised if he stops you in the street and asks for a moment of your time. You have been warned.

Another personal passion is street photography, capturing the people of Winnipeg amongst the beautiful architecture of the city’s downtown.

In his off hours Mike enjoys taking photos with his iPhone, walks in Assiniboine Forest and spending as as much time as possible with his partner Ariel and their daughter Anna.

Recent articles of Mike Deal

In full bloom

Photography by Mike Deal 1 minute read Preview

In full bloom

Photography by Mike Deal 1 minute read Friday, Aug. 26, 2022

The Gardens at the Leaf opened to the public this summer, offering visitors an eye-popping palette of colourful plants and flowers.

The nearly 30-acre site in the southeast corner of Assiniboine Park features six areas — Indigenous Peoples Garden, Kitchen Garden, Sensory Garden, Performance Garden, Seasonal Garden and The Grove. |

Friday, Aug. 26, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

A bumble bee explores among Allium millennium.

Eggs-ploring their heritage

David Sanderson / Photos by Mike Deal 6 minute read Preview

Eggs-ploring their heritage

David Sanderson / Photos by Mike Deal 6 minute read Thursday, Apr. 14, 2022

Pysanky for Ukraine Day, an annual event that fell on April 1, invited people from all walks of life to create pysanky — colourfully painted eggs adorned with traditional Ukrainian symbols and patterns — to show their support for the Eastern European nation.

Tracy Rossier, a Headingley-based artist who operates an Etsy shop dubbed Pysanky by Tracy, took part again this year, and noticed a higher number of registrants than usual posting photos or TikTok videos of their finished products, owing, no doubt, to the ongoing conflict in Ukraine.

Not only that, more people in general seem to be exploring their Ukrainian heritage because of the Russian invasion, she says, seated in a Portage Avenue coffee shop, where other customers peek over to admire an assortment of eggs dyed pink, yellow, orange and blue that she brought along for show-and-tell purposes.

“The weeks leading up to Easter have always been a busy time for me but lately it’s been especially go, go, go,” she continues, politely correcting our pronunciation — “It’s pih-sahn-kah” — when we utter “pie-san-kee” in error.

Thursday, Apr. 14, 2022

Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press

After 21 months in the dark, the curtain rises again at the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre

Alan Small, photography by Mike Deal 18 minute read Preview

After 21 months in the dark, the curtain rises again at the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre

Alan Small, photography by Mike Deal 18 minute read Friday, Nov. 26, 2021

It’s been hard times for John Hirsch and Tom Hendry.

The founders of the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre — or at least their bronze likenesses that stand at the entrance to the theatre at Market Avenue and Lily Street — have welcomed theatre-goers while withstanding blazing sunshine and blinding snowstorms with their gazes of wonder and fascination intact.

The statue seat beside them, and the 785 others inside the John Hirsch Mainstage, have been unoccupied for the past 21 months. The only visitors they greeted were pranksters who placed medical masks over their noses and mouths, an amusing blip of comedy during the tragedy of the COVID-19 pandemic.

But they had plenty of company Thursday night when the theatre’s marquee lit up once again and ticketholders returned to Winnipeg’s largest theatre company for the opening of Orlando, RMTC’s first new play since March 2020.

Friday, Nov. 26, 2021

Em Siobhan McCourt (right), who will be portraying Orlando, during rehearsal with the chorus (from left) Simon Bracken, Simon Miron, Breton Lalama, and Ivy Charles.

Diamond Jubilee portrait of Queen moves into the Manitoba legislature

Mike Deal photography 2 minute read Preview

Diamond Jubilee portrait of Queen moves into the Manitoba legislature

Mike Deal photography 2 minute read Monday, May. 3, 2021

On Monday, a crew from Total Co-ordination and Construction unloaded and installed the Diamond Jubilee portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, which is on a cross-country tour while Rideau Hall in Ottawa, where it is normally on display, undergoes construction.

The painting will be in the Manitoba legislative building room 200 for a year, until May 2022.

The portrait, which is part of the NCC’s Crown Collection, was painted on the occasion of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee by Phil Richards. It was officially unveiled in London, U.K., in 2012, in the presence of The Queen, the Right Honourable David Johnston, then-Governor General of Canada, and the Right Honourable Stephen Harper, then-Prime Minister of Canada.

The painting was installed at Rideau Hall on June 28, 2012. That same year, it was the subject of a documentary produced by the National Film Board of Canada to show the various steps involved in creating the portrait and interviews with the artist.

Monday, May. 3, 2021

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESSA crew from Total Co-ordination and Construction unloads and installs the Diamond Jubilee Portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II which is on a cross country tour while Rideau Hall in Ottawa where it is normally on display undergoes construction. The painting will be in the Manitoba Legislative building room 200 for a year, until May 2022.The portrait, which is part of the NCC’s Crown Collection, was painted on the occasion of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee by Phil Richards. It was officially unveiled in London, U.K., in 2012, in the presence of The Queen, the Right Honourable David Johnston, then-Governor General of Canada, and the Right Honourable Stephen Harper, then-Prime Minister of Canada. The painting was installed at Rideau Hall on June 28, 2012. That same year, it was the subject of a documentary produced by the National Film Board of Canada to show the various steps involved in creating the portrait and interviews with the artist. In late 2018, The Office of the Secretary to the Governor General of Canada (OSGG) announced that the Diamond Jubilee Portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, which has been on display in the Ballroom at Rideau Hall since 2012, would be undertaking a cross-country tour.Since leaving Rideau Hall in September 2018, the portrait has been on display in St. John’s, N.L., as well as Fredericton, N.B. It will remain on display at the Manitoba Legislative Building until May 2022. Her Majesty will also celebrate Her Platinum Jubilee in 2022, marking 70 years since her accession to the throne.The portrait will not be on public display until COVID restrictions are lifted, allowing for tours of the building to resume.210503 - Monday, May 03, 2021.

For these collectors, it's fine to judge a book by its cover

David Sanderson / Photos by Mike Deal 8 minute read Preview

For these collectors, it's fine to judge a book by its cover

David Sanderson / Photos by Mike Deal 8 minute read Friday, Nov. 13, 2020

When you’ve been writing about collectors and their various treasures for 17-odd years, your inbox can get rather… interesting at times.

Case in point: a few weeks back we received an email from a Free Press subscriber whose wife was torn over what to do with a mishmash of nostalgic objects she’d kept stored in the garage for years, mostly because she didn’t have the heart to toss them out with the trash.

The missive read, in part: “Hi David. I seem to recall you doing a story on someone who collects old matchbooks and it turns out (spouse’s name removed) has a few hundred she would like to give away. Do you know someone who would like these?”

First of all, our contact has a long memory. Yes, we did put together a story about a phillumenist, or matchbook collector, in July 2007, a person whose sole focus was matchbook covers boasting logos of Winnipeg bars and restaurants from yesteryear.

Friday, Nov. 13, 2020

Some of Denis Bouchard's matchbook collection. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)

Smokehouse blues

David Sanderson / Mike Deal photography 8 minute read Preview

Smokehouse blues

David Sanderson / Mike Deal photography 8 minute read Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020

Following a 2013 fire that charred or destroyed an exhaustive collection of records, musical instruments and assorted rock ‘n’ roll keepsakes, friends and family reached out to Alan Ollinger, telling him they were sorry for his loss.

Even a neighbour who was in the hospital battling cancer expressed sympathy that items Ollinger spent years amassing had literally gone up in smoke. That’s OK, he told everybody, always adding that at the end of the day it was “just stuff.” A few months later, however, once the initial shock had subsided somewhat, the married father of three admits to, in his words, snapping.

“One morning I woke up and yelled out, ‘Yeah, it was just stuff. But it was my stuff! And it was pretty cool stuff!’”

This is the story of Ollinger’s “stuff,” and to borrow a line from Don McLean’s American Pie, the day the music died.

Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020

Alan Ollinger plays the bass guitar he bought from Streetheart co-founder Spider in his backyard man-cave, a 600-square-foot building that contains scores of musical memorabilia he’s collected thru the years.

Hearts and Roots harvest

Mike Deal Photography/ Winnipeg Free Press 1 minute read Preview

Hearts and Roots harvest

Mike Deal Photography/ Winnipeg Free Press 1 minute read Friday, Oct. 16, 2020

The 2020 growing and selling season at Hearts and Roots, a small farm south of Elie owned by Britt Embry and Justin Girard, is on its last legs. The small-scale farm provides certified organic fruit and vegetables to customers. |

Friday, Oct. 16, 2020

"For myself, a more gradual transition is helpful," Embry says. "I’ve noticed in the past when suddenly the farm’s over (and) your purpose is over it’s a hard transition."

Manitoba farming couples ponder their futures

Eva Wasney / Mike Deal photography 24 minute read Preview

Manitoba farming couples ponder their futures

Eva Wasney / Mike Deal photography 24 minute read Friday, Oct. 16, 2020

Fields that were lush and green have been reduced to brown stubble and black dirt. Fall is the end of the year for many Manitoba farmers and a season defined by hard work and high yields.

It is also a stark reminder of the demands a bountiful harvest makes of people and land, year after year.

This is the final chapter of our three-part series on modern agriculture in Manitoba. The Free Press followed three sets of young farmers through the growing season to shed light on how food is being produced in 2020 and how the next generation is changing the game and carrying on the tradition.

This instalment focuses on the season that was and the uncertain future that is going to be.

Friday, Oct. 16, 2020

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Cows gather for a drink from a water well on one of the pastures.

All in a day's work, Kristine and Graham Tapley replace a fence and move a herd of cattle to fresh grazing as well as keep up to date on the chemical analysis of their feed.

See Eva Wasney feature

200929 - Tuesday, September 29, 2020.

Young producers follow in generational footsteps, but determined to set their own path

Eva Wasney | Photography by Mike Deal 27 minute read Preview

Young producers follow in generational footsteps, but determined to set their own path

Eva Wasney | Photography by Mike Deal 27 minute read Friday, Aug. 14, 2020

Farming is a family business for many Manitoban producers. Opportunities to farm are usually inherited, methods are passed down (and inevitably tweaked) and multiple generations are often found working and living together on a shared slice of land.This summer, the Winnipeg Free Press is exploring farm family dynamics and the challenge of carving out time in an occupation where the workday never really ends.

This is the second instalment of our serialized look at the realities of work and life on a modern farm in Manitoba.

Reporter Eva Wasney and photojournalist Mike Deal hit the road for a summer farm tour to catch up with ranchers Kristine and Graham Tapley of Old Shore Cattle Co. near Langruth; mixed grain farmer Colin Penner of Pennmann Farms Ltd. by Elm Creek; and organic vegetable growers Britt Embry and Justin Girard of Hearts and Roots south of Elie.

• • •

Friday, Aug. 14, 2020

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Graham Tapley, joined in the tractor cab with his son Walker, 2, cuts hay for the cattle.

Free Press photojournalist brushes away pandemic-fuelled anxiety, creates art in the process

Mike Deal 3 minute read Preview

Free Press photojournalist brushes away pandemic-fuelled anxiety, creates art in the process

Mike Deal 3 minute read Friday, Aug. 7, 2020

I hadn’t planned it this way, but when a global pandemic hits, planning goes out the window.

The arrival of COVID-19 in Manitoba and the subsequent safety-based restrictions posed a significant professional challenge for me and the other photojournalists at the Free Press.

The early days involved finding creative ways to document one of the most important stories in the province’s history. Wearing masks, washing my hands so often that my typically dry skin was left raw, was the new reality as I looked for unique perspectives to explore with my camera.

As weeks passed, I wanted to see if there was another way to document the pandemic in the city. A newfound passion for watercolour painting gave me that opportunity.

Friday, Aug. 7, 2020

Thirty selfies led to thirty watercolour portraits for photojournalist Mike Deal.

Snowbirds flyover draws eyes to the sky across city

Ben Waldman, Photography by Mike Deal and Ruth Bonneville 3 minute read Preview

Snowbirds flyover draws eyes to the sky across city

Ben Waldman, Photography by Mike Deal and Ruth Bonneville 3 minute read Tuesday, May. 12, 2020

Five geese fluttered above the parking lot at Grace Hospital Tuesday morning, honking and honking, with dozens of people — nurses, doctors, patients, maintenance workers, random people off the street — standing in small clusters, craning their necks toward the sky.

The geese made routine landings and joined the crowd looking into the sky to watch birds much bigger than them that had not feathers, but jet engines.

The Canadian Forces Snowbirds were coming to say hello.

It was 9:30 a.m., and Elsie Cesmistruk, a health-care aide who started work about two hours earlier, exited through the Grace's front doors to get some fresh air. She was wearing a blue mask, dark scrubs and comfy-looking runners. Her morning break just happened to coincide with the impending fly-by of nine jets zipping at nearly 600 kilometres per hour through the Prairie sky.

Tuesday, May. 12, 2020

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

The Snowbirds fly over the city’s hospitals Tuesday morning while on a cross-country tour to boost morale during the COVID-19 pandemic.

200512 - Tuesday, May 12, 2020.

Gusto North offers up ambitious dishes, rustic homemade flavours

Alison Gillmor / Photos by Mike Deal 4 minute read Preview

Gusto North offers up ambitious dishes, rustic homemade flavours

Alison Gillmor / Photos by Mike Deal 4 minute read Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020

The only self-enclosed restaurant with sit-down service within the recently opened Hargrave St. Market, Gusto North is an outpost of the popular Pizzeria Gusto in River Heights.

As befits the anchor of this very sleek new food hall, this is a handsome space with a buzzy, big-city ambience, especially at night, when the lights are low and the noise level is high. Come summertime, there’s a patio with cool downtown views.

The modern Italian menu, sharing some of the same inspirations as the Academy Road location, is ambitious, but there are a few highs and lows in execution.

Gusto North wants to bring diners the best of the Italian family table, so it’s not surprising that some of the best dishes are the simplest.

Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020

Ricotta Della Piazza San Mariano features tomato jam, chili oil, pumpkin seeds, basil and grilled sour dough.

WAG's Inuit Art Centre architect inspired by North's endless space, distant horizons

Melissa Martin / Photography by Mike Deal 8 minute read Preview

WAG's Inuit Art Centre architect inspired by North's endless space, distant horizons

Melissa Martin / Photography by Mike Deal 8 minute read Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019

At the edge of the observation deck, Michael Maltzan pauses, his bright yellow safety vest glaring bright amid the lines of soaring steel bars and flat concrete floors. He looks down over the gallery below, or what will soon become the gallery, for now exhibiting only a tangle of cables and crates waiting to be opened.

It is Saturday afternoon at the site of the Winnipeg Art Gallery's new Inuit Art Centre, the gleaming new facility rising at the corner of Memorial Boulevard and St. Mary Avenue. The construction that buzzes most days is quiet for the time being, so as to allow three tours of the site for a small group of WAG donors and journalists.

The tour rose from the entry atrium, dominated by the serpentine steel frame of the three-storey visible vault, where the gallery's archived collection of Inuit art will be visible to all who enter. It's a rare feature for an art gallery: usually, works not on display are locked away in the back of house.

But here, Maltzan explains, all of these things will be in conversation. The artwork, the curation, the second-floor learning centre and the vast main exhibition hall: all of it is intended to flow together, inviting visitors to stream into and through and around it.

Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019

(Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)

Brewing up camp fun

Mike Deal photos 2 minute read Preview

Brewing up camp fun

Mike Deal photos 2 minute read Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019

It’s a rite of passage for hundreds of kids each summer — getting out of the city to spend a week at camp.

Earlier this week, Free Press photographer Mike Deal headed to Tim Horton Camp Whiteshell to capture that tradition.

The camp, on Sylvia Lake in Whiteshell Provincial Park, is the newest Tim Hortons Foundation Camp. There are six across Canada and one in Kentucky.

The camp opened in June 2015 and serves more than 2,500 campers between March and October. It employs approximately 10 full-time and 90 seasonal staff, which includes counsellors, nurses, social workers, food service workers and property managers.

Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019

Campers load up the bus prior to heading out on their six-day backcountry canoe trip at Camp Whiteshell.

‘Rock-solid’ reincarnation

Solomon Israel, Photography by Mike Deal 4 minute read Preview

‘Rock-solid’ reincarnation

Solomon Israel, Photography by Mike Deal 4 minute read Monday, Aug. 12, 2019

The Gregg Building, a 117-year-old Exchange District warehouse that has sat empty for years, will be reborn sometime in the 2020s as a mixed commercial-residential space.

“The building itself is rock-solid, and I think there’s potential there,” said Jay Knysh, owner of Winnipeg’s Knysh Construction, who bought the designated heritage building at 52 Albert St. earlier this year.

Land title records show the property changed hands for $885,000. The four-storey Romanesque-revival warehouse was designed by architect James H. Cadham for silk importer G.R. Gregg and Company. The brick structure was built in 1902, with a fifth storey added in 1922.

Knysh estimates the redevelopment project will take three years. Workers are currently cleaning up the building’s interior, reclaiming as much original material as they can.

Monday, Aug. 12, 2019

The new owner of the Gregg Building has the full support of Heritage Winnipeg. Jay Knysh ‘is exactly who we want to own the building,‘ said executive director Cindy Tugwell.

Bright yellow house turns heads

Ashley Prest / Photography by Mike Deal 4 minute read Preview

Bright yellow house turns heads

Ashley Prest / Photography by Mike Deal 4 minute read Sunday, Jun. 23, 2019

Marina Harvard’s house is so bright, she’s gotta wear shades.

Harvard and her three children were relaxing at the neighbourhood splash pad last Wednesday while the outside of their Fort Rouge house was being painted when she received a text from her husband.

“It’s REALLY yellow.”

She and the kids rolled up to a house so yellow, it was shimmering in the sunlight. The house was already drawing a crowd.

Sunday, Jun. 23, 2019

Quinn Harvard gives an emphatic thumbs down to the colour of his parents’ Fort Rouge home.

This year's selection marking National Poetry Month explores 'nature'

Curated by John Toews and Ariel Gordon, Photography by Mike Deal 9 minute read Preview

This year's selection marking National Poetry Month explores 'nature'

Curated by John Toews and Ariel Gordon, Photography by Mike Deal 9 minute read Saturday, Apr. 20, 2019

April is National Poetry Month and, for the fourth year in a row, the Winnipeg Free Press invited Winnipeg poets, new and established, to contribute their voices to the celebration. This year, the supplement follows the League of Canadian Poets’ recommended theme of “Nature”.

One of the most exciting things about reading poetry is its ability to plant a single word or image that blooms in the reader’s mind. We all pass through the same territory each day — beneath the same trees, across the same fields, down the same streets — but seeing that journey through another’s eyes, exploring alongside a new guide, can open your mind to the seemingly endless possibilities and vistas the world around us has to offer.

Take this paper out to your porch or your front stoop. Fold it beneath your arm and find a park bench where you can sit and breathe in the air while looking out at the greenery of a park or across the Red River. If you’re feeling particularly coordinated, take the paper for a walk with you and match the tempo of your footsteps to the rhythm of the text.

Either way, we hope that these poems will help you see the world just a little bit differently and help you hear the song carried on every gust of wind. We’ll see you next year!

Saturday, Apr. 20, 2019

Kaelen Bell

From Riel to Riel: Métis leader, Manitoba founder's footprint visible throughout city

Mike Deal 1 minute read Preview

From Riel to Riel: Métis leader, Manitoba founder's footprint visible throughout city

Mike Deal 1 minute read Friday, Feb. 15, 2019

The camera used is a Mamiya Press Super 23 Rangefinder, with a Sekor 100 mm f/3.5 lens. It takes 120 roll film that allows the photographer to get 6 cm x 9 cm images. |

Friday, Feb. 15, 2019

The Louis Riel statue on the grounds of the legislature was installed in 1996 on May 12, which is Manitoba Day, by the Manitoba Métis Federation.

Winter getaway: Inside the Buller Greenhouse

Photography by Mike Deal 1 minute read Preview

Winter getaway: Inside the Buller Greenhouse

Photography by Mike Deal 1 minute read Friday, Jan. 25, 2019

Up until 2014, the Buller Greenhouse at the University of Manitoba was only open to instructors and researchers in the biological sciences department.

That year, Carla Zelmer, the new greenhouse manager, decided the facility should be enjoyed by the wider U of M community.

The greenhouse is now open to the public Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. until noon. |

Friday, Jan. 25, 2019

Students walk past the windows of the Buller Greenhouse.

Construction of the Inuit Art Centre

Mike Deal 1 minute read Preview

Construction of the Inuit Art Centre

Mike Deal 1 minute read Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019

On Wednesday, Free Press photographer Mike Deal captured the construction progress to date on the Winnipeg Art Gallery’s ambitious Inuit Art Centre.

Construction on the complex, located directly south of the existing art gallery, began last May with PCL serving as its construction manager.  When completed, the $65-million complex will house the largest public collection of contemporary Inuit art in the world.

The four-storey, 40,000-square-foot centre, which was designed by Michael Maltzan Architecture to evoke the northern landscape, will connect to the main gallery by bridges on all levels. It will feature exhibition spaces, a glass enclosed visible art vault, a conservation facility, art studios and interactive theatre.

The centre is scheduled to be completed in 2020, in time for the province’s 150th birthday.

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
A view of the construction of the Inuit Art Centre from the roof of the Winnipeg Art Gallery Wednesday afternoon.

Thousands of kids pack Bell MTS Place for We Day 2018

Mike Deal 1 minute read Preview

Thousands of kids pack Bell MTS Place for We Day 2018

Mike Deal 1 minute read Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018

Around 16,000 students from across Manitoba were celebrated their commitment to making a difference at We Day at the Bell MTS Place on Tuesday. Tuesday's lineup of speakers and performers includes basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Boston Marathon bombing survivor Adrianne Haslet, 15-year-old Toronto pop singer Johnny Orlando, and American dancer, singer, model and actress Kenzie Ziegler, along with We Charity co-founders Craig and Marc Kielburger. |

Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Around 16,000 kids from across Manitoba attend WE Day at Bell MTS Place where they were celebrating young people committed to making a difference.

181030 - Tuesday, October 30, 2018

New Toonie unveiled at Canadian Mint

Mike Deal 1 minute read Preview

New Toonie unveiled at Canadian Mint

Mike Deal 1 minute read Monday, Oct. 15, 2018

The Royal Canadian Mint announced the issuing of a new two-dollar circulation coin commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Armistice.

 

The new two-dollar coin is stamped with it's special paint during the manufacturing process.The new two-dollar coin is stamped with it's special paint during the manufacturing process.

 

Monday, Oct. 15, 2018

The new two-dollar coin is stamped with it's special paint during the manufacturing process.

Manitoba kids learn to play the Blue Jays way

Jason Bell, photography by Mike Deal 6 minute read Preview

Manitoba kids learn to play the Blue Jays way

Jason Bell, photography by Mike Deal 6 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 11, 2018

ILE DES CHENES — The ball diamonds here are fields of dreams for kids like Marcus Burak this week as they learn the fundamentals of the game from a handful of former Toronto Blue Jays greats.

The nine-year-old Winnipegger, donning fancy shades and a spanking new Jays cap Wednesday morning, had stars in his eyes, running through pitching, hitting, fielding and base-running drills with some of the best to ever suit up in Toronto white and blue, such as Roberto Alomar and Lloyd (Shaker) Moseby.

He's one of more than 100 youngsters at the Jays' travelling Super Camp, a two-day minor baseball clinic for kids ages 9-16. It's the second time in three years the community 25 kilometres south of Winnipeg has hosted the camp.

Marcus, who plays out of Oxford Heights in Transcona, said it's awesome to receive some coaching from the ex-pros, even though they really are the idols of his father's generation.

Wednesday, Jul. 11, 2018

Former Blue Jays second baseman Homer Bush gives nine-year-old Marcus Burak pointers on batting.

Bear captured in Transcona

Mike Deal 0 minute read Preview

Bear captured in Transcona

Mike Deal 0 minute read Tuesday, Jun. 5, 2018

Tuesday, Jun. 5, 2018

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
Winnipeg Firefighters carry the bear in a tarp to the cage.