Niigaan Sinclair

Niigaan Sinclair

Columnist

Niigaan Sinclair has commented in and written for international and national print media and is on sabbatical from his job as an Associate Professor at the University of Manitoba.

He is Anishinaabe, born and grew up in Treaty One, and joined the Winnipeg Free Press as a columnist in 2018.

He is also a recovering high school teacher.

Recent articles of Niigaan Sinclair

Fomenting hate sets stage for heinous criminals’ devastating acts

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Preview

Fomenting hate sets stage for heinous criminals’ devastating acts

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Yesterday at 12:42 PM CST

When armed gunman Marc Lépine entered the École Polytechnique in Montreal on Dec. 6, 1989 and shot 28 people — killing 14 women — there was absolutely no denying that this heinous act was a hate crime.

In the suicide note he wrote before his rampage, Lépine said: “I have decided to send the feminists, who have always ruined my life, to their maker.”

A hate crime is when someone targets a person or set of people because of their membership in a social, religious, gendered, ethnic or racial group.

Lépine’s hatred of women didn’t happen overnight. He spent a lifetime fostering it through things he read, perceived and watched.

Yesterday at 12:42 PM CST

Family and friends of three murdered women gather at a vigil in Winnipeg, Thursday, December 1, 2022. It was announced that Jeremy Skibicki faces three more charges of first-degree murder. In addition to Rebecca Contois, who was identified earlier, Skibicki has been charged in the deaths of Morgan Beatrice Harris, Marcedes Myran, and an unidentified female. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

Say the names, remember them

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Say the names, remember them

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Friday, Dec. 2, 2022

For Anishinaabe people, funerals take four days.

During that time, it is said the spirit of the person who has died leaves their body to visit everyone they have ever cared for, watching to see how they are remembered.

On the fourth day, final instructions are given before the body is placed in the earth. The spirit is told, at that time, to travel to the west, where our ancestors live and where they will rest and be loved and cared for.

The spirit is also told not to worry about those they will leave behind.

Friday, Dec. 2, 2022

Family and friends of three murdered women gather at a vigil in Winnipeg, Thursday, December 1, 2022. It was announced that Jeremy Skibicki faces three more charges of first-degree murder. In addition to Rebecca Contois, who was identified earlier, Skibicki has been charged in the deaths of Morgan Beatrice Harris, Marcedes Myran, and an unidentified female. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

Indigenous youth awards spotlight on future

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Indigenous youth awards spotlight on future

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Friday, Nov. 25, 2022

After receiving the Manitoba Indigenous Youth Achievement Award for athletics, Russel Linklater had a message for everyone like him.

“When I was born, I was born a sick kid with heart problems,” Linklater said in his acceptance speech on Nov. 23 to nearly 300 people in attendance. “Then, both my parents, Delphine and Jonathan, passed and I ended up in Child and Family Services. I want to tell all CFS kids that, no matter what you do in the world, you can always do whatever you want.”

Linklater, from Garden Hill and Sandy Lake First Nations, has attained a black belt and a black stripe in taekwondo. He now takes care of his grandmother and his two sisters, ages 12 and 10.

He attends traditional ceremonies and plans on attending Red River College Polytechnic to study technical trades. He also dabbles in acting, appearing in a recurring role on the CTV Comedy Channel series Acting Good.

Friday, Nov. 25, 2022

Recipients of Manitoba Indigenous Youth Achievement Awards held at the Victoria Inn on Wednesday. (Tec Voc Photography)

Recognizing Indigenous names a small step

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Recognizing Indigenous names a small step

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Saturday, Nov. 19, 2022

I wrote a column in March about how the Manitoba Vital Statistics Act marginalizes Indigenous names and maintains the legacy of residential schools.

I pointed out that while the law allows for names that include European letters, accents, hyphens and apostrophes, for Indigenous languages that require other sounds, symbols and letters (called diacritics), identification is not accommodated.

At the time, I wrote about how the refusal to recognize Indigenous names has a long history of violence identified by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. There is even a specific call to action (No. 17) directing all governments in Canada to recognize Indigenous names.

I explained how Manitoba was falling behind other provinces and the federal government in this regard. In June 2021, Canadian officials announced all federal documents would be made to accommodate Indigenous writing systems. Alberta, Ontario and B.C. followed suit.

Saturday, Nov. 19, 2022

I wrote a column in March about how the Manitoba Vital Statistics Act marginalizes Indigenous names and maintains the legacy of residential schools.

I pointed out that while the law allows for names that include European letters, accents, hyphens and apostrophes, for Indigenous languages that require other sounds, symbols and letters (called diacritics), identification is not accommodated.

At the time, I wrote about how the refusal to recognize Indigenous names has a long history of violence identified by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. There is even a specific call to action (No. 17) directing all governments in Canada to recognize Indigenous names.

I explained how Manitoba was falling behind other provinces and the federal government in this regard. In June 2021, Canadian officials announced all federal documents would be made to accommodate Indigenous writing systems. Alberta, Ontario and B.C. followed suit.

U.S. court case would reverse rights of Indigenous kids

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U.S. court case would reverse rights of Indigenous kids

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Friday, Nov. 11, 2022

This week, while the eyes of the world have been on the United States mid-term elections, the U.S. Supreme Court has been hearing arguments in the remarkable Haaland v. Brackeen.

The case is fairly straightforward, led by a handful of non-Indigenous foster parents of Indigenous children (Brackeen) and the states of Texas, Louisiana and Indiana, who are asking the court to rule the Indian Child Welfare Act is unconstitutional because it is discriminatory.

The act, which became law in 1978, states if a child is removed from their parents and is “a member of an Indian tribe,” that child must be placed with a family member from that tribe, a family in their community or an Indigenous family.

The law makes sense, and has several thousand reports to back it up. Indigenous children who grow up knowing their culture, language, and nation are better off.

Friday, Nov. 11, 2022

The plaintiffs are arguing the law is discriminatory and violates the rights of non-Indigenous foster parents because it places them in “fourth-tier status.” (Mariam Zuhaib / The Associated Press files)

Ottawa hearings reveal harsh truths for Canada

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Ottawa hearings reveal harsh truths for Canada

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Friday, Nov. 4, 2022

If one thing is clear about what has been learned from the Public Order Emergency Commission investigating the so-called “freedom convoy,” it is the organizers didn’t care about anyone other than themselves and supporters.

When asked about concerns downtown Ottawa residents had about the round-the-clock truck horn-blowing, protest organizer Pat King testified: “We’ve been locked down for two years and people are complaining that they heard horns for 10 days. Do they remember what we went through? What’s a little bit of horns for 10 days?”

Charged with public mischief and other crimes, King and his fellow organizers spent their testimonies this week crying, complaining and playing the victim, saying they did nothing wrong by illegally occupying Canada’s fourth-largest city for three weeks.

When given the platform to freely share his opinions during national coverage of the hearings, King said: “I’ve had absolutely every right of a Canadian citizen stripped of me, my freedom of speech, my freedom of protest, my freedom of everything.”

Friday, Nov. 4, 2022

SEAN KILPATRICK / THE CANADIAN PRESS

Lich testified through tears Friday that her protest was never told to disperse.

New grand chief inherits organization in crisis

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New grand chief inherits organization in crisis

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022

If there’s one thing evident at the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, it’s that a grand overhaul is necessary.

Not change — an overhaul.

Electing the organization’s first female grand chief is a step in that direction.

On Wednesday, the majority of chiefs of Manitoba elected former Pimicikamak Cree Nation chief Cathy Merrick to lead Manitoba’s most powerful First Nations organization.

Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022

BRITTANY HOBSON / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

On Wednesday, former Pimicikamak Cree Nation chief Cathy Merrick was picked to lead Manitoba’s most powerful First Nations organization.

How has hoisting of Maple Leaf at rallies changed how we see symbol of tolerance and compassion?

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How has hoisting of Maple Leaf at rallies changed how we see symbol of tolerance and compassion?

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022

Last week, the Forks North Portage Partnership posted a call to hire a consultant to “gather input from Indigenous and non-Indigenous organizations, private and public partners of The Forks, and members of the public regarding Canada Day programming.”

For most Winnipeggers, Canada Day at The Forks is a day where tens of thousands come downtown to experience fireworks, music, dance and whole lot of nationalistic pride.

Featuring one of the largest gatherings this side of Ottawa, The Forks on July 1 is usually blanketed in flags, citizens singing bars of O Canada, and proud Canadians clad in red and white shirts, pants and face paint.

The Canada of 2022 isn’t quite the same as it once was.

Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022

Mike Sudoma / Winnipeg Free Press
A massive Canadian flag is seen flying from the back of a semi truck.

Indigenous policy platforms offer civic choice

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Indigenous policy platforms offer civic choice

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Friday, Oct. 21, 2022

Winnipeg’s mayoral hopefuls have been pitching platforms to Indigenous voters.

On Oct. 18, seven of the 11 candidates participated in a debate hosted by Treaty 1 chiefs. This weekend, a candidates’ debate will be hosted by the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs.

With the recent census data showing more than one-eighth of the capital city’s population is Indigenous (13 per cent), any Winnipeg mayoral candidate must have targeted initiatives and plans to engage work towards Indigenous inclusion and reconciliation.

Some candidates have made a lot of promises. Some have none at all. Others spend airtime spreading misinformed nonsense.

Friday, Oct. 21, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

Mayoral contender Scott Gillingham is promising to reinstate a joint RCMP-Winnipeg Police Service warrant task force, he says is critical to preventing crime in Winnipeg.

Turpel-Lafond in spotlight

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Turpel-Lafond in spotlight

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Monday, Oct. 17, 2022

There’s a saying on the Prairies that if you shake your family tree hard enough, an Indigenous ancestor is likely to fall out.

One family tree from this place has almost all of Canada talking about what constitutes Indigenous identity, nationhood, and sovereignty.

CBC published an extensive and thoroughly researched report on the genealogy of former judge and children’s rights advocate Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, who for decades has claimed she is Cree from northern Manitoba and a “treaty Indian.”

Reporter Geoff Leo uncovered that Turpel-Lafond’s “Cree ancestry, her treaty Indian status, the community where she grew up and her academic accomplishments are inconsistent with publicly available documents.”

Monday, Oct. 17, 2022

United in orange: making progress on the reconciliation path

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United in orange: making progress on the reconciliation path

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Thursday, Sep. 29, 2022

Drive by an elementary school playground this week if you still question the importance of the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation.

There, for all to see, are hundreds of kids from all races playing, arguing, and working together — united in orange.

Dressed by parents who want children to know that relationships with Indigenous peoples are important, these children are receiving some of the best and most inclusive and complete education in history.

Thanks to brave teachers, most Canadian children are learning about residential schools, treaties, and the complicated relationship shared by Canada and Indigenous peoples.

Thursday, Sep. 29, 2022

JOHN WOODS / CANADIAN PRESS FILES

Last year, 10,000 orange-clad citizens walked from The Forks to St. John’s Park for a powwow.

Census charts Indigenous, Canadian future

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Census charts Indigenous, Canadian future

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Monday, Sep. 26, 2022

Winnipeg and Manitoba are the centres of Canada’s Indigenous future — and the census proved it true again.

On Sept. 21, Statistics Canada released more data on the 2021 census, this time on Indigenous peoples. The data was unsurprising.

Indigenous communities continue to expand in Manitoba, particularly in Winnipeg. There are now 102,080 First Nations, Inuit and Métis people who call the capital city home, a 10 per cent rise from 92,800 in the 2016 census.

That means of 749,607 people in the city, nearly 14 per cent are Indigenous.

Monday, Sep. 26, 2022

Winnipeg and Manitoba are the centres of Canada’s Indigenous future — and the census proved it true again.

On Sept. 21, Statistics Canada released more data on the 2021 census, this time on Indigenous peoples. The data was unsurprising.

Indigenous communities continue to expand in Manitoba, particularly in Winnipeg. There are now 102,080 First Nations, Inuit and Métis people who call the capital city home, a 10 per cent rise from 92,800 in the 2016 census.

That means of 749,607 people in the city, nearly 14 per cent are Indigenous.

Reconciliation isn’t built in a day — but it would be a start

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Preview

Reconciliation isn’t built in a day — but it would be a start

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Friday, Sep. 16, 2022

The ambivalence is overwhelming.

In 2021, the federal government declared Sept. 30 as a national statutory holiday for Canadians to recognize the legacies of the residential school system.

This fulfilled call to action No. 80 of the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. Its goal: to “ensure that public commemoration of the history and legacy of residential schools remains a vital component of the reconciliation process.”

The National Day for Truth and Reconciliation coincides with Orange Shirt Day — an event created in 2013 to honour the experiences of residential school survivor Phyllis Jack Webstad.

Friday, Sep. 16, 2022

In 2021, the federal government declared Sept. 30 as a national statutory holiday for Canadians to recognize the legacies of the residential school system. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press files)

Lighting way to healing in wake of mass tragedy

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Lighting way to healing in wake of mass tragedy

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Friday, Sep. 9, 2022

While the eyes of the world turned from the tragedy in Saskatchewan to the death of the Queen, a remarkable spark was lit in the darkness.

At a news conference Thursday on James Smith Cree Nation — the place where two Cree men charged in a recent series of heinous crimes were raised — Darryl Burns (brother of homicide victim Gloria Burns) embraced the wife of Damien Sanderson.

“I have a young lady here, her husband is one of the accused,” Burns said, hugging the sobbing woman. “This woman shouldn’t have to bear that kind of guilt and shame and responsibility.”

Myles Sanderson, 32, and brother Damien Sanderson, 31, were charged with murder in a string of stabbing attacks that left 10 dead and 18 injured. Damien was found dead on the reserve east of Prince Albert; Myles died days later, shortly after being taken into police custody.

Friday, Sep. 9, 2022

HEYWOOD YU / THE CANADIAN PRESS

“Who are we as people?” Burns announced, holding the wife of Damien Sanderson in his arms. “We’re standing here talking about forgiveness.”

Reign marred by 70 years of inaction on Indigenous issues

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Reign marred by 70 years of inaction on Indigenous issues

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Thursday, Sep. 8, 2022

While growing up and visiting my relatives on-reserve, I was always struck by how a copy of Hello! magazine or a photo of Queen Elizabeth would sit prominently in the house.

I also remember as an eight-year old being carted around by family members during the Queen’s visit to Manitoba, in the hope of glimpsing her through the crowd.

I recall being an activist in the summer of 2010, when Queen visited Winnipeg, and working to ensure she was informed about the issues Indigenous people face in the city.

Indigenous peoples deeply care about the British Crown. It is the primary connective thread First Nations share with Canada.

Thursday, Sep. 8, 2022

Activists pulled down a statue of the Queen on the Manitoba legislature grounds on Canada Day 2021. (Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press files)

Many possible solutions but only one principle: caring

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Many possible solutions but only one principle: caring

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Tuesday, Sep. 6, 2022

I did some investigative research, and uncovered that of the 36 homicides reported by Winnipeg police in 2022 (as of Sept. 2), at least 23 involved an Indigenous victim.

I say “at least” because the history of such victims aren’t always easy to find.

If this pace continues, Winnipeg would experience 54 homicides, with about three dozen of those killed being Indigenous, by the end of the year.

That first number would match the annual record-high for homicides in the city, set in 2020. That year, 40 of the victims were Indigenous.

Tuesday, Sep. 6, 2022

I did some investigative research, and uncovered that of the 36 homicides reported by Winnipeg police in 2022 (as of Sept. 2), at least 23 involved an Indigenous victim.

I say “at least” because the history of such victims aren’t always easy to find.

If this pace continues, Winnipeg would experience 54 homicides, with about three dozen of those killed being Indigenous, by the end of the year.

That first number would match the annual record-high for homicides in the city, set in 2020. That year, 40 of the victims were Indigenous.

First for Supreme Court one step of many needed

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First for Supreme Court one step of many needed

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Monday, Aug. 29, 2022

Thursday will mark the first time this country will have an Indigenous person sitting on the most important legal bench in the land.

Michelle O’Bonsawin’s credentials are unquestionable. She speaks English and French, and some Abenaki — the first Supreme Court of Canada justice to do so.

O’Bonsawin’s career is full of “firsts” — most notably as the first Indigenous person to serve on the Ontario Superior Court of Justice.

Prior to that, she did legal work for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Canada Post and Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, specializing in mental health and the law.

Monday, Aug. 29, 2022

JUSTIN TANG / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILES

Michelle O’Bonsawin’s career is full of “firsts” — most notably as the first Indigenous person to serve on the Ontario Superior Court of Justice.

From optimism to disgust in the time it takes to remove a headdress

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From optimism to disgust in the time it takes to remove a headdress

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Monday, Aug. 22, 2022

It’s been exactly a month since Pope Francis visited Canada to apologize for the church’s role in residential schools.

There’s been much goodwill.

Good words. Big promises for changes by bishops and priests. The Pope even wore a headdress.

Some might even call it a moment of reconciliation between the Catholic Church and Indigenous peoples.

Monday, Aug. 22, 2022

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES

Former Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Lacrosse likely headed back to Olympics; some of world’s best players may not be

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Lacrosse likely headed back to Olympics; some of world’s best players may not be

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Monday, Aug. 15, 2022

Team Canada defeated Team Haudenosaunee 16-9 on Sunday in the final of the World Junior Lacrosse Championships, held all last week in Winnipeg.

It was a thrilling game between the tournament’s best and highest scoring teams. Team Haudenosaunee led all teams with an average 24 goals per game, including an impressive 14-12 victory over Team USA in the semifinals.

Still, after Team Haudenosaunee took the lead in the first quarter, Team Canada came back to win its fourth-straight gold medal.

The match was, in many ways, a future preview of what could be the 2028 Olympic final in Los Angeles, where lacrosse is expected to make it’s first appearance since 1948, when it was a demonstration sport at the London Games. It was an Olympic medal event twice, in 1904 and 1908.

Monday, Aug. 15, 2022

CLL | Darcy Finley

Team Canada defeated Team Haudenosaunee 16-9 on Sunday in the final of the World Junior Lacrosse Championships, held all last week in Winnipeg.

Inglorious end to Manitoba grand chief’s term

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Inglorious end to Manitoba grand chief’s term

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Monday, Aug. 8, 2022

In the end, it was fitting the reign of Arlen Dumas as grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs ended with the voices of Indigenous women.

For more than a decade, there has been talk of inappropriate behaviour surrounding the now-former spokesman for 62 First Nations in Manitoba.

It started with whispers, after Dumas became Chief of Mathias Colomb Cree Nation in 2008.

In May 2022, an Indigenous woman filed a complaint with Winnipeg police claiming Dumas sexually assaulted her in 2009. Dumas denied this.

Monday, Aug. 8, 2022

The Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs voted Friday to strip suspended grand chief Arlen Dumas of his title. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press files)

Indigenous peoples rise as 500 years of Catholic doctrine falls

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Indigenous peoples rise as 500 years of Catholic doctrine falls

Niigaan Sinclair 4 minute read Friday, Jul. 29, 2022

In 1550, at the height of Spanish attempts to colonize the Americas, a trial took place among Catholic Church leaders.

In what become known as the Valladolid debate (after the city it took place in) the question was: are Indigenous peoples human?

At the time, a crisis had emerged in the Catholic Church.

For decades, popes had issued decrees (often called the Doctrine of Discovery) declaring lands inhabited by non-Christians should be claimed by Christians and, in the case of the Americas, Indigenous peoples must be converted to Catholicism.

Friday, Jul. 29, 2022

Pope Francis presides over a Vespers service at the Cathedral-Basilica of Notre Dame de Quebec, Thursday, July 28, 2022, in Quebec City, Quebec. Pope Francis is on a “penitential” six-day visit to Canada to beg forgiveness from survivors of the country’s residential schools, where Catholic missionaries contributed to the “cultural genocide” of generations of Indigenous children by trying to stamp out their languages, cultures and traditions. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Papal visit puts reconciliation in global spotlight

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Preview

Papal visit puts reconciliation in global spotlight

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Friday, Jul. 22, 2022

On Sunday morning, in Edmonton, at around 11 a.m., a plane carrying Pope Francis will arrive, marking Canada’s fourth papal visit.

The following day, the Pope will travel to former Ermineskin residential school site to meet with residential school survivors. He will spend the remainder of the week in Quebec City and Iqaluit, meeting with Indigenous communities, church leaders and providing a few public addresses.

There will be some events designed to celebrate Catholicism — such as a huge mass at Edmonton’s Commonwealth Stadium — but this visit is mostly business.

Francis has described this trip as a “pilgrimage,” following up his apology in April to First Nations, Métis and Inuit representatives for the church’s role in residential schools.

Friday, Jul. 22, 2022

Pope Francis

No time to dance around barriers to inclusivity

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Preview

No time to dance around barriers to inclusivity

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Monday, Jul. 18, 2022

The Kamloopa Powwow held on Tk’emlúps te Secwe̓pemc territory is usually a big deal — maybe not so much this year.

Held in the middle of summer, the powwow near Kamloops B.C. is normally one of the best attended in the country with nearly $100,000 in prize money for dancers and drum groups.

Last Tuesday, the Kamloopa Powwow Society organizing committee announced its schedule and rules for dancers for the 41st annual competitive powwow.

Anyone competing must have at “least one-quarter Native blood” and “be in full regalia during competitions, grand entries, exhibitions/spot checks and to be of the correct gender for that category.”

Monday, Jul. 18, 2022

The Kamloopa Powwow held on Tk’emlúps te Secwe̓pemc territory is usually a big deal — maybe not so much this year.

Held in the middle of summer, the powwow near Kamloops B.C. is normally one of the best attended in the country with nearly $100,000 in prize money for dancers and drum groups.

Last Tuesday, the Kamloopa Powwow Society organizing committee announced its schedule and rules for dancers for the 41st annual competitive powwow.

Anyone competing must have at “least one-quarter Native blood” and “be in full regalia during competitions, grand entries, exhibitions/spot checks and to be of the correct gender for that category.”

Leadership row highlights AFN’s struggle for relevancy

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Leadership row highlights AFN’s struggle for relevancy

Niigaan Sinclair 5 minute read Monday, Jul. 11, 2022

On the second day of meetings at the annual general assembly of the Assembly of First Nations, AFN Youth Council co-chair Rosalie LaBillois was blunt, honest and condemning.

“Every time you decide to squabble amongst yourselves,” LaBillois told the chiefs, “you forget the children and young people that you once swore to protect.”

A “squabble” is the perfect descriptor for AFN meetings this past week, which were dominated by an attempted coup d’état by regional chiefs.

A month ago, after accusing National Chief RoseAnne Archibald of sharing confidential AFN information and opening an investigation into allegations of workplace harassment, the AFN “executive council” (made up mostly of leaders selected by provincial organizations called regional chiefs) suspended her.

Monday, Jul. 11, 2022

On the second day of meetings at the annual general assembly of the Assembly of First Nations, AFN Youth Council co-chair Rosalie LaBillois was blunt, honest and condemning.

“Every time you decide to squabble amongst yourselves,” LaBillois told the chiefs, “you forget the children and young people that you once swore to protect.”

A “squabble” is the perfect descriptor for AFN meetings this past week, which were dominated by an attempted coup d’état by regional chiefs.

A month ago, after accusing National Chief RoseAnne Archibald of sharing confidential AFN information and opening an investigation into allegations of workplace harassment, the AFN “executive council” (made up mostly of leaders selected by provincial organizations called regional chiefs) suspended her.