Drink & Dine

Food for Thought

Todd Lewys 4 minute read Friday, Oct. 14, 2022

When COVID-19 hit Winnipeg in March 2020, nearly everyone was taken by surprise.

Still, no one was overly concerned at the time. The assumption was that the coronavirus would wreak havoc for a month or two, and then gradually fade away. Business and life would eventually resume, and the pesky virus would become a distant memory.

How wrong we were. As it turned out, the virus hung around much longer than expected and proved to be much more infectious and deadly than first anticipated. Public health orders were imposed by the province to limit the spread of the virus, forcing people to stay home and businesses to close.

Among the businesses hit hardest by the closures were local restaurants, who depend on a steady stream of loyal customers to support their business.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Weather

This afternoon: Light snow -10°c Light snow This evening: Cloudy with clear breaks -11°c Cloudy with clear breaks

Winnipeg MB
-17°C, Ice crystals

Full Forecast

Summer fun for the whole family

By Trina Rehberg Boyko 6 minute read Preview

Summer fun for the whole family

By Trina Rehberg Boyko 6 minute read Thursday, Jul. 21, 2022

As the days get longer and the weather gets warmer, you might be craving some family time outside of your home. We’ve got the fix to help you and your family make the most of our short but spectacular summers.

Sweet treats

Dug and Betty’s Ice Creamery, 309 Des Meurons St.Dug & Betty’s namesakes are two basset hounds, so it’s no wonder this famed Winnipeg ice cream shop has something for everyone — right down to the pup cones it makes for its four-legged guests.

With a takeout window and picnic tables, you don’t have to worry about your kids spilling ice cream here. Its family-friendly atmosphere, along with its house-made hard ice cream, is what Dug & Betty’s is known for.

Read
Thursday, Jul. 21, 2022

Photo by Darcy Finley
Fern and Chris Kirouac display some of Dug and Betty's delicious delights!

Taking Joy in Cooking

Wendy King 4 minute read Preview

Taking Joy in Cooking

Wendy King 4 minute read Wednesday, Jul. 20, 2022

Growing a farmers’-market favourite into a semi-nationally distributed mustard brand is quite a leap. But Smak Dab founder Carly Minish-Wytinck’s success story isn’t about risky business moves. It’s about taking one sure-footed step at a time.

The Red Seal chef came up with the idea for Smak Dab one Christmas when she made mustard as gifts, and discovered she had a hit.

“Working in restaurants, I learned that mustard was incredibly versatile and valuable in the kitchen, so I played around with a recipe using beer and chipotle and gave it to my family — they loved it and that’s how it got going,” she says.

Minish-Wytinck grew up in a family of food lovers, and her “business why” is deeply rooted in bringing joy back to home cooking.

Read
Wednesday, Jul. 20, 2022

Runway Success

Sherry Kaniuga 3 minute read Preview

Runway Success

Sherry Kaniuga 3 minute read Monday, Jul. 18, 2022

What’s a pilot to do if they start to feel a bit peckish while flying the friendly skies of southern Manitoba?

Pilots of small aircraft know to look for a small, grassy landing strip at the northeast corner of Beausejour, where they can disembark just steps away from the Airliner Drive-In.

The popular destination embraces the airplane theme, with flight-related decor and menu items with names such as the Spitfire (a spicy burger), the Biplane (a Gimli pickerel burger) and the Avro Arrow (a sweet chili wrap with breaded pork).

Pilots taxi up to the restaurant almost daily — there might be 20 on a clear summer day, often swooping in to rendezvous with fellow flyers.

Read
Monday, Jul. 18, 2022

Delectable Desserts

Jennifer Mcfee 5 minute read Preview

Delectable Desserts

Jennifer Mcfee 5 minute read Friday, Jul. 15, 2022

A little indulgence has perhaps never seemed sweeter than during this tumultuous time.

For anyone looking to satisfy a sweet tooth, an impressive array of local businesses offer delectable desserts to savour.

At Decadence Chocolates, an artisan chocolate shop located at 70 Sherbrook St., owner Helen Staines specializes in creating small batches of treats.

“We have a very wide range of chocolate bars with about 26 different flavours. We have over 20 bonbons in our case, and we make our own caramels too,” she says.

Read
Friday, Jul. 15, 2022

Photo by Shel Zolkewich
Decadence Chocolates offers an assortment of holiday goodies.

Cheers to manitoba breweries

Jennifer McFee 5 minute read Preview

Cheers to manitoba breweries

Jennifer McFee 5 minute read Friday, Jul. 8, 2022

If you’re a true zythophile, or a beer-lover, you don’t have to search far to discover great local brews.

Brazen Hall Kitchen and Brewery flowed from the vision of president Kristján Kristjánsson, along with managing partner Kris Kopansky and head brewer Jeremy Wells.

In 2017, the bustling business launched on Pembina Highway at the former site of the iconic Round Table Restaurant, which Kristjánsson’s father Thrainn had opened and operated. Two years later, the brewery expanded and Brazen Brewing Co. was born. Assistant brewer Joshua Hodges joined the team in 2020.

With a focus on a small portfolio of core products, Brazen Hall strives to use high-quality local ingredients, including prairie hops and grains. They’ve added a canning line, and their products are now available in local restaurants, vendors and Liquor Marts.

Read
Friday, Jul. 8, 2022

Photos by Darcy Finley
This flight of TCB beers features Prickly Pear Sour, Horseshoe Hefeweizen, Altbier and Smoked Cherry Porter

No meat? No problem

Jim Timlick 4 minute read Preview

No meat? No problem

Jim Timlick 4 minute read Thursday, Jul. 7, 2022

The global pandemic has transformed the way we do most things and meal planning has been no exception.

Recent data from Google Trends showed a 113 per cent spike in plant-based and vegan-related food searches in Canada since 2016. In the past year alone, vegan food and diet searches in this country climbed by 25 per cent on the popular search engine.

That’s music to the ears of Candice Tonelete and Jessie Hodel, co-owners of Roughage Eatery, a popular Sherbrook Street all-vegan bistro.

“Yes, I’ve definitely seen that (trend) and agree with that. Our restaurant has been a lot busier,” says Tonelete, who opened the eatery two years ago with her spouse and business partner.

Read
Thursday, Jul. 7, 2022

Photos by Darcy Finley
Mac & Cheeze from Roughage Eatery

Artistic snacking

Jennifer McFee 5 minute read Preview

Artistic snacking

Jennifer McFee 5 minute read Wednesday, Sep. 15, 2021

Charcuterie boards are all the rage – and for good reason. They offer flexibility, quick prep times and the ability to add whatever ingredients you have on hand. You can simply start by artfully arranging an array of meats and cheeses, and then adding other finger foods such as fruits and nuts.These culinary creations can also be tailored to suit the tastes of different diners, with opportunities for gluten-free, pork-free, vegetarian, vegan or allergy-friendly spreads.“It is a great option because charcuterie boards are a definite crowd-pleaser. They can be something you make quickly. All you need is some tasty meat and cheese,” said Cassandra Carreiro, owner of a Winnipeg-based gourmet charcuterie catering and delivery company called Sharecuterie.“You can also have some fun and add your own personality in there by making it as esthetically pleasing as you would like – maybe with some meat or cheese roses – or by choosing unique flavours that appeal to you.”To prepare for surprise guests dropping by the cabin for an unexpected visit (dependent on pandemic restrictions, of course), it’s worth investing in a few key ingredients to create an easy-to-please snack platter. Must-have ingredientsFor adults, Carreiro suggests starting with cured meats such as salami and prosciutto. With cheese, you can be adventurous and try some unique options or stick with tried-and-true favourites like old cheddar, Brie or classic Bothwell flavours. She also recommends adding some pepper jelly, which elevates the overall board at an affordable price. Other mouth-watering additions include honey, pretzels, pickles, crackers, grapes and berries. For youngsters, Carreiro envisions a kids’ board with cheddar cheese, salami and crackers, as well as an assortment of fruit, veggies and dip. And without a doubt, an artful presentation is all part of the fun. “Everyone loves a nice-looking charcuterie board. It’s almost like creating an art piece,” she said. “You can play around with colours and textures, depending on your vibe, mood and theme of your get-together.”With a focus on supporting Manitoba businesses, Carreiro strives to buy local whenever she can – and she encourages others to do the same.“It’s just a bit fresher and you can taste the difference when it is made by a local or smaller business. However, when in a pinch, there are some good grocery store options as well,” she said. “You do not always have to break the bank to make a great board.”

The art of grazing is taking a bite out of meal preparation. 

Charcuterie boards are all the rage – and for good reason. They offer flexibility, quick prep times and the ability to add whatever ingredients you have on hand. 

You can simply start by artfully arranging an array of meats and cheeses, and then adding other finger foods such as fruits and nuts.

Read
Wednesday, Sep. 15, 2021

Charcuterie boards can be
tailored for the tastebuds
of adults and children.

Creative cottage cocktails

JENNIFER MCFEE 4 minute read Preview

Creative cottage cocktails

JENNIFER MCFEE 4 minute read Wednesday, Sep. 15, 2021

Cottage life is the good life – so why not kick up your feet, breathe in the fresh lake air and indulge in your favourite beverage of choice?For some, they might sip a glass of vino, cool down with a chilled brew or enjoy a non-alcoholic bevvie. Others might prefer mixing cottage cocktails to showcase their creativity and tempt their tastebuds.Acclaimed local mixologist Joel Carleton offers insights on must-have ingredients to create refreshing cabin cocktails.“All cocktails require balance between sweet and sour or bitter,” said Carleton, a national bar and spirits judge, as well as a gardening and foraging enthusiast. “Lemons or limes are necessary to be juiced.”Carleton suggests keeping white sugar on hand to make simple syrups, as well as maple syrup or honey for unique sweeteners.“Simple syrup is sugar and water mixed in equal parts,” Carleton said. “It lends neutral sweetness to drinks, which is required to provide structure to the cocktail.”To make a simple syrup, Carleton recommends adding equal quantities of sugar and water to a blender and mixing well.“If you don’t have a blender, heat the water and mix the two in a bowl. Do not heat them together in a pot,” he said. “Shelf life is three weeks in the fridge. Your first batch can be one cup water, one cup sugar and start from there. Refrain from making too much.”To take your simple syrup to the next level, try adding some herbs or a handful of berries to the blender. The herbs and berries can be local or leftovers to reduce waste.“Store the pulpy syrup in the fridge for one day to infuse, then strain for a berry syrup,” Carleton said.“You can also sub the water in the simple syrup recipe for juice or tea to create a flavoured or tea syrup – or throw herbs or tea leaves into simple syrup and let it sit in the fridge for a day or two. The flavours will infuse into the syrup.”No matter what cocktail you’re making, Carleton offers an easy formula for success: “Ice the glass fully, include an acidic component and only incorporate natural, fresh ingredients.”

Cottage life is the good life – so why not kick up your feet, breathe in the fresh lake air and indulge in your favourite beverage of choice?

For some, they might sip a glass of vino, cool down with a chilled brew or enjoy a non-alcoholic bevvie. Others might prefer mixing cottage cocktails to showcase their creativity and tempt their tastebuds.

Acclaimed local mixologist Joel Carleton offers insights on must-have ingredients to create refreshing cabin cocktails.

Read
Wednesday, Sep. 15, 2021

Bond Freyer
Foraged blueberries pop in this Crown Royal Cobbler.

A passion for grapes

Jim Timlick 4 minute read Preview

A passion for grapes

Jim Timlick 4 minute read Saturday, Jul. 17, 2021

Alex Allardyce felt more than a little overwhelmed when she was named Manitoba’s best sommelier in September.

Allardyce was crowned Manitoba’s top wine taster at the 2021 Best Sommelier of Manitoba Competition, held Sept. 7 and 8 in Winnipeg. The two-day event featured some of the province’s most esteemed wine experts competing head-to-head in a series of challenges including a written exam, blind tasting and mock wine and food pairing.

“I was incredibly nervous (going into it). I haven’t been in the industry that long. I’ve only been a working somm for two years now,” says Allardyce, who works at the Manitoba Club.

“It was incredibly surreal when I won. I felt like I was having an out-of-body experience. I saw the livestream later on. I was hugging the other competitors and I don’t even remember that happening. I was so shocked, but it was a great feeling.”

Read
Saturday, Jul. 17, 2021

Photos by Darcy Finley
Alex Allardyce humbled by best sommelier honour