September 25, 2018

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Mystery 'Garbage Hill' sign taken down nearly as quickly as it appeared

Los Angeles has its Hollywood sign in the hills above the city.

And, for a brief time, Winnipeg had one, too. Near the top of the city's highest hill -- at what is officially named Westview Park -- a big, bold sign in capital letters proudly proclaiming it "Garbage Hill."

"It's fabulous," Winnipeg painter, writer, curator and champion of public art Cliff Eyland said Monday morning.

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Los Angeles has its Hollywood sign in the hills above the city.

And, for a brief time, Winnipeg had one, too. Near the top of the city's highest hill — at what is officially named Westview Park — a big, bold sign in capital letters proudly proclaiming it "Garbage Hill."

The sign was removed by City of Winnipeg parks staff because it "was not installed with the city’s approval," a civic spokeswoman said. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

The sign was removed by City of Winnipeg parks staff because it "was not installed with the city’s approval," a civic spokeswoman said. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

"It's fabulous," Winnipeg painter, writer, curator and champion of public art Cliff Eyland said Monday morning.

"This seems perfect for Garbage Hill. Garbage Hill is important to people. It's a Winnipeg landmark."

However, by mid-afternoon Monday, as quickly as it had appeared, it was gone. Removed by City of Winnipeg parks staff because it "was not installed with the city’s approval," a civic spokeswoman said.

The sign was made out of wood with a Styrofoam core, and moored in post holes dug into the east-facing side of Westview Park above the roadway.  (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

The sign was made out of wood with a Styrofoam core, and moored in post holes dug into the east-facing side of Westview Park above the roadway. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

The sign wasn't nearly as big as the Hollywood sign, with its 13.4-metre-tall letters, but, for Winnipeg, it was pretty grand.

"I think it should be bigger," said Eyland, who is known for his paintings, drawings, and notes in an index card format. He first saw a photo of the Garbage Hill sign circulating on social media, but didn't know the identity of the artist who created it.

The sign was made out of wood with a Styrofoam core, and moored in post holes dug into the east-facing side of Westview Park above the roadway. The bright white sign against the dull green hill was visible from blocks away.

"I'm supportive of public art and it looks like someone really creative (made it)." -Coun. Scott Gillingham

"It's nice," said Rodante Garcia, who first noticed the sign Friday, during his daily hike up the hill in Winnipeg's West End.

It was a nice surprise, said the city councillor for the area.

"My initial reaction is: it's kind of fun," said Scott Gillingham, who represents St. James-Brooklands-Weston.

"I'm supportive of public art and it looks like someone really creative (made it). Someone's taken the Hollywood sign and gotten creative... I have referred to it as Westview Park, but I call it Garbage Hill, usually," he said. "That's what most residents call it."

"I'm glad to see the name glorified in it," said Brandi Martens, who walks by with her dog every day. "That's its true name." (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

"I'm glad to see the name glorified in it," said Brandi Martens, who walks by with her dog every day. "That's its true name." (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

However — foreshadowing the parks staff's quick response — Gillingham said he didn't know if the City of Winnipeg would be OK with it.

"I don't know if it's had any approval from the city," Gillingham said, adding he expected the appropriate civic department to take a look at it to make sure there aren't any safety concerns about the sign and its location.

By 3 p.m., the sign had been removed.

Hours earlier, Eyland said he hoped it would remain, as public art.

"I think it would be very sad. The idea has already been planted in people's heads," he said, comparing the Garbage Hill sign to the Hollywood sign. "It became iconic."

On Tuesday morning, Mayor Brian Bowman tweeted support for the sign.

 

 

An aerial view of the Hollywood sign atop Mount Lee in Griffith Park. (Wally Skalij/Los Angeles Times/TNS)

TRIBUNE MEDIA TNS

An aerial view of the Hollywood sign atop Mount Lee in Griffith Park. (Wally Skalij/Los Angeles Times/TNS)

The Hollywood sign (originally Hollywoodland) was built in 1923 to advertise real estate development.

The ad campaign ended but the sign stayed, having become an enduring symbol for Los Angeles and a tourist attraction. The Hollywood sign captured people's hearts and imaginations and the essence of a place.

Before becoming a city park, the area was operated as Westview Hill landfill from 1875 to 1948, and contained primarily ash and glass from the old garbage incinerator on Henry Avenue.

It was described in Guy Maddin's internationally acclaimed film My Winnipeg as the only piece of elevated land in the city — a former garbage dump covered in sod and converted to a park in 1960. The freezing and thawing, the mythical film said, sometimes heaved up jagged objects such as car fenders, posing a threat to toboganners.

"Winnipeg is a nightmare, but it's our nightmare," joked Eyland.

The park — bordered by Saskatchewan Avenue, Empress Street, Wellington Avenue and the railway lines along its eastern edge — is a year-round, multi-use area popular for tobogganing, cycling, running, walking and as an off-leash dog area.

"This seems perfect for Garbage Hill. Garbage Hill is important to people. It's a Winnipeg landmark," said Winnipeg artist Cliff Eyland. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

"This seems perfect for Garbage Hill. Garbage Hill is important to people. It's a Winnipeg landmark," said Winnipeg artist Cliff Eyland. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

"I'm glad to see the name glorified in it," said Brandi Martens, who walks by with her dog every day. "That's its true name."

A Hollywood-esque sign proclaiming its proper Westview Park name wouldn't work, artistically, said Eyland.

"You've got to do the vernacular thing. You've got to call it by what people call it," he said. "It's a lot of fun."

carol.sanders@freepress.mb.ca 

Carol Sanders

Carol Sanders
Reporter

Carol Sanders’ reporting on newcomers to Canada has made international headlines, earned national recognition but most importantly it’s shared the local stories of the growing diversity of people calling Manitoba home.

Read full biography

History

Updated on Monday, September 10, 2018 at 6:44 PM CDT: Updated

September 11, 2018 at 8:49 AM: Adds tweet from mayor

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