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Looking back: Manitoba Legislative Building construction

Winning design for the Legislative Building, 1912 (Archives of Manitoba)
Winning design for the Legislative Building, 1912 (Archives of Manitoba)
The blueprint for the area also included a Mall of Triumph, where a new, palatial city hall – designed but never built – was to be erected on what is now Memorial Boulevard. The city hall would have been a six storey, grey Kenora granite structure, based on the design of Buckingham Palace, at an estimated cost of $2.4 million (in 1913 dollars). (Archives of Manitoba)
The blueprint for the area also included a Mall of Triumph, where a new, palatial city hall – designed but never built – was to be erected on what is now Memorial Boulevard. The city hall would have been a six storey, grey Kenora granite structure, based on the design of Buckingham Palace, at an estimated cost of $2.4 million (in 1913 dollars). (Archives of Manitoba)
In 1913, Saskatchewan artist James Henderson drew up these City Beautiful-inspired plans for Winnipeg's legislature grounds, Broadway and what is now Memorial Boulevard.
In 1913, Saskatchewan artist James Henderson drew up these City Beautiful-inspired plans for Winnipeg's legislature grounds, Broadway and what is now Memorial Boulevard.
Excavation of Manitoba Legislative Building in 1913 (Archives of Manitoba).
Excavation of Manitoba Legislative Building in 1913 (Archives of Manitoba).
Legislature construction site in March 1915 (Archives of Manitoba).
Legislature construction site in March 1915 (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction in March 1915 (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction in March 1915 (Archives of Manitoba).
The construction crew in 1915 (Archives of Manitoba).
The construction crew in 1915 (Archives of Manitoba).
The construction site in June 1916 (Archives of Manitoba).
The construction site in June 1916 (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction in June 1916 (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction in June 1916 (Archives of Manitoba).
A view of the project from the south side in October 1915 (Archives of Manitoba).
A view of the project from the south side in October 1915 (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction in June 1916 (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction in June 1916 (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction in June 1916 (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction in June 1916 (Archives of Manitoba).
A view of the construction site from St. Stephens Church in May 1917. The city's second legislative building, which was demolished when the current one was completed, is in the foreground. (Archives of Manitoba).
A view of the construction site from St. Stephens Church in May 1917. The city's second legislative building, which was demolished when the current one was completed, is in the foreground. (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction of the legislature's interior in June 1917. (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction of the legislature's interior in June 1917. (Archives of Manitoba).
A large pile of Tyndall stone at the construction site in June 1917(Archives of Manitoba).
A large pile of Tyndall stone at the construction site in June 1917(Archives of Manitoba).
Interior construction in June 1917 (Archives of Manitoba).
Interior construction in June 1917 (Archives of Manitoba).
Interior construction in July 1917 (Archives of Manitoba).
Interior construction in July 1917 (Archives of Manitoba).
Interior construction in October 1917 (Archives of Manitoba).
Interior construction in October 1917 (Archives of Manitoba).
Workers construct the base of the dome in 1918 (Archives of Manitoba).
Workers construct the base of the dome in 1918 (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction of the dome in 1918 (Archives of Manitoba).
Construction of the dome in 1918 (Archives of Manitoba).
The Golden Boy is hoisted onto the dome in November 1919 (Archives of Manitoba).
The Golden Boy is hoisted onto the dome in November 1919 (Archives of Manitoba).
The legislature is completed in 1920 (Archives of Manitoba).
The legislature is completed in 1920 (Archives of Manitoba).

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