July 4, 2020

Winnipeg
17° C, Partly cloudy

Full Forecast

Winnipeg Free Press

ABOVE THE FOLD

Subscribe

Controversy? What controversy?: Liberals perform budget misdirection

Opinion

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 19/3/2019 (472 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Staring across the table at a bloodthirsty opposition and an increasingly skeptical electorate, Finance Minister Bill Morneau has decided to go all-in.

Morneau's fourth budget — and the last before a fall federal election — eschewed austerity and deficit control in favour of more than $20 billion in new program spending to create more affordable housing, extend more money for skills training, expand drug coverage, enhance high-speed internet, provide income boosts for seniors and improve living conditions for Indigenous peoples.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau delivers the federal budget in the House of Commons in Ottawa, Tuesday.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/SEAN KILPATRICK

Finance Minister Bill Morneau delivers the federal budget in the House of Commons in Ottawa, Tuesday.

Morneau had the option of holding the line on spending and using the more than $10 billion in unanticipated revenue the federal government expects to collect in this current fiscal year to report a dramatically lower deficit. Instead, all that revenue and more will be spent on programs that the Liberals believe will entice voters going into the election.

The master strategy is pretty obvious: Morneau and the Liberals are making a grand wager that largesse for core government services will not only create contrast with the federal Conservatives, their principal opponents, but also draw attention away from the still-smouldering SNC-Lavalin controversy.

From first light to late afternoon, budget day provided a very clear picture of both the dilemma facing the government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and the strategy it's employing — using the budget to leapfrog concern over political meddling in the criminal charges facing Quebec engineering firm SNC-Lavalin.

The House of Commons justice committee gathered Tuesday morning, hours before Morneau tabled his budget, and voted to cease its investigation into the SNC-Lavalin affair. The Liberal majority on the committee issued a terse statement indicating that "we have achieved our objectives with respect to these meetings."

The decision to stall further testimony on SNC-Lavalin — and concerns that the Prime Minister's Office and others tried to intimidate former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould into helping the engineering firm avoid criminal prosecution — set off angry threats from opposition MPs to use procedural tactics to delay introduction of the budget.

However, Morneau and the Liberals managed to pull a fast one on the opposition, introducing the budget earlier than anticipated to avoid stalling tactics. Morneau's speech was delayed by procedural motions, but the raw details of the budget itself were widely publicized by news organizations the moment he tabled the document.

The opposition did not go quietly. Even after Morneau finally rose to deliver his speech, Conservative and NDP MPs created a thunderous din by shouting and thumping their desks.

A protestor stands outside the Wellington building where the Justice committee was scheduled to meet in Ottawa, Tuesday.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/ADRIAN WYLD

A protestor stands outside the Wellington building where the Justice committee was scheduled to meet in Ottawa, Tuesday.

The Liberal tactic, in and of itself, was a bit of procedural brilliance. Rather than focusing solely on opposition protests and procedural motions, the official release of the budget papers meant journalists were busy pumping out stories on Morneau's spending plan. It didn't erase the SNC-Lavalin controversy from everyone's consciousness, but it certainly turned it into a faint, underlying soundtrack to the big numbers in the budget.

Voters can expect to see the Liberals use all of the majority-government tools at their disposal to continue pushing the controversy further from public view, while drawing more attention to the spending plan for the upcoming year. Embedded in all that strategic politics will be a simple message: do you want more government, or less?

The Liberals have been badly wounded by the SNC-Lavalin affair to date, and clearly the Trudeau government would clearly rather face condemnation for shutting down the justice committee than the damage that could come from a second round of testimony from Wilson-Raybould.

Jody Wilson-Raybould after speaking to the Justice committee about her involvement in the SNC-Lavalin affair in Ottawa in February. Wilson-Raybould has indicated an interest in remaining a candidate for the Liberal party in the Federal election this October.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/ADRIAN WYLD

Jody Wilson-Raybould after speaking to the Justice committee about her involvement in the SNC-Lavalin affair in Ottawa in February. Wilson-Raybould has indicated an interest in remaining a candidate for the Liberal party in the Federal election this October.

The Liberals certainly hope that their budget has enough in it to draw attention away from SNC-Lavalin.

Morneau delivered an array of programs for seniors including a pledge that those with lower incomes will be able to earn $15,000 (up from $3,000) before Ottawa begins to clawback the Guaranteed Income Supplement. Along with expanded drug coverage, the federal budget strikes a number of senior-friendly notes.

Younger Canadians, as well, had a lure dangled in their direction. Lower interest rates, and a longer interest-free period, on student loans along with other Millennial-friendly policies — a $5,000 subsidy for electric cars, larger withdrawals from RRSPs and a first-time homebuyer interest-free loan — certainly create talking points for younger demographics when it comes time to decide whether to vote, and for whom .

There are no huge-ticket items in the budget; just lots and lots of medium-sized goodies that hit on a wide array of key issues for the electorate. The big question now is, will this be enough to quash further interest in SNC-Lavalin?

The Trudeau government's decision to shut down further justice committee hearings suggests that Wilson-Raybould, the key figure in the controversy, may not want to say much more about what went on between her and Trudeau's senior staff. She has so far indicated an interest in remaining a candidate for the Liberal party in the October election; unless she abandons that plan, it is unlikely she will protest the cessation of committee hearings.

Conservative leader Andrew Scheer speaks to reporters with his caucus surrounding him after leaving Minister of Finance Bill Morneau's budget speech in protest to the handling of the SNC-Lavalin scandal, in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/JUSTIN TANG

Conservative leader Andrew Scheer speaks to reporters with his caucus surrounding him after leaving Minister of Finance Bill Morneau's budget speech in protest to the handling of the SNC-Lavalin scandal, in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday.

Without Wilson-Raybould, the opposition will find itself in a real predicament. Tory Leader Andrew Scheer's increasingly shrill allegations of a coverup and calls for a judicial inquiry will eventually wear thin without additional new information on the controversy. Particularly in the wake of a pre-election budget that has enough in it to drive news coverage for weeks to come.

For now, SNC-Lavalin continues to burn brightly on the federal political stage. However, with the introduction of Morneau's budget, the Liberals are very close to starving this controversy of the oxygen needed to keep the fire going.

dan.lett@freepress.mb.ca

Dan Lett

Dan Lett
Columnist

Born and raised in and around Toronto, Dan Lett came to Winnipeg in 1986, less than a year out of journalism school with a lifelong dream to be a newspaper reporter.

Read full biography

Your support has enabled us to provide free access to stories about COVID-19 because we believe everyone deserves trusted and critical information during the pandemic.

Our readership has contributed additional funding to give Free Press online subscriptions to those that can’t afford one in these extraordinary times — giving new readers the opportunity to see beyond the headlines and connect with other stories about their community.

To those who have made donations, thank you.

To those able to give and share our journalism with others, please Pay it Forward.

The Free Press has shared COVID-19 stories free of charge because we believe everyone deserves access to trusted and critical information during the pandemic.

While we stand by this decision, it has undoubtedly affected our bottom line.

After nearly 150 years of reporting on our city, we don’t want to stop any time soon. With your support, we’ll be able to forge ahead with our journalistic mission.

If you believe in an independent, transparent, and democratic press, please consider subscribing today.

We understand that some readers cannot afford a subscription during these difficult times and invite them to apply for a free digital subscription through our Pay it Forward program.

History

Updated on Tuesday, March 19, 2019 at 7:19 PM CDT: Updates headline

The Free Press will close this commenting platform at noon on July 14.

We want to thank those who have shared their views over the years as part of this reader engagement initiative.

In the coming weeks, the Free Press will announce new opportunities for readers to share their thoughts and to engage with our staff and each other.

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.