WAG opens exhibit of works by Labrador Inuit

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The Winnipeg Art Gallery unveiled a new exhibition of Inuit art Friday, the same day construction began on a new Inuit Art Centre to house the world's largest collection of art from the North.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 25/05/2018 (1651 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

The Winnipeg Art Gallery unveiled a new exhibition of Inuit art Friday, the same day construction began on a new Inuit Art Centre to house the world’s largest collection of art from the North.

Titled SakKijâjuk: Art and Craft from Nunatsiavut, the exhbition is the first major exhibition of works from Labrador Inuit artists, the gallery says.

On hand at the groundbreaking ceremony were artists whose works are part of the show, including textile artist Chantelle Andersen, seamstress Peggy Andersen, photographer Michelle Baikie, sculptor and printmaker Gilbert Hay and filmmaker and seamstress Inez Shiwak. The Labrador Inuit are known for their stone, wood and bone carving and sealskin clothing, but the exhibition also reveals contemporary art using video, photography, printmaking and ceramics employed by the artists.

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS SakKijâjuk, a new exhibit of art done by Inuit in Labrador, will be open until the fall.

SakKijâjuk (pronounced sak-eye-ook) means “to be visible” in the Labrador dialect of Inuktitut, and for Inuit artists from Labrador, their works and their stories have been nearly invisible for centuries due to their remote location. Works by 47 artists spanning four generations make up the exhibition, which will be on display until Oct. 14.

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