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Flavours of Folklorama

Videos and recipes bring the tastes of city's multicultural festival into your home

What draws people back to Folklorama year after year? The opportunity to try food from around the globe is a big part of the multicultural event's appeal. This year, the Free Press is highlighting a handful of easy-to-make recipes from the two-week festival, which got its start in 1970 (Week 1 runs Aug. 6-12; Week 2 runs Aug. 13-19).

The United Kingdom Pavilion represents four countries and Hilary Fergusson says each one is represented with its own culinary speciality. Among the offerings are fish and chips (England), pasties (Wales), shortbread (Scotland) and Guinness stew (Northern Ireland).

With popular dishes such as bangers and mash and cottage pie on the menu, Fergusson says the pavilion will go through more than 200 kilograms of mashed potatoes, as well as about 350 kg of chips during the opening week of the festival.

"We also have a traditional English Tea for Two, which includes sandwiches (cucumber and cress; Marmite, cheese and onion; tuna and sweet corn; egg salad), scones plus a sampling of sweets (shortbread, imperial cookies, date squares, tarts and chocolate cake)," Fergusson says. "It includes a pot of one of four U.K. teas."

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What draws people back to Folklorama year after year? The opportunity to try food from around the globe is a big part of the multicultural event's appeal. This year, the Free Press is highlighting a handful of easy-to-make recipes from the two-week festival, which got its start in 1970 (Week 1 runs Aug. 6-12; Week 2 runs Aug. 13-19).

John Raoux /  The Associated Press files</p><p>Butterbeer, the fictional beverage enjoyed by wizards in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series.</p></p>

John Raoux / The Associated Press files

Butterbeer, the fictional beverage enjoyed by wizards in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series.

The United Kingdom Pavilion represents four countries and Hilary Fergusson says each one is represented with its own culinary speciality. Among the offerings are fish and chips (England), pasties (Wales), shortbread (Scotland) and Guinness stew (Northern Ireland).

With popular dishes such as bangers and mash and cottage pie on the menu, Fergusson says the pavilion will go through more than 200 kilograms of mashed potatoes, as well as about 350 kg of chips during the opening week of the festival.

"We also have a traditional English Tea for Two, which includes sandwiches (cucumber and cress; Marmite, cheese and onion; tuna and sweet corn; egg salad), scones plus a sampling of sweets (shortbread, imperial cookies, date squares, tarts and chocolate cake)," Fergusson says. "It includes a pot of one of four U.K. teas."

The pavilion provided the Free Press with a recipe for Butterbeer, the fictional beverage enjoyed by wizards in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series — not exactly a standard menu item. 

"We do mix traditional fare with items from pop culture, such as our 007 Martini Bar, which features the Casino Royale, Skyfall and Vesper martinis," explains Fergusson. 

The Chile Lindo Pavilion's recipe is for Pebre, a traditional Chilean salsa. Spokesperson Jairo Alfaro-Juarez says Chilean cuisine is very diverse because of the country's long coastline.

"What sets it apart from other South American food is the strong European influence, mixed with Mapuche (the native people of the Andes region), as well as Chile's trend toward more modern dishes and gastronomy," Alfaro-Juarez says.

Other delicacies available at the pavilion include empanadas, pastel de choclo (corn pie), borgona (red wine with strawberries) and torta mil hojas (thousand-layer cake).

Head to winnipegfreepress.com to see the Flavours of Folklorama videos demonstrating how to make Butterbeer and Pebre.

 

United Kingdom Pavilion:  Butterbeer Drink

Punjab Cultural Centre, 1770 King Edward St. 

 

 

4 cans cream soda (clear, not coloured)
60 ml (1/4 cup) butterscotch syrup, divided
250 ml (1 cup) heavy cream
30 ml (2 tbsp) sugar
10 ml (2 tsp) pure vanilla extract
60 ml (1/4 cup) melted butter

 

In a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, beat cream until stiff peaks form. Fold in sugar and vanilla extract, then melted butter until completely combined.

Mix 15 ml (1 tbsp) butterscotch syrup and with one cream soda in beer stein or tall glass; repeat with three other glasses. Serve with a dollop of whipped cream on top. Makes 4.

 

Chile Lindo Pavilion: Pebre (Chilean chili salsa)

Notre Dame Recreational Centre, 271 Avenue de la Cathedrale 

 

 

250 ml (1 cup) onion, white or yellow
2 large red tomatoes
30 ml (2 tbsp) diced banana pepper
30 ml (2 tbsp) cilantro leaves, finely chopped
30 ml (2 tbsp) olive oil
8 ml (1/2; tbsp) salt
Juice of one 1 lemon or lime
2 cloves of garlic

 

To mellow onions, season diced onion with 8-15 ml (1/2-1 tbsp) of salt. Let rest for 5-10 minutes, then rinse well.

To easily peel tomatoes, slit a quarter way down in quarters, boil for 30 to 60 seconds. When the peel starts to separate, put tomatoes into a bowl of ice water. Remove stem, quarter, seed and dice tomatoes.

Mix rinsed diced onion, tomatoes, diced banana pepper and finely chopped cilantro in a large bowl. Add olive oil, lime juice and salt to taste; grate in 2 cloves of garlic and thoroughly mix. Let pebre rest 5 minutes. This is the traditional "chunky" version; if you want smooth pebre, use a blender to create a smooth sauce.

To store, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate, lasts about 5 days. Optional: If you want more of a kick, add Sriracha sauce to preferred spiciness.

Serves about 6.

Tester's note: We were unable to find banana peppers; we substituted a jalapeno with good results.

 

Pearl of the Orient Philippine Pavilion: Leche Flan (caramel custard)

Flan is a testament to how fabulous flavors emerge from the right combination of simple ingredients.</p></p>

Flan is a testament to how fabulous flavors emerge from the right combination of simple ingredients.

R.B. Russell High School, 364 Dufferin Ave.

8 egg yolks 
1 can evaporated milk
1 can condensed milk
5 ml (1 tsp) vanilla extract
Zest from one lime
60 ml (1/4; cup) simple syrup

Add egg yolks, evaporated milk, condensed milk, vanilla extract and lime zest in a bowl and mix well. Strain mixture using cheese cloth.

Using a llanera (traditional flan mould) or individual round pan, pour in simple syrup and spread evenly. Then add the strained mixture. Cover the mould with aluminum foil and steam for 45 minutes.

After steaming, let it cool down and set. Flip the mould, placing the leche flan onto a plate, and serve.

Note: The traditional method is to use a stovetop steamer, such as a bamboo rice steamer. If you don't have a steamer, it's also possible to set the llanera in a larger shallow pan filled with 2.5 cm/1 inch of hot water and steam the flan in a 350 F oven for about 50 minutes.

jill.wilson@freepress.mb.ca

Twitter: @dedaumier 

Read more by Jill Wilson.

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History

Updated on Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at 8:30 AM CDT: Photos added.

8:39 AM: Formatted.

11:42 AM: Adds video, corrects photo placement.

August 10, 2017 at 11:03 AM: Fixes fractions

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