Canada and U.S. to invest heavily in ‘climate-smart’ agriculture

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Canada backed a controversial initiative aimed at boosting countries' support for high-tech farming methods designed to reduce emissions and mitigate the impacts of climate change on farms and food on Tuesday.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 04/11/2021 (456 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Canada backed a controversial initiative aimed at boosting countries’ support for high-tech farming methods designed to reduce emissions and mitigate the impacts of climate change on farms and food on Tuesday.

The Agriculture Innovation Mission for Climate (AIM4C) initiative developed by the United States and the United Arab Emirates encourages participating countries and businesses to invest heavily in “climate-smart” agriculture within the next five years. The $4-billion program will foster new scientific breakthroughs through support for public and private agricultural research centres and help farmers access them.

“As stewards of the land, farmers are on the front lines of climate change,” said U.S. President Joe Biden, speaking at a closed plenary session at the ongoing COP26 meeting in Glasgow as he formally launched the program. According to its website, the new initiative will work with a “wide range of participants” — including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — to boost high-tech farming worldwide.

A controversial new initiative officially launched Tuesday by U.S. President Joe Biden aims to pump about $4 billion into new high-tech farming practices globally. (Photo by AIM4C)

To read more of this story first reported by Canada’s National Observer, click here.

This content is made available to Free Press readers as part of an agreement with Canada’s National Observer that sees our two news brands collaborate to better cover environmental issues.

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